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Student Project

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by Morgan Jinks, Feb 11, 2020.

  1. Morgan Jinks

    Morgan Jinks New Member

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    Hi, I am a Product Design student at Wolverhampton University. I am currently in the process of designing a safe zone for autistic children within primary schools. I have created a questionnaire to help me understand what sort of things would be good to put in the space. If anyone could fill this questionnaire out, I would really appreciate it and would help me a lot!

    1. What sort of lighting would be best suited for autistic children in a school environment?

    2. Do you think a soft play area is effective when trying to teach?

    3. Would having tinted windows help autistic children concentrate better?

    4. What sort of routines do you think works best at school?

    5. What sort of things help autistic children relax?

    6. Do you think having an interactive tablet to help autistic children learn is a good idea or would screen time affect their concentration?

    7. Would having a colour scheme for different lessons help them build a better routine at school?

    Thank you for spending time to fill this questionnaire out.
     
  2. Mary Terry

    Mary Terry Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I think your design should include a place of silence for the children - a space where noises are significantly muted or completely shut out.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
  3. rainfall

    rainfall Playing in the rain =P

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    I think that every question has multiple answers. Every child with autism is different with their own unique challenges. I'm no expert. I home school my son but we did try traditional school for pre school and I've been around other children with autism. These are just my thoughts on your questions.

    1. For my son, regular lighting because he's afraid of the dark. The brighter everything is the better, but that won't be best for every child that may have sensitivities to light.

    2. My son would be distracted with this area and not pay any attention to the teacher. For some it calms them and helps to focus.

    3. Tinted so they can't see out? If so, I think this partially a good idea. Most children are easily distracted by whatever is going on outside. However, not being able to see what's outside could cause anxiety for some children.

    4. I don't think it's a particular routine as opposed to sticking to one that has been made so they know what to expect and when as much as possible.

    5. Completely depends on the child and can even depend on what's causing the issue. My son uses a chew to calm down most effectively but will not always take it. Other children it's something in their hands, on their shoulders, white noise, deep pressure, etc.

    6. If it was for a certain amount of time each day or throughout the week then yes. Too much screen time irritates my son without him even realizing it and he can get angry and aggressive. A learning tablet is the very thing that taught him his letters, numbers, shapes, etc. After trying myself in the conventional ways I finally got him one years ago and at his own pace and repetition, he learned this within a month of using it at just over three years old.

    7. It's possible. As long as the colors don't change, because they could meltdown over not having what's expected. My son will notice even a fading or slight variation of color difference. I've worked with my son to be more accepting of change but in a school environment without having the children in their most comfortable and trusting environment, I wouldn't recommend attempting too much change after a routine has been established.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1