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A better autism test

MTA-P

Member
I am trying a self-diagnosis on for size, to see if it fits. It was an odd fit at first, not quite right, but I think I am wearing it in. The more I look into it through the lens of believing I am on the spectrum, the more it feels right. However It never would've felt right if I'd just read these descriptions on these tests. Even the tests reccomended by these forums have their problems.

I'll try to avoid specifics, or else we could be here all day, but my experiences don't match what's on these tests, or in the descriptions of austism that you find in medical resources. An example would be that we're described as not understanding social cues; I understand social cues, I understand what they mean, I just don't know what to do with them. The tests and descriptions imply a level of obliviousness, where I am painfully aware of all this stuff.

Of course, speaking to other people with lived experiences of autism would be a much better way of understanding autism, and therefore understanding if I relate to it.

So, the question is: what question would you put on an autism quiz? What is an autism trait that's often misunderstood, or badly described, that might help undiagnosed people relate to autism?
 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
A question that was asked during my diagnostic examination was "How do you cope with US spelling?".

It relates to the way we can be a bit pedantic about things being different to what we were taught. I also can't stand movies where I have already read the books.
 

Duncan74

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
A question that was asked during my diagnostic examination was "How do you cope with US spelling?".
Same way when someone criticises my pronunciation. I very politely that the language name is "English" and therefore whilst noting their inventiveness, my passport demonstrates why I am going to win this argument if they go that way.

Normally I'm saying this with a smile. Occasionally that smile is sincere.
 

Duncan74

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
So, the question is: what question would you put on an autism quiz? What is an autism trait that's often misunderstood, or badly described, that might help undiagnosed people relate to autism?
I'll say I'm different, self-diagnosed, but everyone of the tests has me very comfortably in the aspie camp.

Now I also struggle with many of the questions on the test, in terms of how they directly apply to me. But then I also recognise I'm not a psychiatrist, psychologist or expert in autism, these tests have been assessed and shown to be repeatable and produce a statistically significant correlation between those clinically assessed to have autism and the test showing they fit in the Autisism category, and vice versa (non autistics shown by test to not indicate autism).

So I just go with it and put my faith in the process, as opposed to overthinking the specific questions.
 

MTA-P

Member
A question that was asked during my diagnostic examination was "How do you cope with US spelling?".

It relates to the way we can be a bit pedantic about things being different to what we were taught. I also can't stand movies where I have already read the books.
Interesting... How do you cope with American spelling?

I'm pedantic about it too. But I always put that down to being a little neurotic. Like, American spelling is meant to be simpler, they wanted to simplify the language. So I can imagine that someone being careless could slip into American spelling without consciously meaning to. And I don't want to be thought of as being careless. I also wouldn't want to be thought of as the sort of person who's so careless as to mix American and English spellings, that's my neurosis.

So I think that illustrates my issue with how autism is described. Autistic people like order, and rules, but the way those traits are described implies that we like order and rules for their own sake - we always follow rules, because rules are rules, even if those rules are arbitrary. We can't use American spelling, because American spelling is wrong. Everything must be in order, because our order is right.

I think that's kinda how autism is portrayed in the media too.

So yeah, that would be an example of an autistic trait that I may relate to, but which I would totally miss, depending on how it's described.
 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
Interesting... How do you cope with American spelling?
It really grates on my nerves, it frustrates me. It's not just the spelling but also wrong conjugation of verbs.

Pet hates: "he shined a torch" and "cleaved in two".

And as Duncan74 mentioned, some pronunciations bother me too. One that drives me mental is the word awry. I grew up with this word in common use, it rhymes with gory, dory and Tory.
 

Duncan74

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Advise used when it should be Advice. "I gave the client some advise." I swear that is used wrongly 99% of time here.

Albeit noting that this is picking on a very small part of the OP - sorry about that.
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member
Sorry, World. We are a strange bunch, still young in the world.

PS Football
1674349547317.jpeg

??????
 

MTA-P

Member
Same way when someone criticises my pronunciation. I very politely that the language name is "English" and therefore whilst noting their inventiveness, my passport demonstrates why I am going to win this argument if they go that way.

Normally I'm saying this with a smile. Occasionally that smile is sincere.
This attitude is a little triggering to me. I take it you're English, as in from the U.K., so you'd actually have some authority that some of the people I have dealt with. I am in New Zealand, where we typically, historically follow U.K. English, but we're far enough from England that we don't have that authority. The older generation tends to pick whatever pronunciation or spelling they like, and proclaim that it's proper queen's English, and that anything else is wrong. Down here, just because someone speaks U.K. English, doesn't mean they know the correct way of pronouncing or spelling words.

My mother still doesn't believe that they say "day-ta" in England, and she yells about it, because she's completely round the bend. Watching Star Trek: TNG was an ordeal.

Real talk though: why are people criticising your pronunciation? I am not saying it's the wild west, and we can just spell and pronounce things however we want, but these things are correct or incorrect depending on culture. American pronunciation and spelling are correct in America. So while no one should be picking fights with you over your pronunciation, having an English passport doesn't make you universally correct.
 
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Lysholm

Well-Known Member
Are you Autistic? Y/N

That was easy. You're welcome.

Bwahaha!

Seriously though, I'd ask this:

You are in a social setting and you embarrass yourself. Do you: A) get defensive and point out everyone else's flaws to distract from your own behavior? or B) Existentially fold in on yourself and feel ashamed of this moment for the rest of your life?

A = 90% likelihood NT

B = 90% likelihood ND
 

Duncan74

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
This attitude is a little triggering to me. I take it you're English, as in from the U.K., so you'd actually have some authority that some of the people I have dealt with. I am in New Zealand, where we typically, historically follow U.K. English, but we're far enough from England that we don't have that authority. The older generation tends to pick whatever pronunciation or spelling they like, and proclaim that it's proper queen's English, and that anything else is wrong. Down here, just because someone speaks U.K. English, doesn't mean they know the correct way of pronouncing or spelling words.

My mother still doesn't believe that they say "day-ta" in England, and she yells about it, because she's completely round the bend.

Real talk though: why are people criticising your pronunciation? I am not saying it's the wild west, and we can just spell and pronounce things however we want, but these things are correct or incorrect depending on culture. American pronunciation and spelling are correct in America. So while no one should be picking fights with you over your pronunciation, having an English passport doesn't make you universally correct.
;-) Born UK, now living in NZ for last 12 years. In full fairness then I claim English to be my second language, with Yorkshire my native tongue. And yes I now have swapped my dar-tah for day-ta, my root-a for my row-ta and my chips for my chups. Just don't go after my iggs.

As you say there's a lot of culture on language, and it does evolve.
 

Duncan74

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Sorry, World. We are a strange bunch, still young in the world.

PS Football
View attachment 94936
??????
Thing on end of legs = foot. Thing on end of arms you catch and throw with = hand.

Ergo
1674349547317-jpeg.94936
= handball.

And don't get me started on geography and world series.....

(Edit to explicitly state the above said with tongue firmly in cheek, joking and in a very friendly way, just being silly on a Sunday PM).
 
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Stuttermabolur

A psychologist said so
V.I.P Member
I am trying a self-diagnosis on for size, to see if it fits. It was an odd fit at first, not quite right, but I think I am wearing it in. The more I look into it through the lens of believing I am on the spectrum, the more it feels right. However It never would've felt right if I'd just read these descriptions on these tests. Even the tests reccomended by these forums have their problems.

I'll try to avoid specifics, or else we could be here all day, but my experiences don't match what's on these tests, or in the descriptions of austism that you find in medical resources. An example would be that we're described as not understanding social cues; I understand social cues, I understand what they mean, I just don't know what to do with them. The tests and descriptions imply a level of obliviousness, where I am painfully aware of all this stuff.

Of course, speaking to other people with lived experiences of autism would be a much better way of understanding autism, and therefore understanding if I relate to it.

So, the question is: what question would you put on an autism quiz? What is an autism trait that's often misunderstood, or badly described, that might help undiagnosed people relate to autism?

I completely agree with you on those tests. I would also add, that I think we ourselves are often not the best judges of our abilities. When I took my first test with my then-partner a few years ago, I kept wanting to put my social skills as average, while she was quite adamant they were actually terrible and I look very strange to most people. I just don't realize how offputting I am in person. I also want to be very sure if I'm saying I exhibit some "symptom", and tend to say no if it's borderline as I don't want to give people (or tests no-one but me will see) the wrong idea. Another problem I have with many of the tests is that they have a sliding scale of answers, where you can be "somewhat sure" or "very sure". I never know what criteria to use when answering and since I tend to have dull emotions I check the more subdued box.

I'm also very much a "technically correct" type of person, instead of looking at the intention behind the questions. One question I remember from RAADS-R went something like "do you like dinner conversations?" My thinking went something like "well, I like conversations, and especially listening to other and having something to do while I eat, so sure". However, on thinking about it later, I much prefer speaking with people without having my mouth full most of the time and tend to be very silent when eating since I'm focusing on the food, and have even have people comment on it. So yes, technically I like dinner conversations since I like eating and talking (which is why I responded yes), but I still much prefer it if they are separate activities which is probably what they actually wanted to know.

I tend to be in the borderline range of the results, but I really think it's because of how the quizzes are constructed. I always feel very unsure about whether my answers are the correct ones and if I am understanding the questions correctly, and think it would really help having a professional to discuss each question with before answering. It would be even better if they could have a conversation with me and then fill the questionnaire in themselves based on our discussion.

One of my problems with the tests (and one you identified) is how they don't make the distinction between intuitively and logically understanding something. There's a lot of stuff I understand and don't really have a problem with now, but it's because I've deliberately trained myself to think differently, and perhaps came to an understanding from a different route from most of the population. However, most quizzes ask "do you understand x" rather than "are you frustrated/annoyed/bemused by x" which describes my thinking much better.

I see a lot of anecdotes which are weirdly common among autists, and is ultimately what I relate to the most. Some of them might be "do you tend to walk quickly?", "do you feel as if a pane of glass is between you and the rest of the people in a group discussion?", "do you put a lot of effort into preventing misunderstandings?" or "do you tend to befriend outsiders, the opposite gender or people in a different age range than yourself?". Those anecdotes (including the one @Outdated came up with just now, which I strongly relate to) are actually what really made me accept being autistic. I also discovered that most of my friends (in isolation, they don't know each other) also suspect they are autistic and harbor even stronger traits than I do. I had been drawn to autists without even trying to because it was so much easier to communicate with them.

So... I guess you can add "Do you make a long-winded explanation with several examples to respond to a simple question?" to your list of questions. In fact, I think having written answers rather than multiple choice would show much more clearly who is autistic.
 
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MTA-P

Member
It really grates on my nerves, it frustrates me. It's not just the spelling but also wrong conjugation of verbs.

Pet hates: "he shined a torch" and "cleaved in two".

And as Duncan74 mentioned, some pronunciations bother me too. One that drives me mental is the word awry. I grew up with this word in common use, it rhymes with gory, dory and Tory.
Can you say why those things bother you? Like I say, they always imply that there is no reason, we just don't like deviation from what we expect. Bad punctuation mildly annoys me, and I guess that's just because it's wrong.

Then again, people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones. I've always had the attitude that I have no place getting worked up about grammar, if my grammar isn't perfect. I had no idea "cleaved in two" was wrong.
 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
we just don't like deviation from what we expect.
That's pretty much it, deviation from what I see as normal. I communicate and sometimes work with people from all over the world and I'm used to many different types of irks and quirks. I don't belittle others for their different usage of language but internally it does annoy me.
 

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