1. Welcome to Autism Forums, a friendly forum to discuss Aspergers Syndrome, Autism, High Functioning Autism and related conditions.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Private Member only forums for more serious discussions that you may wish to not have guests or search engines access to.
    • Your very own blog. Write about anything you like on your own individual blog.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon! Please also check us out @ https://www.twitter.com/aspiescentral

Featured Strange and uncomfortable thoughts

Discussion in 'PDD-NOS, Social Anxiety and Others' started by Dadamen, Jan 17, 2021.

  1. Dadamen

    Dadamen Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    308
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2020
    Karma:
    +216
    It happens for me already for years, but is getting more often last few months, here are the examples.
    1) It comes to my mind to say something to someone, althrough I know it's going to hurt them, but I have an intensive fear I will say it and hurt that person and feel like I'm fighting with myself strongly.
    2) Yesterday I saw my father's bike in garage that he likes a lot. I had an intensive fear I'll break it, either intentionally or accidently and I didn't feel safe to even pass next to it.
    3) It came on my mind to eat things that are not food and I also had a fear that I'll do it and that I have to control myself strongly not to do it.
    4) i'm afraid that I'll injure or kill people that I love.
    5) I rememberd some near accidents from my life and imagined what would happen if there was an accident.
    What could this be? Did anyone have it? How do you cope with it?
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 4
    • Agree Agree x 1
  2. tree

    tree Blue/Green Staff Member V.I.P Member

    Messages:
    35,975
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2013
    Karma:
    +26,197
    Common obsessions
    The three most common themes are:
    • unwanted thoughts about harm or aggression
    • unwanted sexual thoughts
    • unwanted blasphemous thoughts
    Some examples of obsessions include:
    • a fear of failing to prevent harm – e.g. worrying that you have left
    the cooker on and might cause a fire
    • imagining doing harm – e.g. thinking that you are going to push
    someone in front of a train
    • intrusive sexual thoughts – e.g. worrying about abusing a child
    • religious or blasphemous thoughts – e.g. having thoughts that are
    against your religious beliefs
    • fear of contamination – e.g. from dirt and germs in a toilet
    • an excessive concern with order or symmetry – e.g. worrying if objects
    are not in order
    • illness or physical symptoms – e.g. thinking that you have cancer
    when you have no symptoms.

    What Are Common Obsessions and Compulsions? | Everyday Health
     
    • Informative Informative x 7
    • Useful Useful x 2
  3. Dadamen

    Dadamen Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    308
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2020
    Karma:
    +216
    Have that sometimes.
    Also that
    Also that and also fear of sick people.
    Yes becuase I had cancer and am afraid of relapse.

    So, I likely have some degree of OCD.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
  4. AprilR

    AprilR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    384
    Joined:
    May 11, 2020
    Karma:
    +624
    It also sounds like ocd to me. You can have ocd without compulsions also, it's called "pure o- ocd" I am diagnosed with it.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  5. Dadamen

    Dadamen Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    308
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2020
    Karma:
    +216
    I also heard that Greta Thunberg has OCD along with Asperger's.
    There are days I don't have these obsessive thoughts and days when I get a couple in a day. Can this be ocd or I should have them all the time to get ocd diagnosis?
     
  6. AprilR

    AprilR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    384
    Joined:
    May 11, 2020
    Karma:
    +624
    You can have them from time to time, doesn't have to be all the time my psych told me. They're called intrusive thoughts.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  7. Wolfsage

    Wolfsage In training to be Wolf King.

    Messages:
    507
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2020
    Karma:
    +806
    Yep. I get them too. Sickness doesn't help it.

    Mine got bad. I was sick. For an entire month with thoughts like those you described swirling threw my head.
    Eventually it became life or death.
    Either I was going to survive those thoughts and sickness. Or give up and succumb. I fought and pushed back.
    My mind was damaged and eventually I had to seek help. Six months after the virus left my body.
    But, I can tell you this. Those thoughts can do nothing without your permission. You still have control.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  8. Soleil

    Soleil Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    305
    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2020
    Karma:
    +380
    I get these kinds of thoughts a lot. My therapist said that as long as I'm not compelled to act on them, and as long as I don't like them, then it's not really a significant problem. Unless you're having these a lot, I guess.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  9. Wolfgangus Faldestolius

    Wolfgangus Faldestolius Little notes from an armchair

    Messages:
    421
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2020
    Karma:
    +508
    You need to have a scale of hypotheses and put a score against issues like these, nearly always it will surely be "might not" or "probably won't".

    if you have a routine of weighing up speech at the last moment before going ahead with speaking, then if you decide not to say it you can do something different like smile to yourself instead (unobtrusively)

    If you're aware of your elbows and feet, and distances, you can tell whether you are about to bash something frail. (Faintly tinted lenses in a customised tint, obtained through an optician, worn a few hours per month, help my distance vision; but I also use quick inference to work out distances at a glance.)

    I was occasionally slightly like this, a long time ago.

    I awakened the inner scientist in me and figured out which were probable problems and which weren't, really. Then I gradually pieced together a simple, workable method.

    Another thing that helped was, I developed a steady gait, rolling my feet (if I remember). There's no harm in thinking out our moves a little bit. I have read up about motor praxis and find it fascinating and this enables me to put the way my body "ticks" to useful use.

    I've always enjoyed multi-track thinking of course so self-consciousness doesn't get obtrusive for me.
     
    • Useful Useful x 1
  10. Wolfgangus Faldestolius

    Wolfgangus Faldestolius Little notes from an armchair

    Messages:
    421
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2020
    Karma:
    +508
    A suggestion: reframe this - it is NOT an obsession (if the things aren't someone else's), and is scarcely likely to be excessive.

    When I was a kiddy and arranged my model cars in rainbow colour order it was not pathology but WIT.

    I find that if I place my things parallel to the edge of my furniture or at 45 degrees to it, I can comprehend them better because my environment is harmonious to my senses (because a jumble puzzles, which is too much work). Therefore I have a practical benefit from arranging things how I like.

    This is important because I have "way-stations" towards "proper" organisation - the chunking-down method - which is my way of coping with short attention span and piggy backing on my favoured multi-tasking method.

    Thus, if I can't tidy stuff away all at once, as an alternative to worrying, I leave things in such a way that I can instantly understand where I left off when I come back to them.

    I sometimes permit myself to do slightly more of this than I could get away with, as a game, but only if I've the time. If it's a stepping stone to organising it's still useful.

    Make your "problems" work for you and not against you!

    Shelves (without doors) are nice: go up the walls to save going up the wall!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Wolfgangus Faldestolius

    Wolfgangus Faldestolius Little notes from an armchair

    Messages:
    421
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2020
    Karma:
    +508
    tree said:
    imagining doing harm – e.g. thinking that you are going to push
    someone in front of a train
    Also that

    If you put your hands in your pockets or clasp them, and stand 7 ft away, then you will get used to knowing what you are not going to do. (Lo and behold - everyone else is using that very same method!)

    In any demanding environment I think mostly of what about it I like, e.g station platforms remind me of geography, and time past and future. Or maybe the favourite thing I read that day.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
    • Like Like x 1
  12. SusanLR

    SusanLR Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

    Messages:
    3,640
    Joined:
    May 22, 2017
    Karma:
    +6,664
    I had obsessive - intrusive thoughts very badly around age 13 -14.
    Gross thoughts that I just kept thinking more and more until I had my first panic attack from them.
    I was afraid to tell anyone because I thought I must be metally ill and no telling what my parents
    or a doctor would do.

    It was like scratching an itch and the more you scratch, the more you are compelled to keep doing it
    even though it doesn't feel good and you make a sore from it, you just keep doing it.
    The fear of harming someone I cared for because I wouldn't be able to control myself even though
    I had no urge to do so was the worst.
    What a way to scare yourself.

    I didn't talk with a psych about it until I was 19 and by then they had almost totally stopped.
    She said it was it was OCD and anxiety. Gave me Tranxene, mild tranquilizer, for a while
    and said don't let the thoughts scare me or make me think I would suddenly go crazy and
    act on them. It doesn't work that way.

    I still have OCD, but, not those gross intrusive thoughts.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  13. SDRSpark

    SDRSpark Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

    Messages:
    882
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2019
    Karma:
    +1,580
    Huh...I used to really struggle with this as a child (I would get physically ill from struggling with the thoughts) and I still do on occasion...though now it's pretty rare.

    I have an OCD diagnosis but never really thought it fit. Maybe it does.
     
  14. Dadamen

    Dadamen Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    308
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2020
    Karma:
    +216
    How did you get physically ill?
     
  15. SDRSpark

    SDRSpark Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

    Messages:
    882
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2019
    Karma:
    +1,580
    Diarrhea, vomiting (or just wanting too), that "sick" feeling in my chest.
     
  16. ZebraAspie

    ZebraAspie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    979
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2017
    Karma:
    +955
    I have sort of experienced similar. I have severe anxiety. I take fluoxetine which helps but doesn’t cure. I’ve spoke to Councillors and neuropsychologist about it which also helped,
     
  17. inkfingers

    inkfingers 21 year old artist

    Messages:
    267
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2018
    Karma:
    +575
    It sounds like you have Pure OCD, where you suffer from disturbing intrusive thoughts. I’d advise seeing a psychologist/ psychiatrist and finding ways to deal with your fear/anxiety, whether that be through therapy or medication. I wish you the best of luck.
     
  18. WolfSpirit

    WolfSpirit Not a dictionary. Or a search engine

    Messages:
    413
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2021
    Karma:
    +511
    Don't know if this will help or not, but it popped into my email one day as part of my daily email newsletters from Everyday Health.com, just when I needed it the most. As a general rule, I find the articles Therese Bouchard writes to be quite useful, even though most days they're not particularly relevant to my current life now that so much has improved. (she's the one who operates Project Beyond Blue, about dealing with treatment resistant depression.). I've only ever seen what pops into my email from Everyday Health, but, still she's on my radar as a good information source about depression.

    5 Ways to Free Yourself From Dark and Obsessive Thoughts
     
  19. Qoyote

    Qoyote Active Member

    Messages:
    5
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2019
    Karma:
    +10
    Oh my God, it feels so good to know other people understand this. I have this exact problem and I can't talk about it with anyone. Thank you guys.