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UK research request- the language we use to talk about autism

JuliaB

New Member
Hi,

I am currently carrying out research to learn more about autistic people’s preferences for the language used to communicate about autism in the UK and whether there is a relationship between language, stigma, and social identity. There is currently a lack of research in this area and it has been suggested that simple changes to the language used may help to reduce stigma within society.

https://robertgordonuniversity.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/autism-stigma-and-identity-language-preferences-and-wide

If you live in the UK, are over 18 have a spare 5/10 minutes to complete the anonymous survey above to share your opinion, or if you are able to share it with others, I would be so very appreciative. There is more information about the survey on the link and also a link at the end to enter a prize draw to win £10 Amazon vouchers.

Thank you so much for reading,

Julia
 

Raggamuffin

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Changing how people choose to speak isn't what I'd think to be a simple change. Often when new terms, or new faux pas are brought to the public's attention - a lot of people just scoff at the idea their vocabulary should adapted to suit, and some of them will be the types who will stigmatise others.

Ed
 

Alaric593

Well-Known Member
Changing how people choose to speak isn't what I'd think to be a simple change. Often when new terms, or new faux pas are brought to the public's attention - a lot of people just scoff at the idea their vocabulary should adapted to suit, and some of them will be the types who will stigmatise others.

Ed

And changing the language doesn't change the condition so I'm unsure of the point. Behavior is what matters, not words.
 

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