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Walking and Hiking

Greatshield17

Claritas Prayer Group#9435
How many of you like walking and hiking? I want to get out more this year, and do more walking and hiking.

What kind of stuff do you see on your walks and hikes, and what do you like to see? I would share some pictures from my walks or hikes, but previous my laptop broke down, and I'm now using an older laptop and have difficulty getting onto my iCloud to get my photos.
 
Hiking, biking and running. We saw the Ruins of Zog, while hiking a few weeks ago. Here's a video about them (video not mine).

I'll take some of my own photo's next time I'm somewhere interesting.
 
Interesting,

I remember watching a documentary about the attempted Italian Invasion of Greece sometime last summer I think, and it caused me to briefly read over the Kingdom of Albania and King Zog.

There are a couple of ruins in my home region that I've been wanting to visit for sometime now.
 
I like walking. I like to have a large scale map and/or a walk route with me, unless it's a waymarked trail, as it takes me some time to learn a walk, even if I've done it a few times, I can't easily visualise it in my mind until I am quite familiar with it.

I was in Scotland in the autumn, up as far as John o Groats, it was a beautiful coast, with the Orkney Islands visible across the sea, and seals playing in the sea. We saw a group of seals that liked to rest on a little island just within a river estuary at low tide.

We had some good walks and looked at ancient cairns and stones. I like to go to castles and ancient sites, thinking about the people who were there hundreds or thousands of years ago. I am a member of the National Trust and of English Heritage. I love coastal walks and beaches too.
 
I love walks and light hikes - I have difficulty with hiking downhill so I will do uphill only if it's to a summit where there's a gondola or service road I can take down.

For me, it's about getting out of the city and into the wilderness. There's a certain calm about wandering in the forest, or just sitting beside a stream, river, or other body of water with a good book.

If I were to pick a single hike that best meets my criteria of a good walk, it would be Johnston Canyon & Ink Pots in the Canadian Rockies.

At 12 km / 7 mi round-trip, it packs in a canyon, river, waterfalls, forest and finally, alpine meadows.

A superb half-day must-do when visiting Banff.

The Ink Pots Hike via Johnston Canyon - Hike Bike Travel has some lovely photos.

Here's one of my own:
View media item 14014
 
Just back from a 6.6 km walk, most days I walk around in urban areas, took 93 photos today... As some know I mostly do people related photography, street photography, people watching... One photo from two days ago, a man taking a painted buffalo skull to his office...

Street Portrait 17.jpg
 
I am a member of the National Trust and of English Heritage. I love coastal walks and beaches too.
I've been planning of looking into and/or joining organizations like that, especially local ones; Covid delayed me doing that last year, now I've got a long list of things I want to do, including looking into and possibly joining societies like that.
 
I walk and run a lot. I have seen many things. Deer, and even a white deer, rabbits, wild turkeys, coyotes, birds, raccoons, cats, various trees, lightening (almost struck twice), sleet, lots of rain, snow, flooding, friends, spiders, snakes, flowers, trash, stars, various moon phases, amazing sunrises and sunsets, a strange dog with a number shaved into its fur, the President of the USA getting into a helicopter (Clinton), and once there was even a dead body on a path where a sad man shot himself. It was very disturbing. I did not see him, only the screen shielding his body. Later, I laid flowers there. If I think of any more, I will post!
 
Yes, I like walking, in my case, mainly for mushrooms or some of the other edible bounty nature has to offer.
 
I don't think walking can be beaten :)

Aside from the list of health benefits it's something we can make completely our own.
Set our own pace. Take in our own sights and sounds.
Use it for our own interests such as nature, photography, architecture, pondering problems, mulling over theories, practising mindfulness, listening to podcasts and so on.
Walking doesn't hurry us along and we have all the time in the world to process and appreciate.

I never have to justify or debate my interpretation of what's before me and can be completely myself on a walk,
nature doesn't judge and there's no highfalutin pontification,
only the freedom to just 'be'
 
I love walks and light hikes - I have difficulty with hiking downhill so I will do uphill only if it's to a summit where there's a gondola or service road I can take down.

For me, it's about getting out of the city and into the wilderness. There's a certain calm about wandering in the forest, or just sitting beside a stream, river, or other body of water with a good book.

If I were to pick a single hike that best meets my criteria of a good walk, it would be Johnston Canyon & Ink Pots in the Canadian Rockies.

At 12 km / 7 mi round-trip, it packs in a canyon, river, waterfalls, forest and finally, alpine meadows.

A superb half-day must-do when visiting Banff.

The Ink Pots Hike via Johnston Canyon - Hike Bike Travel has some lovely photos.

Here's one of my own:
View media item 14014
I need to add that to the places I want see when things open up.

How accessible is it? I live near a glacier that I've been wanting to visit, but the access road isn't paved and you need a 4x4 to get through it which, we don't have.
 
I need to add that to the places I want see when things open up.

How accessible is it? I live near a glacier that I've been wanting to visit, but the access road isn't paved and you need a 4x4 to get through it which, we don't have.

If it's safe enough for walking on (ie. other vehicles), and depending on how long the road is... I would just walk up there
 
I need to add that to the places I want see when things open up.

How accessible is it? I live near a glacier that I've been wanting to visit, but the access road isn't paved and you need a 4x4 to get through it which, we don't have.

The entrance is right on the Bow River Parkway, which is fully paved and accessible year round. The trail itself isn't wheelchair friendly but it's flat enough that it's suitable for most people. The trail is also used in the winter as a snowshoe trail.
 
I love walking, but I'm a bit afraid of walking around people due to being bullied, hit on, and body shamed on walks when I was younger. So I look for mostly deserted trails, etc., instead of walking around my neighborhood.
 
During the couple months that we were quarantined my mom and I started taking walks. It's a rural area, so fresh air and a nice view of the mountains. But then it started getting too hot for it. It's still a good way to relax a little when my anxiety or depression kicks in.

And when I was a kid my dad would take me and my brother hiking almost every week. Peace and quiet, occasional animals, and just really nice woods and fields scenery.
 
Walking and hiking are how I meditate. I take my dog with me to a trail by the river at least once a week. Getting out of the city for a bit is pleasant too. It's the only thing that can get me out of bed early in the morning.
 
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