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Somebody in my family is against me buying a bicycle

Metalhead

Video game and movie addict.
V.I.P Member
That somebody is (not surprisingly) my mother, and her reason for not wanting me to have a bicycle was because she almost saw me get hit by a car when I was riding my bike when I was eight and she never really forgave me over it. She is convinced that if I buy a bike, I will die on that bike.

I want some of the drugs she is taking.
 

Shaddock

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
you´re already a big boy, I think you can decide on your own. :p

a motorcycle would be a bit different, because it really can be dangerous, but a bike? lol.

why is it important what she thinks? ok she has fears and it´s nice when you care of that, but you can not limit your own life because of irrational fears of hers.

caring of her is good, but not buying a bike and driving it, because of her is not acceptable and not appropiate. I would speak with her about her fears and try to explain her that there is no risk and even when she not agrees, still buying the bike.
 

Metalhead

Video game and movie addict.
V.I.P Member
you´re already a big boy, I think you can decide on your own. :p

a motorcycle would be a bit different, because it really can be dangerous, but a bike? lol.

why is it important what she thinks? ok she has fears and it´s nice when you care of that, but you can not limit your own life because of irrational fears of hers.

caring of her is good, but not buying a bike and driving it, because of her is not acceptable and not appropiate. I would speak with her about her fears and try to explain her that there is no risk and even when she not agrees, still buying the bike.
Yeah, I know, I guess the main reason why this concerns me was because of the time she tried to have me involuntary committed to a psych ward just because I was not doing what she wanted me to do, and I wad 25 and had been living alone for years when she tried that stunt.
 

Shaddock

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Yeah, I know, I guess the main reason why this concerns me was because of the time she tried to have me involuntary committed to a psych ward just because I was not doing what she wanted me to do, and I wad 25 and had been living alone for years when she tried that stunt.
sounds like a control freak. maybe better keep more distance to her. I don´t have to say that her behavior was wrong. just don´t give her might over your life. the more she tries to invade your life/to get control over it, the more you have to lock her out of it. be assertive and inexorable.
 

Gerald Wilgus

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
The more visible you make yourself the safer you will be. I use a rear strobe that catches people's attention along with a flag because I am so low. A helmet is a must. Twice I have seen them protect people from serious injury. A rearview mirror comes in handy too.
 

Neonatal RRT

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Some of those e-bikes are not only fun to ride, but can be quite practical,...going up hills, less likely to hold up traffic, you don't arrive to your destination all sweaty on those warm days.
 

Forest Cat

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I thought it sounded weird, until I saw the word "mother". I think we have to face it, in our mothers eyes we will never be older than 10. :) Never.
 
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Atrapa Almas

70% INTJ + 30% ASPIE = 100% HUMAN
V.I.P Member
In case of a fall, let the bike go one way and you go the opposite one. Never fall with the bike.

Its a great way to move arround and a great exercice too.
 

Gerontius

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I was bombing around Connecticut on a Raleigh designed before World War I. Get the (two) wheels you prefer and go from there.

If I had that much practical service out of 50 pounds of rusted metal without even coaster brakes, I think you are going to have fine results when you get any decent bicycle.

IMG_20210108_053001.jpg
 

Silhouette Mirage

[None]
V.I.P Member
That somebody is (not surprisingly) my mother, and her reason for not wanting me to have a bicycle was because she almost saw me get hit by a car when I was riding my bike when I was eight and she never really forgave me over it. She is convinced that if I buy a bike, I will die on that bike.

I want some of the drugs she is taking.

Sounds like she might be traumatized from the experience, which is understandable. You've got to do what's best for you, of course, and for you the rewards probably outweigh the risks any day of the week. I personally deal with all sorts of anxiety, and it kind of gives you the sense that the risks are never worth taking. It's like a disease.

If I had kids, they'd never leave the house, never get into cars, and never have normal lives because I'm so crazy and overprotective. Good thing I'll never have any!
 

risk

Member
I ride daily and frankly its as dangerous as you make it. If you happen to have a valid an unconditional drivers license. Then you clear are not otherwise in capable, personally I would advise all of the following.
1. Where possible ride away from traffic, footpaths, side streets and other area where permissible.
2. Make usage of a mirror of some form to detect traffic from behind.
3. Always give cars the right of way unless they signal otherwise.
4. Always carry a mobile phone or any other equipment.
5. Never down hill at high velocity any road surface you have not carefully studied before hand. And only do so on a bike properly rated for said velocity.
6. Drink water and lots of it you will breath heavily even on short rides.
7. Carry a lock for said bike and use a suitable helmet. Both can double as weapons if required and the former allows you to secure the bike should it physically fail.
8. Stay away from cars and trucks and leave them be and generally don't ride around cliffs and high places.

I am some 1000+ rides in and yet to be seriously injured with the exception of hitting a dog that crossed my path at low velocity. But in balance I think riding a bike would be a serious net benefit to ones health considering. its a really good way to consume vast amounts of energy and get the blood pumping. Feel free to forward my thinking to the folks if it helps.
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Yeah, I know, I guess the main reason why this concerns me was because of the time she tried to have me involuntary committed to a psych ward just because I was not doing what she wanted me to do, and I wad 25 and had been living alone for years when she tried that stunt.

In the big picture you might set aside money to purchase a bicycle, and instead seek the counsel of an attorney who specializes in such concerns. Especially if power or attorney is not an issue.

Not that you want to have to threaten your own mother with litigation, but it may pay to know exactly where you truly stand on such matters, so this "cloud" will no longer be over your head.

I know over the years such laws in California have gotten tighter when it comes to involuntary commitment. It wouldn't surprise me if the state of Washington followed suit as well. Something I had to deal with as both a trustee of my mother's living trust, and also having power of attorney while she was alive. Reminded me of some legal technicalities which reinforced how little power I actually had over my mother's affairs. Which wasn't an issue, but it did make me wonder what the point of power of attorney actually amounted to.

Unless your mother does have POA over your affairs, it's just plain sad that she can influence a middle-aged man to such a degree. Not to mention that attempting to indiscriminately leverage anyone with involuntary commitment could potentially be both a civil and a criminal offense.
 
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Gerald Wilgus

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I ride daily and frankly its as dangerous as you make it. If you happen to have a valid an unconditional drivers license. Then you clear are not otherwise in capable, personally I would advise all of the following.
1. Where possible ride away from traffic, footpaths, side streets and other area where permissible.
2. Make usage of a mirror of some form to detect traffic from behind.
3. Always give cars the right of way unless they signal otherwise.
4. Always carry a mobile phone or any other equipment.
5. Never down hill at high velocity any road surface you have not carefully studied before hand. And only do so on a bike properly rated for said velocity.
6. Drink water and lots of it you will breath heavily even on short rides.
7. Carry a lock for said bike and use a suitable helmet. Both can double as weapons if required and the former allows you to secure the bike should it physically fail.
8. Stay away from cars and trucks and leave them be and generally don't ride around cliffs and high places.

I am some 1000+ rides in and yet to be seriously injured with the exception of hitting a dog that crossed my path at low velocity. But in balance I think riding a bike would be a serious net benefit to ones health considering. its a really good way to consume vast amounts of energy and get the blood pumping. Feel free to forward my thinking to the folks if it helps.
Don't forget that it pays to make yourself visible. I also avoided riding with a low sun at my back on secondary streets that feed subdivisions. I have seen too many drivers make turns without seeing oncoming trafic when sun blind.
 

maycontainthunder

May also contain missing cakes.
V.I.P Member
I used to cycle to work. A form of mountain bike is best because the tires cushion the rough road to a point. My commuting bike was a total bitsa built around a frame bought for £5. Wheels from one bike, forks from another and other bits and pieces I had scattered in my shed. Clocked about 3000 miles on that.

From a comfort point of view; get one with suspension forks as a minimum. Riding a full rigid bike on rough roads gives your wrists something to complain about.

Look at gel saddles, they are better and more comfortable for longer rides. A speedometer is handy as is a camera.

It is also worth looking at getting a tool kit so you can do all the maintenance yourself.

I don't know if the cheap disk brakes are still cable operated but I preferred a good set of v-brakes, they had more stopping power back then. Disks have the advantage in muddy conditions.
 

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