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What cultural/ethnic/nation-named things are called by the people themselves...

Greatshield17

Claritas Prayer Group#9435
What are things named after various peoples, nations, ethnicities etc. called by their native people? Canadian bacon is called back-bacon here and I think other English-speaking countries; if I remember correctly, it got its name because it there was once a shortage of back-bacon in the US and so they had to imported it from Canada, although I think it actually came from England, not Canada (again if I remember correctly) and simply passed through here on its way to the US. I remember one time hearing what a Dutch-angle is called by the Dutch, but I forget what it was.

What about other things like a French Drain?
 
What are things named after various peoples, nations, ethnicities etc. called by their native people? Canadian bacon is called back-bacon here and I think other English-speaking countries; if I remember correctly, it got its name because it there was once a shortage of back-bacon in the US and so they had to imported it from Canada, although I think it actually came from England, not Canada (again if I remember correctly) and simply passed through here on its way to the US. I remember one time hearing what a Dutch-angle is called by the Dutch, but I forget what it was.

What about other things like a French Drain?
I don't know about the other things (other than I like back/Canadian bacon), but I do know the french drain was invented/popularized by a man named French.
 
Canadian Bacon is the name of a product around here that looks more like small circle cutouts of ham. I’m not sure if that’s what you’re referring to or if that’s something else.
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Cornish Pasties

In the UK it's illegal to call a pasty made anywhere else in the UK a Cornish pasty. They have to be mad in Cornwall to qualify.
 
Canadian Bacon is the name of a product around here that looks more like small circle cutouts of ham. I’m not sure if that’s what you’re referring to or if that’s something else.
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To people from Ontario, that is the wierd food that American's think of as Canadian Bacon. It has the relationship to real Canadian bacon that Taco Bell has to Mexican cucina.

Here is the real stuff. The taste and texture is so different from those industrial disks of pork.
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Cornish Pasties

In the UK it's illegal to call a pasty made anywhere else in the UK a Cornish pasty. They have to be mad in Cornwall to qualify.
With the Welsh miners who came to the Midwest, the Pasty quickly followed and has become associated with the culture of Michigan's Upper Peninsula
 
@Greatshield17 Can you think of some things that are called "American" in other parts of the world but might be called something different in America? Like the "Canadian bacon" example.
 
American cheese, Swiss cheese, Brussels sprouts, Swiss chard, Italian cream pie, French onion soup, English peas - there must the hundreds of names for things that are associated with particular countries or cities.

What Americans call "Canadian bacon" is simply uncured bacon made with pork tenderloin rather than American style of cured bacon which is made from the belly of a hog.
 
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"The Sicilian Defense is the most popular response to White's 1.e4. Employed by masters and beginners alike, the Sicilian Defense is a reputable and positionally sound opening. Still, the Sicilian is a combative opening that tends to lead to dynamic and sharp positions." (wiki)
 
American cheese, Swiss cheese, Brussels sprouts, Swiss chard, Italian cream pie, French onion soup, English peas - there must the hundreds of names for things that are associated with particular countries or cities.

What Americans call "Canadian bacon" is simply uncured bacon made with pork tenderloin rather than American style of cured bacon which is made from the belly of a hog.
Real Canadian Bacon is wet cured in brine and sugar. I have never experienced Peameal Bacon in America unless bringing it home from Windsor, Ontario.
 
I always also like the term 'Sicilian Vespers'. Which means Sicilian evening prayers.

"On Easter Monday (30 March) 1282, at the Church of the Holy Spirit just outside Palermo, at evening prayer (vespers), a Frenchman harassed a Sicilian woman. Accounts differ as to what the harassment entailed, who the woman was, and who the Frenchman was.[1]

This single event led to the massacre of four thousand Frenchmen over the course of the next six weeks."

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@Tom I like Sicily, it might have been one of the most culturally-rich places in the Middle Ages; I want to find a book on Medieval Sicily sometime.
 
@Tom I like Sicily, it might have been one of the most culturally-rich places in the Middle Ages; I want to find a book on Medieval Sicily sometime.

I learned a lot about medieval Sicily by listening to an recent Audio book on the Normans. Much of it concerned the Norman take over of Sicily. It does have a amazingly diverse history with occupations by Greeks, Carthaginians, Romans, Saracens/North Africans, Normans and Germans (I think). I believe I gave it to my son but I'll see if I can look up the name and author.

It became a little more interesting when my brother did that DNA genome project thing. We knew we were part Italian, but the genome revealed also Sicilian, Greek, North African and Arab. My Mom would have had a heart attack had she still been alive and learned that. She thought she was 100% Neapolitan and hated Siciilians. :D

P.S. Richard the Lionheart even got involved and did some fighting on the island on his way to the crusade.
 
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