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Featured Being inflexible

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by Ihaveaspergers, Nov 6, 2020.

  1. onlything

    onlything Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    You have a point. Frankly, I know little about teaching instruments myself. I teach languages to kids that long before coming to me learn to hate the subject, not to hobbyists and potential musicians.

    Although, in my experience, many things need to be learnt simply through repetition. This is how I learnt guitar and drawing. What else can you do but repeat and try to do it better each time? I can't really imagine a different way of learning these things but through regular exercises of similar pieces. But then, maybe that's exactly what you speak of when you mention autism. A very specific way of doing things.

    Never heard of a different one. What other ways are there? What else could be done?
     
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  2. Ihaveaspergers

    Ihaveaspergers Active Member

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    I agree with that!
    Most people tell me that if I find something difficult I need to do more repetition instead of trying to understand what is difficult. This is the issue. Sure we must repeat something but we sometimes need something more as well.
    There is no "aspie way of learning" other than most aspies need to focus more on the fundamentals and how different skills relate to eachother.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2020
  3. onlything

    onlything Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Ah, relations between different skills in different fields. I always had problems with that which was why it is difficult for me to create a project based on multiple fields, such as mathematics, physics and biology. It's overwhelming. It's challenging. That's why I like it which probably sounds illogical.

    But yes, I always had to take more time than others to understand simple things, the fundamentals and how they related to each other. As a student I could for example solve complicated exercises in one unit, but found it especially challenging to use the same methods in a different unit while connecting it with something else. My brain would just label a skill as useable in that specific set of instances and later I would have trouble understanding that it can be used outside of it as well. It wasn't as obvious to me as it was to others. I had to be taught that things can relate to each other and are very rarely lonely islands they seem to be due to the way they are taught at school.