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What I learned about motorcycles

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Pats, Jun 17, 2019.

  1. Pats

    Pats Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I think motorcycles always represented freedom and travel to me and I loved them. In high school I told my parents that all I wanted for graduation was a motorcycle and I was going to do like "Then Came Bronson" and just ride from town to town doing odd jobs for money for food and gas. Didn't happen, but that was my dream - I just wanted to go and feel the wind in my face. I rode on back of bikes every opportunity I had - mostly dirt bikes. When I was 50 I finally learned to ride one myself on a dirt bike and had a blast on that thing - wiped out a few times, but loved it. I moved up to a street bike, but by this time with my neck issues causing all the numbness in my hands and arms it was hard to control the gas, clutch and brake with my hands. I rode some - preferred riding alone, but had to keep it short because the numbness. And I did quickly learn that spiders can be a danger when one is swinging on it's web in front of your face shield.

    But I learned that you don't want to take bike trips with a narcissist. When we first got married I talked my husband into getting a bike with side compartments and we would drive to Montana on it instead of driving his van. I learned a lot from that - when people would ask me how I was able to do it I gave the same answer. You don't have a choice - when your 1000 miles from home and that's your only means of transportation, you have no choice but to climb back on that thing and go. I learned it takes longer to get anywhere because you have to make more frequent stops - not just for gas, but also for your back and bottom's sake. :) And I learned that you don't take a long trip on a newly purchased used bike. Driving through Chicago - the bumpiest interstate in the country probably - one of the luggage compartments just detached and popped up, which I somehow managed to catch it in the air so we didn't lose it. That happened twice, actually, as we drove through Chicago and my husband finally tied it down so it wouldn't keep popping off.

    Driving through South Dakota was interesting. Ever drive through SD? It's windy. I think we rode through the entire state leaning one way then the other due to the wind. And then it started raining. We had rain gear, but it still felt wet - and cold - even though when we stopped it'd be hot. There's not a lot of motels and places to stop through South Dakota either. I remember sitting on back of the bike, cold and wet, singing 'Sunshine on my shoulders'.

    But what I learned most was that riding on the back you have not control whatsoever. That was our honeymoon and that's when I started seeing a bit of control going on. He always stopped to rest at a spot that there would be absolutely nothing for me to do and he'd lay in the grass and take a nap. He couldn't stop at a little diner or western shop with stuff I could go inside and browse. And he'd find motels that were not close to any shops and stuff so I couldn't go shop or anything while he watched golf on tv in the room. He did get a room once (oh - I always had to pay for the room) at the edge of town once and I walked a little over a mile to get some pictures developed). And one of the things I most looked forward to was spending time in Apgar Village inside Glacier Park. That's where I planned to pick up something for each of my kids and mom and grandkids and have shipped. We were there 5 minutes and he says he has a headache and we have to go. Ugh!!!!! As soon as we got to a motel away from any shopping, though, he was fine and went golfing. Did not go over well with me - I knew that might be the last time I ever got to Apgar Village to find all kinds of neat moose stuff and maybe picnic overlooking Lake McDonald and the rugged mountain peaks sitting on the other side of the lake. Well, that did it - from that point on when he would motion that his shoulders needed rubbed while driving down the road I refused to acknowledge it.

    So we used to ride on weekends and would end up sitting hours in a rocking chair outside a bike shop while he and other bikers shared stories and I hated it. So he would ask if I wanted to go and I would ask if that's what he had planned to do and he would say no, we'll ride over the mountain - which I did enjoy. So I would go and we'd stop at the bike shop and he'd end up spending too much time there that we didn't get to go riding across the mountain. I stopped going.

    He took away my love for motorcycles, and now instead of seeing them as freedom, I see them as a trap.

    No purpose to this - just sharing a story. :)
     
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  2. Tom

    Tom Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Its too bad you couldn't have been the one driving the bike with him in the sidecar. Then once you got it up to top speed, detach it.
    ;)
     
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  3. Mia

    Mia Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Think I liked motorcycles when I was younger, liked the speed and the excitement of being on one, when you think you'll live forever. Once at the age of fourteen, I was meeting up with a girlfriend after school. I was in a town I didn't know well, and had to find a pay phone to call her so she could tell me where to meet her on a certain street. I didn't have change, so I walked into what seemed to be a local cafe in the bottom of a small hotel.

    It was the local chapter and clubhouse of a motorcycle gang. I stood there looking at all these guys sitting at tables who were staring at me. An older guy said, "Who sent us a present?" And everyone began to laugh.

    Another guy got up quickly, walked over and grabbed me by the arm and pulled me out of there. "What are you doing here?" 'Trying to get change for the phone.' "Not here you won't." "I work for your Dad at the shop and he wouldn't like it if you were here." I went out with this guy from my hometown, later, until my Father found out. He along with a few others, didn't make it past the age of twenty five. They called them 'donneurs' or organ donors in the area I lived in. It may have had more to do with their gang activity which I was completely clueless about, than the fact that they all drove motorcycles.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2019
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  4. BraidedPony

    BraidedPony Just Enjoying Survival V.I.P Member

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    Pats, that was an excellent example of how they take the joy out of everything. Yup.
    Sorry you had one.
     
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  5. Pats

    Pats Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Ikes!!
     
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  6. Nitro

    Nitro Admin/Immoral Turpitude Staff Member Admin V.I.P Member

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    70657__13776.1344028605.jpg
     
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  7. Bolletje

    Bolletje Potato chip wizard V.I.P Member

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  8. Nitro

    Nitro Admin/Immoral Turpitude Staff Member Admin V.I.P Member

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    laughs....I'll bet he doesn't see one :p
     
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  9. Kyou Nukui

    Kyou Nukui music is amazing

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    I feel like this thread is more about narcs than motorcycles and I was tricked into reading it. :(
     
  10. Pats

    Pats Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Sorry - I guess I should have titled it what I learned about motorcycles from a narcissist. :) But they really can be more of a trap from the perspective of the passenger.
     
  11. oregano

    oregano really wants a solar panel and a AGM battery

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    In the hippie era of the 60s motorcycles to many represented the counterculture, sticking it to "the man". Listen to the song Born To Be Wild, which sexualizes (subtly) riding a motorcycle. And then there's the iconic hippie movie Easy Rider, which is all about motorcycles. In Easy Rider, a group of hippies rides aimlessly through the countryside on motorcycles while pontificating about freedom from "the marketplace". In the end they're murdered by a group of bigoted rednecks who deep down hate the "true freedom" represented by the motorcycle riding hippies.

    Today the motorcycle is the center of a whole subculture, with its own sub-subcultures, such as criminal mafias like the Mongols and the Vagos (Hells Angels have largely disappeared), and Christian bikers who "ride for Jesus" and go to special churches that are specifically meant for bikers, and many more. A sociological exploration of American motorcycle culture would make quite a fascinating book. The worship of the motorcycle is unique to the US, AFAIK. I think it's part of a deeper cultural worship of the rootlessness inherent in a country that until the end of the 19th century was always expanding into unknown lands and a people who often lived far from "civilization" and thus had to rely on themselves.
     
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  12. Pats

    Pats Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Yes, I lived during the hippie era and loved being in West Yellowstone surrounded by choppers and long haired 'hippies'. :) Possibly all that was part of the freedom they made me feel. I have a good friend who's an old hell's angel who never really talked about it, but would always tell me to let him know if I ever need anything. (It's okay, I'm fine). And my brother was part of a Christian biker group but went from there to a horse-riding Christian group (both in Az). I'm not in contact with him. I remember telling him years ago that, because so many lawyers and doctors and upper class people started riding in groups that Barbie would come up with a Harley Barbie. He argued there was no way, but within a year there was a Harley Barbie. lol

    But I don't understand one thing about riding in groups. They ride out west and instead of going to scenic places they ride from Harley shop to Harley shop. What the heck??? If I'm out west on a Harley I'm going to ride for the view, not for the bike shops.

    Interesting that other countries don't do the bike thing like here.
     
  13. clg114

    clg114 Still crazy, after all these years. Staff Member V.I.P Member

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    Most of my motorcycle experience was with dirt bikes and racing. Mia mentioned calling motorcycle riding gang members "organ donors". That is what racers (who wear all the safety equipment they can) call street riders who ride without a helmet. Moto-cross riders know that they will crash many times. It is just part of racing.
     
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  14. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Well....hang in there. ;)

     
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  15. Pats

    Pats Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    that's kind of funny - organ donors. I thought the meaning with Mia's comment meant they were donators of other people's organs.
     
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  16. Pats

    Pats Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I even married a Michael Parks - but not the right one. LOL
     
  17. Nitro

    Nitro Admin/Immoral Turpitude Staff Member Admin V.I.P Member

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    When in doubt, throttle out :p
     
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  18. tducey

    tducey Well-Known Member

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    Never rode a motorcycle in my life, all I'll say to anyone here who has 1 is to be careful.
     
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  19. oregano

    oregano really wants a solar panel and a AGM battery

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    @Pats, even though other countries make excellent motorcycles, namely Germany and Japan, with Italy bringing up the rear, those places don't have the motorcycle culture that the US does. The US has a whole what I call "the cult of the vagabond", the view of the rootless traveler as a noble figure who does good for his fellow man while asking nothing in return. In Europe the vagabond has been hated and feared for many centuries, including the Rom (Gypsies) on the Continent and the Travelers in the Brittanic Islands. The US is exactly the opposite, possibly because we historically had plenty of land and thus never had the "landed gentry" of Europe with claims to estates going back to the post-Rome era. Outside of motorcycle culture, there are other vagabond cults in the US, such as hitchhikers. Then of course there was the "trucker" culture of the 1970s, which sprang up after the Interstate Highways were largely completed in the early 1970s. The iconic movie here is Smokey and the Bandit, with Burt Reynolds as the working class hero.
     
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  20. Pats

    Pats Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Funny, I lived on a truck for a while, too. lol We drove for North American Van Lines until I had to come off the truck to have a baby - 1985. He still drives a truck and after our divorce I would still take short trips with him now and then on the truck. I might still would if he didn't have his 'friends' with him. Oh well.
    Remember the song "Convoy"?