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Turning Off Bitlocker Encryption Windows 11

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Ok, so it's clear Microsoft will be enabling BitLocker encryption in their massive 24H2 update coming up in the near future. Though with an anticipated perfomance hit of as much as 45%, I somehow doubt this function will be particularly useful, especially to gamers who want to get every ounce of power out of both their hardware as well as the operating system. So here's someone advertising how to go about turning off BitLocker Encryption.

All fine and well, though as usual it seems like yet another way for Microsoft to absolutely force users into securing a dreaded Microsoft Account if they haven't already. All to obtain a key that can formally unlock the encryption. There is also an alternative presentation in how one can go into the registry to edit this function and turn it off that way, though I seldom recommend to any noob to go into the registry unless you know exactly what you are doing, and how a specific function works. (It's just too easy to bring down the whole OS unless you are really accustomed to making registry edits).

It is interesting- almost ominous to see how aggressive they remain about users being forced to have such an account. But at least you can turn the damn thing off, which strikes me as a bigger benefit than having to maintain one of those "Microsoft Accounts".

 
I still feel smug. :D

Absolutely. The more I study Windows 11 as it is presently, the more I appreciate Linux.

I'm still wavering over whether it's even worth the trouble to use Windows solely as a gaming platform. It seems as time goes on, Microsoft devises new ways to spoil their own product.

I feel sorry for those users who have no choice in installing this upgrade, forcing everyone into having encryption that they may not even want or need, at the potential cost of a loss of an alleged 45% performance of the operating system itself. So it may be imperative for them to be able to disable BitLocker Encryption altogether.

I just hope at least some of them are paying attention when 24H2 shows up.
 
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I feel sorry for those users who have no choice
I have little sympathy for them. Most people willfully decide to not think for themselves and will just keep doing whatever popular media tells them to. In doing so they not only allow themselves to become entrapped and enslaved, they encourage and reward that kind of behaviour in large corporations.

When that disaster called Win8 came out I expected that people would leave Microsoft in droves, but no, most people are happy being victims.
 
When that disaster called Win8 came out I expected that people would leave Microsoft in droves, but no, most people are happy being victims.

Windows 8 wasn't all bad. It provided an abundant supply of cheap but new notebook computers, and a few tablets (altogether I think around 6 or 7 machines) that I installed Linux on. It's gotten a little more expensive to buy the hardware I want these days, so I'm hoping that Windows 11 is the new Windows 8 pretty soon.
 
It provided an abundant supply of cheap but new notebook computers, and a few tablets (altogether I think around 6 or 7 machines) that I installed Linux on.
I did the same, in the remote region I was living in at the time I had 80% of the population running Linux. Most people were amazed at how much quicker and more reliable it is.
 
Most people were amazed at how much quicker and more reliable it is.

Lately it's been a concern of what it would be like to indulge in Windows again, when I'm well aware of how fast and efficient Linux has been. Playing specific games through Windows may simply not be worth it.

Guess I'll have to wait a bit longer to see the fallout that happens once Windows 11 users begin downloading 24H2 and must deal with BitLocker. Could get ugly.

"Decision, decisions". :rolleyes:
 
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Lately it's been a concern of what it would be like to indulge in Windows again, when I'm well aware of how fast and efficient Linux has been. Playing specific games through Windows may simply not be worth it.
I could never go back to that again. The constant virus threats, the nagging to pay for stuff, and the lack of stability and reliability.

And it's only older games that are a struggle to run under Linux, I've had no trouble at all with games later than 2010.

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An interesting development. I found a YouTube presentation by (Windows,computers and Technology) who just noticed that while the dreaded 24H2 update was processed on his Windows 11 Pro, it did not automatically turn on BitLocker Encryption. With him subsequently pondering what might have caused this, though not having an answer. With Microsoft leaving users in the dark for now.

Could it possibly be that Microsoft did the right thing and at the last minute decided not to force it on users? To install it, but not turn it on? I want to laugh and say, "Hell no, that's not their style". But who knows?

It would be nice though if Microsoft really did backtrack and not force BitLocker on all users. Though I also am aware that the vast majority of Windows 11 users have not yet experienced the 24H2 update that has so many changes. I do know that Microsoft formally acknowledged some two weeks ago that this was going to be a mandatory install .

One thing for sure, if it does install and turn it on, you'd better retrieve your key from Microsoft so you have control over it. Otherwise users can be locked out of their own computer.

Hazah! I just found the presentation:


Another one of his presentations, reminding users to check your privacy settings to see if they have changed after installing the 24H2 update:

 
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