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Aeolienne

Well-Known Member
(Not written by me)

Autism to ADHD: thinking differently about recruitment
Despite having much to offer, neurodiverse people can struggle to land a job. Some firms are now looking at new ways to tap into their talents

By Georgina Fuller
Mon 3 Feb 2020

The term “diversity and inclusion” has become ubiquitous in the corporate world yet neurodiverse people – those with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyspraxia or dyslexia – are often overlooked.

One in seven people are "neurodivergent", according to ACAS. Despite this, a recent study by the CIPD found that seven in 10 businesses ignored their own neurodiversity policy.

Neurodiverse people can, however, often bring a dazzling array of skills and an alternative perspective to the workplace.

Those with ADHD, for example, could have the ability to “hyper focus” and excel when working to tight deadlines. People with autistic spectrum disorder may have the ability to concentrate for long periods of time and be supremely reliable. And those with dyslexia might have strong verbal skills.

Some employers have realised that standard recruitment methods, such as panel interviews, might not work as well for neurodiverse people: Ernst and Young, BT and Siemens all have programmes for neurodivergent employees.

Consumer goods giant P&G has recently launched an apprenticeship programme in conjunction with the National Autistic Society (NAS) for its innovation sector.

Emma O’Leary, who oversees the programme, says: “To attract different thinkers, your approach needs to be different. The traditional method of verbal-based interviews is very limiting if social communication is a challenge.”

While the programme focuses on those with autism, P&G encourages anyone with a neurodivergent condition to apply.

“So far, between the UK and Boston, P&G have had more than 50 people attend the assessment day, and 11 employees progressing on to internships,” O’Leary says.

Liz Johnson, co-founder of The Ability People, a disability inclusion consultancy, says there are a number of measures employers can take to make apprenticeship schemes more accessible. “They include: training interviewers to allow neurodiverse candidates to perform at their best; eliminating jargon in job descriptions; explicitly stating you welcome neurodiverse candidates; and completing desk assessments for new joiners, so they don’t experience sensory overload.”

Having a more neurodiverse workforce can help employers reflect the different needs and outlooks of their customers, Johnson adds. “The extra insight they gain will help them adapt their products so they best serve the needs of their whole customer base.”

Emma Kearns, head of Enterprise and Employment at the NAS points out that only 16% of autistic people are currently estimated to be in full-time employment. “Most autistic people are desperate to find a job that reflects their talents but the recruitment process, with unpredictable questions, is often a huge barrier.”

Ultimately, says Johnson, employers need to realise that failing to recruit and include neurodiverse people can mean missing out on new ways of thinking and untapped talent. “And in the incredibly competitive world of business this isn’t something any company can afford to miss out on.”

Source: Guardian
 
Nice sentiment but having worked for a wide diversity of compaines I can tell you that the number one trait employers want weither they know it or not is the ability to get along with other people.
tech ability, problem solving, being the smartest most knowledable person in the room all fall 2nd or 3rd to it.
Sorry for sounding so negative but I think a lot of people have weird ideas that becuase they have xyz they are entitled to special accomodation but that only stretches so far. e.g. physical limitations such as wheelchair users.
 
(Not written by me)

Autism to ADHD: thinking differently about recruitment
Despite having much to offer, neurodiverse people can struggle to land a job. Some firms are now looking at new ways to tap into their talents

By Georgina Fuller
Mon 3 Feb 2020

The term “diversity and inclusion” has become ubiquitous in the corporate world yet neurodiverse people – those with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyspraxia or dyslexia – are often overlooked.

One in seven people are "neurodivergent", according to ACAS. Despite this, a recent study by the CIPD found that seven in 10 businesses ignored their own neurodiversity policy.

Neurodiverse people can, however, often bring a dazzling array of skills and an alternative perspective to the workplace.

Those with ADHD, for example, could have the ability to “hyper focus” and excel when working to tight deadlines. People with autistic spectrum disorder may have the ability to concentrate for long periods of time and be supremely reliable. And those with dyslexia might have strong verbal skills.

Some employers have realised that standard recruitment methods, such as panel interviews, might not work as well for neurodiverse people: Ernst and Young, BT and Siemens all have programmes for neurodivergent employees.

Consumer goods giant P&G has recently launched an apprenticeship programme in conjunction with the National Autistic Society (NAS) for its innovation sector.

Emma O’Leary, who oversees the programme, says: “To attract different thinkers, your approach needs to be different. The traditional method of verbal-based interviews is very limiting if social communication is a challenge.”

While the programme focuses on those with autism, P&G encourages anyone with a neurodivergent condition to apply.

“So far, between the UK and Boston, P&G have had more than 50 people attend the assessment day, and 11 employees progressing on to internships,” O’Leary says.

Liz Johnson, co-founder of The Ability People, a disability inclusion consultancy, says there are a number of measures employers can take to make apprenticeship schemes more accessible. “They include: training interviewers to allow neurodiverse candidates to perform at their best; eliminating jargon in job descriptions; explicitly stating you welcome neurodiverse candidates; and completing desk assessments for Pnew joiners, so they don’t experience sensory overload.”

Having a more neurodiverse workforce can help employers reflect the different needs and outlooks of their customers, Johnson adds. “The extra insight they gain will help them adapt their products so they best serve the needs of their whole customer base.”

Emma Kearns, head of Enterprise and Employment at the NAS points out that only 16% of autistic people are currently estimated to be in full-time employment. “Most autistic people are desperate to find a job that reflects their talents but the recruitment process, with unpredictable questions, is often a huge barrier.”

Ultimately, says Johnson, employers need to realise that failing to recruit and include neurodiverse people can mean missing out on new ways of thinking and untapped talent. “And in the incredibly competitive world of business this isn’t something any company can afford to miss out on.”

Source: Guardian
Pie in the sky.
 
Yeah. You have to be carefully optimistic about such articles. In this instance, this particular article lacks one key element in Proctor & Gamble's equation. That they aren't simply looking for autistic employees, but rather autistic employees with "STEM" talents. Proven expertise in science, technology, engineering and math.

Here's a domestic (US) article that is a bit more specific in this regard:

https://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2019/10/15/p-g-boosts-hiring-of-people-with-autism.html
 
Although ASD is not recognized under the Americans with Disabilities act, at least an article like this raises awareness (consciousness raising, we called it back on the day), so its a positive thing. We need to have a presence in the media. One day i believe it will be illegal to discriminate against the neurodiverse. Not today, but its coming.
 
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