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Taking things for granted

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by SimonSays, Feb 25, 2021.

  1. SimonSays

    SimonSays A work in progress

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    I went the whole of last summer without a fridge/freezer. After my mum died, I only ever kept a few things in there, and one day it just seemed such a waste of electricity. I kept almost nothing in the freezer either, except a stock of frozen sweet grapes; thirst quenching, hydrating, nutritional. Never becoming solid (the sweeter they are the softer they stay), and to me are always delicious on a hot summer’s day.

    I knew I could walk to the shops more often, about an hour’s round trip, and that ensured that if I felt like something; a yoghurt or an ice-lolly, I couldn’t just walk 20 feet to get it, I had to make an effort, exercise, or let the idea go.

    I did this in part, because I knew when it was time to go I wouldn’t have access to one for a while, and I wanted to get used to it rather than just take it for granted right up to the end. But there would be no point doing that if I felt I was suffering without it, especially as flipping a switch would’ve changed it back instantly. As much as I love frozen grapes, I knew I didn’t have to have them. I knew from my own experience that plenty of people live without fridge/freezers in the world. Most are well aware of the lovely coolness these appliance bring, but for one reason or another, don’t or can’t have one.

    It is easy to take things for granted. Rarely do we know what it is like to go from typical house dwelling comforts to a much more basic existence. Not having a fridge for many would be quite a challenge, not having a washing machine, requires trips to the launderette which is an inconvenience, resulting in perhaps wearing the same clothes for longer as a result. Not having access to a bath or shower, requiring a new approach to the idea of what is clean, what feels clean, what is acceptable and the benefits of baby wipes. Not having a toilet, for a man, means easily filling up a plastic bottle and then pouring it away outside. Or squatting over a bucket containing a bin bag, then dropping everything into a dog poo bin afterwards. Or taking a walk to a pub or library when they first open and appreciating an actual toilet fresh and clean.

    I lived like that in my van for a few years and it took me a while to recognise the change in me as I learned how to do what I needed to do to look after myself. I really appreciated the use of a shower, especially if one was offered to me unexpectedly out of kindness.

    It is so easy to take things for granted, to feel entitled. If I ever do, other things start to become problems instead. I learn to accept these challenges, overcome things slowly with evolving ideas using creativity. I understand how not taking things for granted really teaches me something. And it is a good lesson to learn.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2021
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  2. AprilR

    AprilR Well-Known Member

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    This is so true. As soon as you take some things granted and feel comfortable with what you have, you start wanting more.

    But it is very much possible to be happy with very little.
     
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  3. Gift2humanity

    Gift2humanity Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Of all the times of year to go without a fridge freezer you did not have one in the summer.
    I bought a fridge freezer Over a year ago and I’ve got peace of mind because I have a onesie an extended one which obviously costs but it means somebody will come out and fix it.
    Good idea getting yourself used to the idea of not having a fridge freezer before you go. Where were you headed?
    I have a Laundrette that comes and picks up my laundry The man is very friendly and goes out of his way to help.
    Yes it easy to take things for granted.
     
  4. SimonSays

    SimonSays A work in progress

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    Wouldn't be a challenge in winter as I'd just put things on the window ledge, or in a carrier bag fixed to the inner handle with the bag on the outside.
    Homeless, and a hostel in central London.
    That sounds really good. It can be a bit of a schlep carrying washing, especially without a car. Again, I'd see it as a way to get me outside for practical reasons, a bit more exercise, fresh air, but if it's cold and wet out, I would love that someone comes to get it, I give a few more of those things with the queen on them, and they come back clean and fresh. Nice.
     
  5. Gift2humanity

    Gift2humanity Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Yeah Winter is a lot easier regarding fridges.
    Is that where you are now, or are you in a shared house?
    The laundrette is in the next town but they seem to put love into the job, returning duvet in a bag. Some things have shrunk though, not many.
     
  6. SimonSays

    SimonSays A work in progress

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    Shared house.
    Or maybe you've grown ;)
     
  7. Gift2humanity

    Gift2humanity Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Some woolly hats have come out funny but they still keep my head warm.
     
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  8. Wolfsage

    Wolfsage In training to be Wolf King.

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    To true. Weather and life has a habit or reminding you.
     
  9. SusanLR

    SusanLR Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I've lived with modern conveniences and without.
    Never been homeless, but, as long as I have a van, it isn't impossible to live that way.
    Didn't have water or electric hook up in it, but, again as @SimonSays, there are ways around it.
    As long as you've got enough money to get gas and keep the van in repair, nature provides and so
    does WaWa.;)

    I lived with my Grandmother in the country for a few years as a kid and she had an old farmhouse
    with nothing modern.
    Wood cooking and heating, an Ice Box with a chunk of ice, wringer washer, dry your clothes on the line,
    no electric, kerosene lamps, a well, an outhouse and indoor pots for night and I don't mean pots and pans!
    She canned, had a root celler and a big outdoor black kettle to cook outside in.
    Chickens for food and eggs. An acre of vegetables. A huge walnut tree.
    A country general store not far away for necessities.

    Yeah, think Beverly Hillbilly style. :D
     
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  10. SimonSays

    SimonSays A work in progress

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    Yes. I was parked not far from natural springs, but sometimes the tap in the park where the gardener connected his hose did just fine. Electricity came from the sun via solar panel, stored in a battery for when there wasn't any.
    Love it. I wish I had grown up like that.