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Undiagnosed job difficulties

D'Andre

Well-Known Member
Not sure if anyone started a chat on this, but I'm expected to function in so many sensor-heavy conditions and very little understanding or support. My job is not even that bad but I'm exhausted after work because of the interactions.
 

Yeshuasdaughter

You know, that one lady we met that one time.
V.I.P Member
It's one of the big triggers for autistic people. I bet most people on here can relate. Some people here even get SSI/SSD because of it.
 

Neonatal RRT

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Not sure if anyone started a chat on this, but I'm expected to function in so many sensor-heavy conditions and very little understanding or support. My job is not even that bad but I'm exhausted after work because of the interactions.

You and me both. I'm a respiratory therapist (all things airways, lungs, and breathing) in one of the largest neonatal centers in the world,...110 beds,...but often more than that. The intensive care unit is a cacophony of alarms, phone calls, texts, interruptions,...frequently 2-4 emergent things in your queue,...physician educational rounds (we are a training hospital), nursing and respiratory care students,...going to deliveries of babies (pulled away without notice),...running emergent labs (pulled away without notice),...the list goes on and on and on. You can't plan your day even though you are expected to complete a long list of tasks during your 12-hr shift,...and no coverage for meals.

I have learned to sneak away into a bathroom or locker room for 5-10 minutes,...collect myself,...then head back out to the chaos. Some days it's just 2 or 3 times,...and other days,...I need those mini breaks 4-6 times per shift. Yes,...it is mentally,...and physically exhausting. My knees and ankles are often quite sore and stiff. Work more than 2 or 3 days in a row,...the first day off work often means taking a 2-3hr nap during the day,...it's not a "productive" day at all.

It has always been busy,...I've never known it not,...but CoVID has gutted the health care worker ranks,...our department lost 40% of it's staff,...we are running around knowing we can't possibly get all our work done. We have new people joining our ranks, but realistically, it may take another 2-3 years to get our staffing levels back to baseline,...and that's assuming people don't resign in the mean time.
 

D'Andre

Well-Known Member
wow that has got to be tough. my hats off to you for all you do for people. right on for putting your sanity first and taking those breaks.
 

Neonatal RRT

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I think it is important for autistics and neurotypicals to understand that there is a "spectrum" of social functioning, tolerance,...and coping mechanisms,... within the autism "spectrum". Everyone is an individual. In other words, I would not want my co-workers,...who know me as an autistic individual,...to come to the false conclusion that all autistics can function in a high stress, environmentally stimulating, highly social environment,...or worse, interpret "autism" as simply a "neurodivergent label". They don't see me slipping away to do my little breaks,...I kind of make sure of that. On the other hand,...I also don't want autistic individuals, their parents, their therapists, their counselors, to automatically disregard the idea that an autistic individual cannot do a job or pursue a career they desire,...simply by virtue of "the condition".
 

D'Andre

Well-Known Member
I think it is important for autistics and neurotypicals to understand that there is a "spectrum" of social functioning, tolerance,...and coping mechanisms,... within the autism "spectrum". Everyone is an individual. In other words, I would not want my co-workers,...who know me as an autistic individual,...to come to the false conclusion that all autistics can function in a high stress, environmentally stimulating, highly social environment,...or worse, interpret "autism" as simply a "neurodivergent label". They don't see me slipping away to do my little breaks,...I kind of make sure of that. On the other hand,...I also don't want autistic individuals, their parents, their therapists, their counselors, to automatically disregard the idea that an autistic individual cannot do a job or pursue a career they desire,...simply by virtue of "the condition".

Well said!
 

RotanotNino

Active Member
Tolerance can develop just like it does for serrano and habanero peppers or lots of other things. That time after work is good to recuperate.
I have had people call me on the weekend in the past, while I was still working rather than retired, and upon being asked if I was busy and replying "No" had them start telling me what We were going to be doing since I wasn't busy.
After that happening a couple of times I developed a habit of telling people who asked if I was busy that No, I am not doing anything, and I don't intend to do anything either. just to make it real clear that I was in no mood to be drafted on a moment's notice. I still do that when I don't feel up to any activity.
 

AprilR

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I am having a lot of difficulty as well. Working in a loud/hectic office is sensory hell and concentrating/dealing with stress is also so hard.
 

D'Andre

Well-Known Member
Tolerance can develop just like it does for serrano and habanero peppers or lots of other things. That time after work is good to recuperate.
I have had people call me on the weekend in the past, while I was still working rather than retired, and upon being asked if I was busy and replying "No" had them start telling me what We were going to be doing since I wasn't busy.
After that happening a couple of times I developed a habit of telling people who asked if I was busy that No, I am not doing anything, and I don't intend to do anything either. just to make it real clear that I was in no mood to be drafted on a moment's notice. I still do that when I don't feel up to any activity.
YES!!
 

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