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Dealing with job interviews

Anon63456

New Member
In the past I have had a large number of job interviews (haven't kept count but probably somewhere between 60 and 100) and failed all but one. I have had plenty of different jobs over the years but almost always got them by passing some test or being referred to by someone.

One way I have tried to get round the interview issue is building up a large amount of academic qualifications to try to outdo the competition that way. With my studies ending I am applying for jobs again.

All the usual interview technique stuff I'm generally aware of - prepare answers to anticipated questions before hand, try make eye contact, try build rapport with interviewer, be presentable etc.

Knowing that and putting it into practice are two different matters though. If I can say something wrong in an interview, I almost certainly will - by accident. I struggle to come across as presentable and I tend to have a blank look on my face, look distant or unenthusiastic about the job/interview (I'm not unenthusiastic, I just dont show it well, I'm definitely not a good actor). I've had plenty of feedback about this before.

This stuff I'm all aware of and try to do what I can to deal with it, but after so many failed interviews I just accept my brain is never going to handle this situation as well as others, as much as I try.

A question I have is how to try get this point across to interviewers beforehand without it making the whole process awkward before it even starts?

I don't want to sound rude or arrogant to the interviewer, but how much eye contact I make, how well ironed my shirt is or the tone of my voice sounding blunt and plain has little to do with my ability to do technical work I'm applying for (which is much better reflected by qualifications I have). Unfortunately the social stuff/personal presentation in interviews has a huge bearing on getting the job, even if it has little impact on your ability to do the work well (depending on the job you're applying for obviously).
 
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RotanotNino

Active Member
Yeah job interviews just flat out suck. When I had to do them I took an approach like yours that involved being prepared to discuss certain principles and industry standard practices without veering off course. Even though I never did excel at job interviews I did learn to brush aside questions designed to elicit butt kissing responses like Why do you want to work for OUR company? with a combination of I need a job/I can do this job and I'm not a salesman. That attitude of letting them know that you are not a salesman is common among the tradesmen and engineers I worked around, though it likely did cost me here and there. I have no idea if it will work in your field. I hope you develop a workable strategy.
 

Primrose

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I had lots of failed interviews too. Last time I went for one I decided I had absolutely nothing to lose, I dropped all thoughts about previous failures and went in to the interview as cheerful and positive as possible and did my best to speak confidently and calmly. Somehow, I got the job!

So all I can suggest is learn what you can from previous interviews and then let go . You know you are well qualified and experienced so be confident and positive!
 

Thinx

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Really they should know that in your industry. It's frustrating if they don't. I think it applies in a lot more areas too, but there is this idea that everyone has to be chatty and smiley. Which actually doesn't always help get the work done, even in communication related work. I'm often poor at interviews, and rely on my CV and experience until they get to know me. All I can say is, have plenty examples that you know what they need done and how to do it. That's always persuasive.
 

Darkkin

Lioness of Spoons
V.I.P Member
My current job, I asked for an application and got an interview that day. I didn't have time for doubt to even be a thing...I'm still there.
 

kingscross

New Member
I'm terrible with interviews also. I haven't been able to get a single job in my field since graduation or even leave the town I went to college in. Ho hum.
 

Ronald Zeeman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I Applied For job's Where my skill level would be hard to find qualified candidates and easy to check references. Very good at Resumes and application letters. let my track record show through. Not scared to blow own horn. Know my stuff do not need to exaggerate, can be checked with sales reps suppliers.
I'm terrible with interviews also. I haven't been able to get a single job in my field since graduation or even leave the town I went to college in. Ho hum.
I'm terrible with interviews also. I haven't been able to get a single job in my field since graduation or even leave the town I went to college in. Ho hum.
First job is the hardest, then you build on it. MY first job and last were almost identical.
Started as a lab tech on a coil coating line retired as a lab tech on a coil coating line. In the intervening years became top expert.
 

Ronald Zeeman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
In the past I have had a large number of job interviews (haven't kept count but probably somewhere between 60 and 100) and failed all but one. I have had plenty of different jobs over the years but almost always got them by passing some test or being referred to by someone.

One way I have tried to get round the interview issue is building up a large amount of academic qualifications to try to outdo the competition that way. With my studies ending I am applying for jobs again.

All the usual interview technique stuff I'm generally aware of - prepare answers to anticipated questions before hand, try make eye contact, try build rapport with interviewer, be presentable etc.

Knowing that and putting it into practice are two different matters though. If I can say something wrong in an interview, I almost certainly will - by accident. I struggle to come across as presentable and I tend to have a blank look on my face, look distant or unenthusiastic about the job/interview (I'm not unenthusiastic, I just dont show it well, I'm definitely not a good actor). I've had plenty of feedback about this before.

This stuff I'm all aware of and try to do what I can to deal with it, but after so many failed interviews I just accept my brain is never going to handle this situation as well as others, as much as I try.

A question I have is how to try get this point across to interviewers beforehand without it making the whole process awkward before it even starts?

I don't want to sound rude or arrogant to the interviewer, but how much eye contact I make, how well ironed my shirt is or the tone of my voice sounding blunt and plain has little to do with my ability to do technical work I'm applying for (which is much better reflected by qualifications I have). Unfortunately the social stuff/personal presentation in interviews has a huge bearing on getting the job, even if it has little impact on your ability to do the work well (depending on the job you're applying for obviously).
Some employers are starting to realize that us Aspies make exceptional employees. if you get one they can single handed change your company. That is how I approached one interview, see me in a year. Your process will be the best in the industry. Got the position as a service rep on in a automotive assembly plant. True to my word and to thier shock Did what I said I would. 16 plants mine had the best control, even beating the japanese, plants they supplied. Saw ad in trade magazine the industry wanted to try reverse onus on one of there processes. Wrote letter to supplier I wanted to be the point person for this experiment. There current employees, could vouch for me. I was Hired did what I said I would. changed the industry.
 
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Ronald Zeeman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I've had 100's of job intereviews, over the years the more experience I got the easier it got to get the position.
 

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