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Thoughts on the Resurrected Body in the World to Come

Greatshield17

Claritas Prayer Group#9435
The Feast of the Assumption is coming up, (not that I want this to devolve into a debate about the Assumption, or soul sleep which may come up.) and I have been thinking a lot about the Resurrection of the Body in the World to Come. Recently I've been coming across a lot of information on the bodily aspects of Aspergers, we seem to be very sensitive to bodily things, touch and feelings. (which we Catholics believe to be a bodily thing) When I think of and seek Heaven now, I tend to think more now of the World to Come, as oppose to, for lack of a better term, heaven-Heaven. Not that I don't think about and seek that heaven, but the idea of being in union with God and contemplating Him, while cut-off from my five senses via physical death, is very hard for me to wrap my mind around; and also I'm an idealist (which may be come among as Aspies) and human beings are meant to be united with our bodies; it's part of our nature and thus, the ideal.

Being re-united with my body in the World to Come really appeals to sensory temperament, what are your thoughts on the Resurrected Body in the World to Come, as a Catholic, Orthodox, Protestant, Jew &c.?
 
I'm confused by it. God could restore a body that was turned to ash (cremation) and perhaps scattered on the four winds, but what about people whose bodies were an impediment to them when alive? People born with massive deformities, missing limbs, etc? What if they wouldn't want their body in Heaven?

If the answer is that God would make their body perfect and give their body things that it never had before (e.g. limbs, etc) then why the need for resurrecting the body and reuniting with the same body at all? Why not a whole new body?
 
...but the idea of being in union with God and contemplating Him, while cut-off from my five senses via physical death, is very hard for me to wrap my mind around; and also I'm an idealist (which may be come among as Aspies) and human beings are meant to be united with our bodies; it's part of our nature and thus, the ideal.

Interesting point of view - a couple of thoughts
- Jesus told Mary not to touch him at the graveside
- he told Thomas to touch his wounds
- if Thomas touched Jesus, would He feel it?
- he touched the bread at Emmaus
- did Jesus taste the fish he ate at the sea of Galilee?
- he did hear the chat of the disciples on the way to Emmaus
- he did see them too and walk the way, presumably avoiding tripping up on loose stones
- did he smell anything after his resurrection? I don't know about that one.


My conclusion is that Jesus obviously did see, hear, touch so for him to smell and taste seems likely, so I think that we will have our 5 senses intact (if not perfected).
 
If the answer is that God would make their body perfect and give their body things that it never had before (e.g. limbs, etc) then why the need for resurrecting the body and reuniting with the same body at all? Why not a whole new body?
Because our bodies are part of who we are as human beings, as I mentioned above, human beings are not supposed to have theirs souls separated from their bodies, that is a punishment for Original Sin. Saint Thomas Aquinas was actually reluctant to call Jesus human on Holy Saturday, "except in the case of a dead man," because of this reasoning.

I'm confused by it. God could restore a body that was turned to ash (cremation) and perhaps scattered on the four winds, but what about people whose bodies were an impediment to them when alive? People born with massive deformities, missing limbs, etc? What if they wouldn't want their body in Heaven?
In addition to what was discussed above, it should that the martyrs will have the wounds of their martyrdom with them in the World to Come, only these wounds will be shining with glory. Thus if these people in question, use their deformities as part of their sanctification, they will actually have these deformities with them in the World to Come, only they will be shining with glory and won't impede them. I actually with me the four gifts a saint will receive in the Resurrection, I'll post it in a bit let me just respond to the next post.
 
What is all this talking about? Feast of Assumption? World to Come? Resurrection of The New Body?

What is this, Akira IRL?
 
Interesting point of view - a couple of thoughts
- Jesus told Mary not to touch him at the graveside
- he told Thomas to touch his wounds
- if Thomas touched Jesus, would He feel it?
- he touched the bread at Emmaus
- did Jesus taste the fish he ate at the sea of Galilee?
- he did hear the chat of the disciples on the way to Emmaus
- he did see them too and walk the way, presumably avoiding tripping up on loose stones
- did he smell anything after his resurrection? I don't know about that one.


My conclusion is that Jesus obviously did see, hear, touch so for him to smell and taste seems likely, so I think that we will have our 5 senses intact (if not perfected).
But Jesus was Resurrected from the dead, He actually had His body when He did those things He wasn't a disembodied spirit. We will be when we die and, please God, die in a state of Grace; we won't get our bodies back until the World to Come.
 
What is all this talking about? Feast of Assumption? World to Come? Resurrection of The New Body?

What is this, Akira IRL?
We're talking about Christian Eschatology, (Catholic and Orthodox Eschatology, in the case of the Assumption) what happens when we die and what our ultimate destiny is. It is the belief of Catholics, Orthodox and most Protestants that when we die, if we die in a State of Grace, not only will we go to Heaven but that, after the End Times God will restore the Earth to its Edenic State, and those who died in a State of Grace will be only to enjoy this New Earth in their resurrected bodies.
 
Here are the Four Gifts of the Incarnation:

1. Impassibility: Needless to say, there will be no suffering in the World to Come, our bodies will not suffer anything, no weariness nor hunger nor thirst. Our bodies will be animate by God Who is Life Himself, and will never age nor lose that liveliness.

2. Subtelty: Our bodies cannot be obstructed by anything, we can even go through walls; just as Christ did when He entered the locked room where the Apostles were hiding.

3. Agility: We can travel anywhere we want by the power of our thoughts, we just need to think and will that location and we'll be there. We can also levitate, fly, and do any bodily move we wish just by thinking and willing it.

4. Clarity: This is probably the most interesting of all the gifts for me as an Aspie, Clarity. In addition to our bodies having a glorified state, we will also have a perfect understanding of ourselves and each other in the New Earth, and be able to communicate with each other better than the most socially-skilled NT on this current earth. Perhaps we can say that there is neither Aspergers nor Neurotypicalism in Heaven; but I'm no Theologian or expert in any sense, on this stuff.
 
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