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Surviving CoVID-19 and being vaccinated shows broad immunity to several variants.

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Neonatal RRT, Sep 15, 2021.

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  1. Neonatal RRT

    Neonatal RRT Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Study:
    Longitudinal analysis shows durable and broad immune memory after SARS-CoV-2 infection with persisting antibody responses and memory B and T cells
    DEFINE_ME

    Related article: COVID-19 survivors may possess wide-ranging resistance to the disease | Emory University | Atlanta, GA

    Why should adults with autism be concerned?: Adult autistics aged 40-60 have nearly twice the likelihood of contracting the infection as age matched controls.

    Study:
    COVID-19 Morbidity Among Individuals with Autistic Spectrum Disorder: A Matched Controlled Population-Based Study
    COVID-19 Morbidity Among Individuals with Autistic Spectrum Disorder: A Matched Controlled Population-Based Study

    Just my anecdotal experience, but CoVID-19 infection is nothing like you've had before,...you should be scared,...I was,...sitting on the couch in the middle of the night wondering if I was going to be dead by morning,...no, you can't sleep,...you don't dare. You have these very interesting conversations with yourself,...is my wife going to be OK without me? What will it be like to die?

    People in my life were stunned that a very healthy appearing, muscled-up guy like myself would have the rug pulled out from under him like I did. But, I was male, I was 40-60, and autistic,...with an overactive inflammatory response. I was sick enough to receive convalescent plasma in the emergency room,...I visited twice about a week apart,...very, very close to being admitted. Got oral Prednisone and IV fluids the second visit. I felt like crap,...no words,...yet, somehow not quite sick enough to be admitted,...I cannot imagine how people who did get admitted felt like. That was the end of September 2020,...and I wasn't back to my baseline until March 2021,...between the lung damage and the brain fog I was a mess for a while.

    I found it interesting that these studies came out in July of this year. I did receive my 2 Pfizer vaccines in December. So, hopefully, between actually contracting CoVID-19, receiving convalescent plasma, and the vaccines, I should have this "super" immunity as described in the article above. I am sure the hospital will likely make us get booster shots, as well, if the CDC suggests it.
     
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  2. Ronald Zeeman

    Ronald Zeeman Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    There is more to this virus than meets the eye, we got a lot to learn as time goes by, be safe be vaccinated. Based on what I have seen so far there is a genetic component to whom gets infected.
     
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  3. watersprite

    watersprite inadvertent vagabond V.I.P Member

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    @Neonatal RRT
    • glad you are okay now

    Thanks for the links and first hand information about having Covid-19.

    I was vaccinated (Pfizer) fully as soon as i could after getting back into the States in April 2021. Waiting to see if the booster is recommended for everyone/which groups or what.

    I wonder, & if this is a dumb question mi scusi; 1. if being around someone who’s had it and been vaccinated can give one a weakened virus, & therefore a beneficial result?
    2. Could we end up with populations who stay un-vaccinated which are basically choosing to eventually get wiped out by this virus?

    Also I wonder if we as a group generally are low in vitamin D, & other micro-nutrients vital to the immune system. It helps regulate over-active immune response too from what I understand.
    In other words might be more factors against us.
     
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  4. Magna

    Magna Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Does the Longitudinal Analysis, your first link indicate that an unvaccinated person who gets and recovers from Covid19 has a longer natural immunity than someone does who is vaccinated? Half life of more than 200 days; does that mean natural immunity is likely more than 400 days?
     
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  5. Gerald Wilgus

    Gerald Wilgus Well-Known Member

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    The thing that is scary about SARS-CoV-2 are the antigenic sites on the spike protein. There is a domain that is a superantigen and acts in injuring the immune system to create hyperinflammation. The mode of action is similar to some bacterial antigens that are responsible for toxic shock syndrome. And, like toxic shock, the dysregulation I expect to permanently injure the immune system, both the innate and adaptive immunity.

    With the lung damage if I get COVID i would be unable to dive for the rest of my life.
     
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  6. Streetwise

    Streetwise Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    The most common side effects of prednisolone are insomnia, weight gain, indigestion and sweating a lot. Taking prednisolone can make you more likely to get infections.20 Mar 2020
    The NHS website › medicines › pr...
    Prednisolone: steroid to treat allergies and infections - NHS
     
  7. Gerald Wilgus

    Gerald Wilgus Well-Known Member

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    For your first question . . . it appears that the genetic diversity of the virus from breakthrough infections in vaccinated or immune individuals is greatly reduced compared to non-vaccinated people. Plus the viral load is far less. I would not call that a weakened virus, precisely, but the result is those people are less infectious.

    For your second question, the fundamental lack of responsibility of the unvaccinated population makes me think that SARS-CoV-2 will become endemic in the population. If this occurs, and at the rate of infection in the unvaccinated population, it looks like there is the likelihood that every person in that population will be infected at least once a decade. With the damage to the immune system from each infection, those people will become more vulnerable to other infections and diseases as they age. As this is understood better (I consider all this provisional right now) you can be certain that insurers will take notice and coverage of COVID patients will be affected. Whether or not they will be wiped out I won't speculate.
     
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  8. watersprite

    watersprite inadvertent vagabond V.I.P Member

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    That sounds something like HIV’s effect in humans. (?)
     
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  9. Gerald Wilgus

    Gerald Wilgus Well-Known Member

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    Do you have any information about hetrologous prime and boost? There has been some studies for this, but the only data I've seen so far is reactogenicity after the booster, nothing about immunity. But then, you have had the natural experiment for receiving a hetrologous booster.
     
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  10. Streetwise

    Streetwise Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    MENU
    7 Things You Need to Know About Experiments on Animals and COVID-19


    "The scope and scale of the coronavirus crisis has brought misery to millions of people and changed the way we live and work. Ending this pandemic will also require a paradigm shift within the scientific community.

    Even though much remains uncertain, one thing is clear: Experimenting on animals squanders precious time and resources when both are in short supply.”

    —Dr. Samantha Saunders, a veterinary surgeon at the PETA Foundation (U.K.) who holds a Ph.D. in coronavirology

    FOR MEDIA RESOURCES PODCASTS WARNINGS BY EXPERTS: ANIMAL TESTS

    1. Like all viruses, the novel coronavirus impacts different species differently.
    We know that monkeys infected with COVID-19 don’t develop the severe symptoms that we see in humans.

    When asked about seemingly promising experimental results in rhesus macaques, Dr. Malcolm Martin, a virologist with the National Institutes of Health (NIH), “cautioned that monkeys are different from humans in important ways.”

    end covid-19 experiments on animals
    © iStock.com//Donyanedomam

    This means that findings from other animals may not apply to humans and may instead mislead researchers, squandering valuable time and money and leaving patients waiting for treatments.

    For example, a recent study found that hydroxychloroquine can block SARS-CoV-2 infections in one species of monkey, thanks to a specific enzyme found in that animal. However, humans lack that enzyme—hence, the drug’s failure in clinical trials. Bottom line: Monkeys aren’t good stand-ins for humans.

    2. Experimental vaccines for other coronaviruses offered protection to other animals but failed in humans.
    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged in 2002 and 2012, respectively.

    Animal experimenters have infected mice, ferrets, rhesus macaques, African green monkeys, marmosets, hamsters, camels, rabbits, alpacas, horses, and other animals with these viruses.

    Some resulting experimental vaccines showed promise, producing antibodies that neutralized the viruses. However, none of them were approved for humans.

    3. Experiments on animals divert time and funding from superior, non-animal methods.
    In order to speed up the development of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and NIH greenlit landmark human clinical vaccine trials without first requiring extensive tests on animals.

    Companies are usually required to spend years putting animals through the agony of new product tests before human clinical trials are allowed to begin, even though those tests don’t accurately predict whether a drug will work in humans. NIH itself reports that 95 out of every 100 new drugs that test safe and effective in animal tests fail in humans.


    While the historic decisions by NIH and the FDA won’t stop all tests on animals for the vaccine, they pave the way for safe, straight-to-human vaccine trials.

    4. Injecting the virus into monkeys risks creating a new variant—and the fact that the virus mutates is further evidence that monkeys are bad “models” to use when studying COVID-19.
    Research done by David Matthews, a University of Bristol coronavirologist, definitively shows that the SARS-CoV-2 virus adapts to and mutates in monkey tissues. So monkeys infected with the virus end up with an additional infection that’s the result of the mutation. Commenting on the scientific havoc that this development could produce, Matthews says, “t could again basically make a mess of your vaccine trial by creating anomalous results that you misinterpret


    The experiments were deemed not “essential,” while the animals were considered “extraneous” and expendable.




    6. Around the globe, a number of non-animal tests are already underway, aimed at developing a vaccine or an effective treatment for COVID-19.
    Given the scale and seriousness of this pandemic, researchers can’t afford to waste time conducting useless experiments on animals.

    Check out these innovative, animal-free COVID-19 experiments that allow researchers to avoid cruel, archaic tests on animals in favor of cutting-edge, human-relevant methods.

    7. Thousands of monkeys imprisoned in laboratories are susceptible to contracting the novel coronavirus, and they have no line of defense against it.
    Many novel coronavirus infections have been asymptomatic, thereby increasing the likelihood that lab staff may have already exposed these sensitive animals to the virus. Laboratories could very well become dangerous hotbeds for COVID-19, with a negative impact on experimental results.


    Any experiments conducted on monkeys compromised with the novel coronavirus would be worthless.












    Also of Interest
    Experiments on Animals: Overview‘Guinea Pig’ and ‘COVID Vaccine’ Don’t Belong...PETA Statement: Pfizer Vaccine Data
    © 2021 PETA.
    Edited by me because I know there are many pro(for torture)vivisectionists.
     
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  11. Gerald Wilgus

    Gerald Wilgus Well-Known Member

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    I think that analogy is not far off the mark.
     
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  12. Gerald Wilgus

    Gerald Wilgus Well-Known Member

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    Any researcher can tell you: Mice lie, Monkeys exaggerate.
     
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  13. Gerald Wilgus

    Gerald Wilgus Well-Known Member

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    As a type II diabetic, prednisolone spikes my blood sugar to injurious levels.
     
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  14. Streetwise

    Streetwise Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    And humans cause EXTINCTION
     
  15. Neonatal RRT

    Neonatal RRT Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I don't think it gets into that angle. But this does: Coronavirus Disease 2019
     
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  16. Neonatal RRT

    Neonatal RRT Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Interesting. However, the research posted were human population studies, not about animal testing.
     
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  17. Misery

    Misery Photo-Negative V.I.P Member

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    I always think there's just so much to immune system stuff that either isnt understood, or just has... so many variables. And it seems like it can vary so wildly between individuals.

    As a contrast, me VS my mom. She always just catches everything... every stupid random virus that goes through the area, you know. Basic stuff. Always catches it. Needless to say this had those around her a bit worried when COVID came through, but she is a very responsible person and took all the right steps (and didnt go out much at all). Overall though, yeah, she just catches stuff.

    Whereas I on the other hand just... dont. I remember when the whole thing started, my father, who knows me so darned well, looked at me and said, "Well YOU definitely wont catch it, that's for sure", with generally good basis for that, as he explained.

    And the question is... why? What is the difference? I have no bloody clue. It's just how it is.

    Ironically I'm still a complete hypochondriac, the worst out of the family when it comes to that. No, I dont know why. But it meant that I made absolutely sure to follow all the correct steps to the freaking letter (and then some) during this stupid pandemic. Though, it wasnt JUST about me... I also couldnt risk being a carrier and somehow transferring it to my very vulnerable grandparents. But yeah, I'm always paranoid about health stuff. Always have been, always will be. Which means that yeah, the pandemic has been bloody tough, as anxiety goes. Getting that vaccination was SUCH a freaking load off my back... sorta. Still paranoid. Just not *quite* as anxious.

    I'll be glad to get that freaking booster shot though, whenever it's time to do that.


    Oh, and I see Prednisone was mentioned. I've been on that before (for pain). I refer to them as Hell Pills. Being on those was the single worst experience in my memory... ugh. It was a nightmare that felt like it would never end. I'd never heard of paradoxical insomnia before then. Wish I was still ignorant of it. That wasnt the only side effect.

    I'd already had a general phobia of medications (for literally no reason) and I gotta say, that stuff didnt help that.

    After that month-long ordeal I was put on cyclobenzaprine and Tramadol instead, after a car crash. I still remember, they got me to take the first dose by having the world's most intimidating nurse lady get me into a corner, and she just stood there until I took it. She certainly knew how to deal with reluctant patients.
     
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  18. Neonatal RRT

    Neonatal RRT Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Then, no oral prednisolone for you. However, God forbid, you were in the hospital with an infection and an out-of-control inflammatory response,...they would use corticosteroids and monitor your blood sugar and insulin levels closely.

    I am not diabetic,...and I was into my 3rd week with CoVID, so most of my disease process at that time line was inflammatory. By the 3rd daily dose, I was feeling significantly better, it was what I needed at the time. Timing is critical when using systemic steroids with any infection. You can use them, and they are quite effective, without exacerbating the disease process if timed appropriately. If you are going to use it,...use it on the tail end of the disease process to treat the inflammatory response,...never at the beginning.
     
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  19. Streetwise

    Streetwise Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    The vaccine is supposed to be safer because animals were tortured first but the info I gave says that is incorrect and therefore humans should have that info to make an informed decision and\or pass that info to persons still considering vaccination.
    And as you arent the moderator i'll wait for their judgement
     
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  20. Gerald Wilgus

    Gerald Wilgus Well-Known Member

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    I entered into a serious bout of depression when I had to run large scale experiments on animals. Rats are good models for breast cancer and I was tasked with looking at the mechanisms whereby pregnancy before age 30 in humans confers protection against breast cancer. While trying to work as ethically as possible it was still soul bruising when I had to kill the animals. Other stresses was my keeping the animal caretakers safe as I was utilizing potent carcinogens and radioactive biochemicals. I am not pro vivisection though I reluctantly admit that there are studies that cannot be replicated in vitro.
     
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