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Struggling with School

Discussion in 'Help and Support' started by BoltzmannBrain17, May 15, 2021.

  1. BoltzmannBrain17

    BoltzmannBrain17 Member

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    I've been struggling a lot with school lately. I just can't bring myself to focus in class or do schoolwork. I'm always either talking to a friend, ditching class, or dicking around on my phone. This used to work out because tests were weighted heavily at my school and I'd pass by getting A's or high B's on tests but now that assignments are half of my grade in most classes I've been getting straight F's. I just can't stand doing schoolwork. My parents are very disappointed in me and thoroughly upset. I'm going to have to do summer school and I'm pretty uncertain about what to do going forward. I don't know if I should go to college assuming I'm even able to or if I should get a GED and enter the workforce or if I should do something else entirely. I'm finishing up my Junior year and feel trapped. Any advice?
     
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  2. Finder

    Finder Active Member

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    School was always hard for me. But every level I went up, the better I did. I got some really lucky breaks that allowed me to take advantage of increasing levels of education. I can understand the stress that comes from working in that environment.

    However (you had to know there was going to be a "but" in there), this is about options and implications that will determine those options for the rest of your life. How far you go on the educational ladder will determine a great many things. Falling off the wrong place will not only limit what you can do, but also how much you will earn.

    Naturally, you can work for yourself. But that takes captial or a family business.

    Look at summer school as an opportunity. Learn to play the education game. Learn to ask for help. Right now, a year sounds like a long time. It is not in comparison to the rest of you life. None of this is fun, but neither is being stuck in a situation because your opportunities are limited by your educational attainment.

    Yes, there are people who build a life in non-traditional way, bucking the system (but they also come from wealthy backgrounds). There are far more that simply fail and fall through the cracks. Stopping at a GED is going to make things harder for you in the long term.
     
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  3. BoltzmannBrain17

    BoltzmannBrain17 Member

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    It's probably better that I learn how to work now as opposed to later so I definitely think you're right in regards to learning to play the "education game". But I'm not sure what I'd pursue in higher education. Math is tolerable compared to other subjects but I couldn't see myself really doing a math related job. Journalism sounds neat but I hate writing. It just seems like their is no light at the end of the education tunnel and the only difference between it and the others is that its longer.
     
  4. Yeshuasdaughter

    Yeshuasdaughter Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    You need to fix this NOW. Talk to your parents about signing up for your GED or going to a continuation school or Job Corps type program, where they can help you with that. YOU NEED your diploma or GED if you don't want to be on food stamps for the rest of your life. I mean that.
     
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  5. Misery

    Misery Photo-Negative V.I.P Member

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    There is one thing I'd like to say here, when it comes to the different subjects.

    What those subjects... math or history or whatever... are in school, whatever the experience of "learning" them is, isnt necessarily the experience they ACTUALLY are.

    I remember being in school, oh yes. And I remember how the teachers could not only make anything uninteresting, but could also make any subject seem actively repulsive.

    Math was the big one. It just seemed like this godawful stupid thing, boring beyond compare. Not only did they make it uninteresting, but they made me *hate* it.

    Cut forward quite a bunch of years, and due to Reasons, I decide to give it another shot. But this time, using entirely different learning methods from what those guys used to shove at me.

    And you know what? 5 or so days of some video watching and problem solving has done more than 12 bloody years of school could. Suddenly it wasnt tedious anymore. Couldnt bloody believe it, but I was actually enjoying myself. AND, it was... so much easier.

    As I often say, the school system is an utter disaster. They care more about following some "tradition" rather than REALLY learning how to teach. Rather than learning anything new themselves, about how kids in particular learn anything at all. It's no wonder why so many come away with a hate like mine.

    In other words, what I'm saying is: Try to keep an open mind about any subject. Writing for instance... maybe it sucks not because it actually sucks, but because of the way you've been exposed to the concept. You may later on find that hey, you actually quite like it... once you can do it without their stupid shackles, and explore it YOURSELF, learning in your own way.

    Well, that and also learning in a way that doesnt involve a brain-melting series of 40-minute long, ultra-dull lectures. I mean, really, what the heck are they thinking, to ever believe that such a method would be effective? Bloody fools, all of them.

    If you're struggling with a subject, maybe try exploring it yourself. Go look things up on Youtube or similar sites, and watch as some very skilled individuals actually manage to make said subject interesting. Once you find out that maybe X thing actually CAN be interesting, maybe the homework wont seems so bad. And wont take so long to do.

    That's my advice for this. It took me some 20 blasted years to realize all of this stuff, but maybe for you it doesnt have to take even close to that long.

    I hope I'm making sense here. I'm not very good at being concise so I usually just ramble a lot.
     
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  6. Streetwise

    Streetwise Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    there are very highly educated people with no job at all ,because more than one person applies for the job.

    I know someone with a law degree and was a solicitor and is now a Secretary.


    job training is good to experience the real !world not a lecture or a tutorial ,
     
  7. Yeshuasdaughter

    Yeshuasdaughter Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Many of those people got worthless degrees. Like Gender Studies or Fashion Design.

    Go for something where there is a real demand for the job. A "Job that exists". Nursing, Education, Construction, Engineering, etc.
     
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  8. Streetwise

    Streetwise Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    why did you need to slight my !view !,unless you know! every !single! person !with qualifications !,you are being purposely disrespectful .
     
  9. Finder

    Finder Active Member

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    I have been there. I hated writing with a passion. I thought the worst job in world, blending my dislike of education and English, would be an English teacher. Later, I taught English in Japan for ten years. My job after that was as a technical writer for a camera company. I have been an editor and an analyst, both requiring writing.

    As far as finding a major, there are lot of options. I got into my major almost by accident. After being rejected by every college I applied to, one only rejected me for my first choice. I wrote back about my second and the accepted me. I have a bachelor of science in imaging and photographic technology, which is an applied science degree.

    I also fell into my masters program by accident after being rejected by my selected major from five colleges. I selected something very different. I graduated with a 4.0 and I am now in a field that is really interesting. I needed the grad program to solve of income. BTW, at HS I was a C student and college a B- student, so things got better the higher I got on that ladder as I was able to focus on things that interested me.

    Culturally, we have this weird idea that we know what we what to do and are driven by passion. That makes good movies, but it is not normal. I really believe in serendipity. Most of the best things I have done in my life has been by accident. That is not to say I am just letting these things happen, but rather I put myself out there and doors appear. That skill of looking for possibilities has been really valuable. I have done things in my life that have been beyond my imagination. Not everything was a good choice, but it is a process, there is no destination.

    And yes, I have done things that really suck. And when in those situations, it is really tough to stay motivated. Everything looks bleak to the point I just want to give up. That is not a great long-term solution. But those degrees made the difference in that they gave possibilities that would have simply been closed to me. Just look at job descriptions. It is a tough market. Jobs that are not demanding require a bachelors just to get an entry-level position. It is insanity.

    I guess I see my life as a work in progress. It is full of compromises. In many times, a move is made to get closer to something else. I have certainly made bad moves. But I look at it as a question of finding opportunities.
     
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  10. Finder

    Finder Active Member

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    Funny, I know people with gender studies degrees working as government analysts and the fashion industry is huge. Some of the largest companies in the world are fashion companies, for example Nike. My first degree was in a huge industry that does not really exist anymore. I learnt the technical side of photographic film. Kodak was one of the largest companies in the world. The value of the degree is not just the face value of the major.

    The "get a real job" trope is just a trope. Sure, engineering is a great degree. But we need more than just engineers. And the demand argument tend to be a bit dishonest because the supply part of the equation is never expressed. The demand for color scientists is really low, but the supply is even lower.
     
  11. Yeshuasdaughter

    Yeshuasdaughter Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I'll have to respectfully disagree. I live in Portland Oregon, home of throngs of people who have useless degrees, who go on to blame their lack of job prospects on capitalism, instead of looking in the mirror and realizing they spent a quarter of a million dollars on a degree they'll never use.

    Meanwhile, the people who went into nursing or carpentry had job offers at graduation and are now making good money and feeding their families.

    Anthropological Underwater Basketry 101, anyone?
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2021
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  12. Yeshuasdaughter

    Yeshuasdaughter Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I am so sorry! I didn't mean to sound disrespectful. I saw a point that I wanted to add off of. I didn't mean anything against you. You know I think you are an awesome person @Streetwise , and I get so excited when you play the forum games, you always have the most wonderful posts.
     
  13. Ronald Zeeman

    Ronald Zeeman Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    You sound like me 48 years ago, past using the final exam, my final average mark in final year of high school was 61. Guidance councilor wrote letter, marks did not reflect whom I really was, got accepted by all colleges and universities I applied too. The world does not work the way every body tells you. Us aspies are different, the guidance councilor at my high-school realized some of us in my family were different and needed help to be accepted in college or university. It's society's loss if people like us are over looked, and drop out of school. Aspies actually move society forward because we look at the world differently. I recently read a book by "Lee Smolen" The Trouble with Physics; chapter 18; he talks about people like us. He states that all the biggest break throughs are made by us over looking people like us is a loss to society. AND yes you can make a difference; check the back story of some of the worlds best scientists, I mean the ones that make the great break throughs you will be surprised high school drop outs ... etc.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2021
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  14. Finder

    Finder Active Member

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    And I know nurses and carpenters who can't make ends meet, so I am unsure of your point. The data clearly point to having a four-year degree correlates to higher life-time earnings. I did that research while working for a liberal arts college--go figure. The basket weaving trope is also just a trope. Job rates from this liberal arts institution were high and in well-paying jobs.

    Naturally, the decline in middle-class wages are outside this topic as well as the critique of neo-liberal economics.
     
  15. Yeshuasdaughter

    Yeshuasdaughter Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    @Finder , I apologize. We're obviously not understanding one another. I believe trade school is the way to go! A university degree can be useless, unless you major in something that has an endgame strategy, a career field that is in high demand. I believe that trade schools and apprenticeships are the key to strengthening our communities and our nation.

    Sadly, many universities have become little more than socialist indoctrination centers that inject every curricula of every department with dangerous political propaganda, even mathematics and the sciences. Rather than the classical education approach of teaching you how to think for yourself, many colleges and universities now tell you WHAT to think.

    But beyond this argument, let's get back to the fundamental argument of this thread. This kid MUST graduate high school. He needs to seek out help now, as he is finishing 11th grade. Either a GED, Continuation School, or ideally, like I said before, Job Corps. They'll train him for a job and help him get a high school diploma or GED- at his own pace!

    Please @BoltzmannBrain17 , consider Job Corps. You get free food, free dorm, free education, a driver's license, a clothing allowance, a free uniform for your trade, and amazing on the job, and in classroom job training. Plus you get paid and you can go into town and hang out with new friends.

    You come out of the program with a diploma or GED and full certification in a trade of your choice. If you are a good student and graduate your program, they also pay for you go to go to advanced training or community college for free, and still live on campus. It's the best program on earth!

    I graduated from Job Corps!

    https://www.jobcorps.gov/
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2021
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  16. ForestGumpett

    ForestGumpett Active Member

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    I had to drop out early to help support our family and go to work full time by 15 so went to night school and got a HS diploma, sometimes that can get you a little bit ahead of a GED, but get one or the other!

    I graduated a year early and then went on at night while working to take classes in a community college. It was great, I also found that community colleges seem to have more options to help with learning differences.

    I got degrees in EKG/CNA/Polysomnography/and Boatbuilding!

    I do not know of one university that you could get all that in, plus do it while still working!

    Wish you the best, lots of options


    **Edited to add: If I were younger, and/or could do it all over again I’d join the military and have them pay for my education plus your retirement would be lots better! No extra time on your hands, you’d be busy and stay in remarkable shape!
     
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  17. Yeshuasdaughter

    Yeshuasdaughter Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Yes! Join the Navy! That's a great idea!
     
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  18. SimonSays

    SimonSays Becoming aware of what appears to be real V.I.P Member

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    Assuming you make it without having your legs blown off by an IED, or coming home in a box. :rolleyes:
    Isn't the point of being in the military being willing to die for your country?

    That JobCorp idea looks an amazing opportunity. To learn a trade while being supported that way. If I was 38 years younger and an American, I'd do it. We don't have anything like that here. :(
     
  19. BoltzmannBrain17

    BoltzmannBrain17 Member

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    The Jobcorps sound neat but I'm not really interested in learning a trade. I've never really been a hands on technically skilled person. After having thought a bit over the past few days I think college is probably my best option. Math is somewhat interesting and I'm pretty sure I at least got Calculus 1 college credit from the AP Calculus BC test and maybe also Calculus 2 college credit so maybe majoring in math could be a good option. I just need to get my grades up so I can graduate and go to college. Ones thing for sure though. I am really going to need to bust my *ss in summer school.
     
  20. Ronald Zeeman

    Ronald Zeeman Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Sounds like you want to take the same path I took, I have two college diplomas, Chemical Engineering Technology, and second Coatings Technician Coating's, with a Management Certificate in Quality Engineering, also an Honour Secondary School Diploma grade (13). I built a very sucess ful career on this.