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What does "okay" mean?

foliodoe

I'm living my whole life at once.
Someone I've been talking to that I really like said "Okay" to me today. Twice in a row.
What does that mean? Is she angry? I don't know what to say. I've been ignoring her all day.
Her last "Okay" is just hanging there. What should I do?
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I sometimes find a need to listen to voice inflections when it comes to that word. Which can have somewhat different meanings depending on exactly how it's said.

oh-kay = OK. Acknowledged. Affirmative. I agree.
ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh-kaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy = skepticism
okay= "grand" in Irish. LOL...


Then again, some people use the term "okay" the way certain easterners might say "forgetaboutit". :rolleyes:
 
Last edited:

foliodoe

I'm living my whole life at once.
She asked me a question, I answered it and she said "Okay. Glad I asked."
Then I gave a little more info and she just said "Okay."
Is she angry? Or is she actually glad she asked because my answer was satisfactory?
 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
Judge commented very well. In Australia the term is still seen as an Americanism although it's in common use here. Sometimes the accents and emphasis are quite subtle and not easy to pick up but here it quite often means "I think you're full of it but I'm not prepared to start an argument about it.".

With an Aussie comments like "She's apples." or "It's all good." are more trustworthy.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
She asked me a question, I answered it and she said "Okay. Glad I asked."
Then I gave a little more info and she just said "Okay."
Is she angry? Or is she actually glad she asked because my answer was satisfactory?
I'd sense anger or frustration only if they accent the second syllable somewhat louder.
 

Lobelty

Member
I don’t think you’d have to worry much. At least how I’d use it, okay just means “I understood what you said and it’s fine”. So the first okay was probably just to show you that you answered her question.
Then the second okay she probably just didn’t really know what to say. You probably answered her question with your first answer and then the extra information was understood, but not really needed.
 

Shamar

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Someone I've been talking to that I really like said "Okay" to me today. Twice in a row.
What does that mean? Is she angry? I don't know what to say. I've been ignoring her all day.
Her last "Okay" is just hanging there. What should I do?
"Okay" can mean agreement, disagreement, command, demand, acquiescence, no problem, confusion, or absolutely nothing. It is a sound people make to say "Pay attention to my tone of voice, body language, and facial expression if you want to know what I mean." In other words, to me, it means absolutely nothing.
 

autism-and-autotune

A musical mind with recent revelations
Someone I've been talking to that I really like said "Okay" to me today. Twice in a row.
What does that mean? Is she angry? I don't know what to say. I've been ignoring her all day.
Her last "Okay" is just hanging there. What should I do?
I often use single-answer words to mean more than that one word, especially communicated in tone of voice. While I'm ravenous and trying to gorge myself at dinner, my fiancee will ask how I'm doing. "Fine," I'll say in a hurried tone, frantic and my mind far away. How can the fact that I'm not really fine not be obvious? If I'm tired and withdrawn, I know it's written on my face and in my body language--but how isn't it obvious?

It's frustrating how single words which mean one thing can actually be the most vague.
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
Staff member
V.I.P Member
It is a word with so many different contextual meanings. So there really needs to be more context offered here to form an opinion on what it means.
 

Luca

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I usually use it to mean “Agreed” or “understood.”
But yeah, we need more context for this situation.
 

330

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I know what ok means in mr mackey’s language. mkay means got it, agreed, understood, deal, etc. the word mkay is so much better mkay

Agreed!
Or we could all agree to get rid of the “O” and just say K

I think the O is not serving a great purpose in this situation
 

Aneka

Well-Known Member
Judge commented very well. In Australia the term is still seen as an Americanism although it's in common use here. Sometimes the accents and emphasis are quite subtle and not easy to pick up but here it quite often means "I think you're full of it but I'm not prepared to start an argument about it.".

With an Aussie comments like "She's apples." or "It's all good." are more trustworthy.
I don't understand the Aussie language at all. You have developed a secret code.
I wonder is there a dictionary for Aussie phrases? Would be cool
 

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