• Welcome to Autism Forums, a friendly forum to discuss Aspergers Syndrome, Autism, High Functioning Autism and related conditions.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Private Member only forums for more serious discussions that you may wish to not have guests or search engines access to.
    • Your very own blog. Write about anything you like on your own individual blog.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon! Please also check us out @ https://www.twitter.com/aspiescentral

does aspie depression progress over time?

alien girl

Well-Known Member
i get depressed very easily and sometimes for no reason. i think this is the result of asperger.
i know mania depression gets faster and more sever over time. i also heard mania depression and asperger correlate a bit.
does aspie depression get wrose over the years? i hope not...
i was depressed ever since i was seven or five, dont remember exactly. especially i got depressed seing the sun about to set, and walking in the street in the evening. that's when my anxiety kicked up, too. especially if the street was crowded and loud.
many aspie suffer from general anxiety, and i heard anxiety and depression are related, too.
i was really depressed as a teenager, age sixteen. it lasted maybe two years, and then got milder and milder. for many years now, it's real mild. i've never had a mania pharse. it's just aspie depression.
 

King_Oni

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I think... just like any people who get depressed, key is to keep busy doing things you like to do and keep in the safe zone and out of depression.

Sure, you might end up in a slight depression and all, but at least try to keep yourself happy doing things you like, and not doing things people expect you to do. The trick though might be to find a balance there.
 

Tramb

Well-Known Member
I think that get depressed is not useless, i don't say that everybody have to be d?pressive, just that's somthing useful.

I don't really understand all the Positive d?sint?gration th?ory, but i feel it true: be active of what we are.

"does aspie depression get wrose over the years?"
(i don't have AS official diagnosis) on my side it was worse when i was younger (i have 36), for speak true i've done a suicide attempt at 20... and today my life is quiet: i live in countryside, have a wife , 2 childrens and few very good friend (only my job is a realy big problem)
i'm still be easely frustrated or closed, but i accept that.
 

FishyEnthusiest

Well-Known Member
I have found that I don't really get manic, but I have "episodes" of depression, sometimes for no reason. I am either down or level, I never have any manic type behavior and I am never hyper.

I have been on medications for 10 years (I am 29) but I have been depressed for as long as I can remember. Medication helps even me out and I don't have as many episodes but they still happen. Although it doesn't help that I forget my meds every once inawhile.
 

2wheels4ever

Well-Known Member
I'll get more situational manicky if I am just killing it with my interests or I'm in the early stages of a brick-and-mortar relationship; I'm an infatuation junkie and can act like I've been up for 3 days on meth. But lately with no new activity I start to notice a depression curveball in the middle of something positive
 

Bay

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Speaking as someone who has been treated for depression since being in my 20s, it does get easier over the years. I don't think that I have depression much at all anymore. I will say that it was worst in my 20s but got gradually better every year after that.
 

alien girl

Well-Known Member
I have found that I don't really get manic, but I have "episodes" of depression, sometimes for no reason. I am either down or level, I never have any manic type behavior and I am never hyper.

I have been on medications for 10 years (I am 29) but I have been depressed for as long as I can remember. Medication helps even me out and I don't have as many episodes but they still happen. Although it doesn't help that I forget my meds every once inawhile.

i love "this awkward silence has been brought to you by asperger syndrome." i think it's hilarious. hope you feel better.
 

arthurfakaya

Well-Known Member
I get depressed very easily and sometimes for no reason. I think this is the result of asperger... Does aspie depression get worse over the years?

I believe depression and anxiety are a natural response to the difficulties Aspies have experiencing life. Therefore the severity and duration of the depression or anxiety will be determined by how well we function in our daily lives. Aspergers causes me more anxiety than depression, but you might experience more depression than anxiety. I think depression and anxiety are close cousins and can be equally debilitating to deal with on a daily basis. Neither should be ignored. In my humble opinion the better we learn to cope with Aspergers through the strategies we adopt, the less likely we will be to suffer depression and anxiety. So, we mustn't simply surrender ourselves to the debilitation that Aspergers can cause. We need to be proactive. Medication can help us cope by altering brain chemistry, but I don't think it should be seen as a permanent solution.:D
 

NeverEnder

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I have been in treatment for Depression for 12-years.

It comes and goes. But, for me, it never goes completely.

In the last 2-years I have been in a prolonged Depression; Only recently (With an increased dosage of medication) have I been "coming out" of it, somewhat.

I feeling better on some levels, not as depressed as before. But my anxiety continues along with the Asperger symptoms.
 

HelloDizzy

Bed-Cookie
V.I.P Member
Mine has never fully left. It gets worse and better, depending on what is going on. It isn't a chemical depression for me.
 

Bay

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
If it got better before it is likely to get better again. I have had to tell myself in the past to just hold on until the worst passes. It always does eventually.
 

arthurfakaya

Well-Known Member
If it got better before it is likely to get better again. I have had to tell myself in the past to just hold on until the worst passes. It always does eventually.

Yes, we need to bear in mind that mood disorders like depression fluctuate and cycle - there is no such thing as a constant psychological state. It can be difficult to tolerate but sure as spring follows autumn you'll get there. You just might have to pass through winter first.
 

Gomendosi

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Is it still depression if that is the default setting for the individual?

I never knew I was depressed, I thought everyone dealt with stuff as I did, I have never actively sought to determine the level of my depression or define its full scope within my conscious mind but I am now starting to believe that it is my natural state as other people have spotted it straight away, I was most surprised when my doctor asked me if I would like to go on medication for my depression.

Lately I have achieved a few things that should have me on top of the world (Ma), but regardless of how I look at it; the situation has gone from bad to worse whereas any sane person would be elated, as is my assumption at least.

Recently I have been in a state where everything is unknowable, and I have become obsessed with some things that NEVER bothered me before. Like death!
 
Last edited:

King_Oni

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Is it still depression if that is the default setting for the individual?

This... I don't feel I'm depressed nor pessimistic, but I'm not overly optimistic either. It's a bit like that quote "A pessimist is a well-informed optimist" which I feel applies to me.

I constantly look for pros and cons for whatever it is I'm doing. I don't see everything as utterly ******. Some things do have more cons, and that's where they turn more ******... but to my information, that's rational thinking, that's nowhere of an emotional involvement whatsoever.

My therapist didn't think I was depressed in a clinical sense, but rather that with the way I perceive things, they might go sour. And she didn't feel that giving me meds to alter my perception was the key. Besides, I wouldn't want that either. I don't want to end up in a overly optimistic guy who think everything is fun and games no matter how bad it is. And that's kinda what I could expect from meds. Meds work for people who have a deficient going on in their brain... having a realistic world view in general is a rational view (surely, people might disagree here), which can get you depressed, but that's still not a deficient as such.

If... if... someone experiences nothing but a lot of crap in his life, should you medicate that person to cope with all ****** things and just go "oh... it's ******, but I like it"... I believe a few centuries ago they invented a term for that... masochism.
 

Bay

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
There is a name for chronic, low level depression, dysthymia. I have been diagnosed as having it, but I don't really believe that I do. I just have a desire to retreat.
 

arthurfakaya

Well-Known Member
I don't feel I'm depressed nor pessimistic, but I'm not overly optimistic either...I constantly look for pros and cons for whatever it is I'm doing. I don't see everything as utterly ******. Some things do have more cons, and that's where they turn more ******... but to my information, that's rational thinking

I agree. If we can rationally analyse the pros and cons of a situation, we can achieve a realistic perception of the world. Being a realist avoids becoming overly pessimistic or optimistic about things. I think it's when we have an unrealistic outlook that we're more likely to become depressed or manic or to suffer neuroses and psychoses. Even when life is genuinely ******, a person can examine their situation realistically and see that it's only a temporary condition. I think being realistic can sometimes be better advice than "snap out of it", or "look on the bright side", or "here have some anti-depressants". Personally, I found it more helpful to deal with what was making me depressed than to have my mind altered by anti-depressants, but everyone is different.
 

total-recoil

Well-Known Member
It sometimes helps to try and find out what is making you depressed. In my case I know it tends to be caused by any perception of rejection, not feeling you can fit in and so on. I also think a huge factor for me is the type of society we live in. I don't really get major depression that often but when I do it's horrendous.
I do know that the right type of exercise can have a massive impact. Cardiovascular exercise releases dopamine into the brain. It's a pain killer that acts as an upper.
 

New Threads

Top Bottom