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Featured Some thoughts on various Autism quizzes.

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by Daydreamer, Oct 12, 2018.

  1. Daydreamer

    Daydreamer Scatterbrained Creative

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    I know that they are just random tests on the internet, and shouldn't be taken too seriously on their own, however I do have some thoughts on the matter that I'd like to share.

    First off all, some of the questions I've seen on a few of them are downright bizarre, for example "Are you attracted to unusual aspects of the opposite sex?" Unusual? How so? What does this even mean? Also, I presume we're not just talking platonically here, and if that's the case then since I'm gay should I answer such a question as if it is asking me about the same sex?

    Also, "Do you have a difficult time telling if people are flirting with you?" is also a difficult question for me to answer since the type of individuals that choose to flirt with me are far from subtle about it. Usually such conversations go along the lines of "Hey you have a pretty face, I like you, date me?". I have something of reputation of missing subtly and sometimes sarcasm, so typically those who choose to flirt with me are fairly straight to the point about it. So, in practice no, but if someone were to take a more subtle approach...then maybe.

    Usually I score either borderline, both Aspie and NT traits (although sometimes I get predominately NT), or more autism traits than most but below diagnostic threshold. These quizzes typically place me in the grey area between both categories, albeit leaning more towards NT.

    It's a shame that the RAADS-R test doesn't have more detailed options such as "I used to do this a lot in childhood, but even though I partake in this activity I do it significantly less than I did in the past". Picking "I did this then and I do it now" makes it seem as though I do the activity to the same level as I did previously. Typically I score high on this test, usually in the 110-137 range.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018
  2. Nervous Rex

    Nervous Rex High-functioning autistic V.I.P Member

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    Seriously.

    If you're attracted to "unusual aspects" then how do you know they're unusual?

    If you don't recognize flirting, then how do you know you're not seeing it. You just think no one flirts with you.

    The quizzes that ask, "Do others often tell you .." at least put some effort into understanding perspective.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2018
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  3. Horsegirl

    Horsegirl Well-Known Member

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    I hate these quizzes!
    They drive me nuts. I can remember once I took one and one of the questions was, "Do you care about other people?"
    OH MY LORD.
    Of course I care about other people! Even if you are an aspies you still care about loved ones!
     
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  4. Progster

    Progster Gone sideways to the sun V.I.P Member

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    I think that these tests were originally designed to be administered by a clinician, who presumably would explain the questions.

    They are flawed. It's possible that a person with strong ASD traits might actually score lower on the AQ tests, because it assumes an awareness of there being a problem, and some people just aren't aware of a problem or how they come across to others. I was unaware of many of my traits until someone got frustrated with me and started shouting at me that I have no social skills or that I'm so rigid or stubborn or something like that, or "Can't you see that I'm feeling upset?"

    Also, the "do people tell you..." kind of questions. No, they don't tell me. People don't tell me what they are thinking, I am oblivious until someone gets frustrated with me (see above). Also, it's not like I talk to loads of people or have an active social life or wide social circle, so I simply don't talk to many people on a daily basis who could make such comments to me.
     
  5. BraidedPony

    BraidedPony Enjoying life and glad to be alive! V.I.P Member

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    Some of the questions seem geared towards younger people too like flirting situations. There were a lot of questions about social situations that I haven’t had in decades since I stay home. So, all the ones about feedback from friends and family....I had to either remember back 30 years or just guess.
    Is my voice too loud or monotone? I don’t really speak at all so....? My dog says I’m perfect, so all is well.
     
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  6. AuBurney Tuckerson

    AuBurney Tuckerson ~GigglesTheAutisticHyena~

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    Hey, same here! I heard about autism from my mother and decided to look it up. She thinks I have autism from what I did in my childhood, and after taking multiple online tests, looking up signs, and noticing that they applied to me, I decided to go get officially diagnosed, and now I'm waiting for my results.
     
  7. Daydreamer

    Daydreamer Scatterbrained Creative

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    I took the Aspie Quiz recently, here are my results:

    [​IMG]

    Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 90 of 200
    Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 121 of 200
    You seem to have both neurodiverse and neurotypical traits.

    Aspie Quiz
     
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  8. Autistamatic

    Autistamatic He's just this guy, you know? V.I.P Member

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    That's an interesting one for me - until recently I would have said no, but since I put myself on video I realised that I am naturally quite monotonous and my facial expression doesn't change much to express or emphasise my feelings.
    Volume seems acceptable, but In think I've got that "Ferris Bueller's teacher" quality to some degree.
    I've made a conscious effort to sound more expressive, particularly on video and it seems to be paying off so far.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2018
  9. AuBurney Tuckerson

    AuBurney Tuckerson ~GigglesTheAutisticHyena~

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    Same here! My mother said I sounded like a robot, and I hear myself after watching a video I made. I do sound like a robot or a stereotypical boring professor.. WHYYYYYYYYYYYY! XD
     
  10. Nervous Rex

    Nervous Rex High-functioning autistic V.I.P Member

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    Same here. A friend of mine likes to say, "That person has a face made for radio." I think I have a voice made for print.

    Also same here. Several years ago, I noticed that people often reacted to my comments as if I was angry. I started making a conscious effort to put more inflection and friendliness in my voice. The hostile reactions stopped, but even better, people talk about me behind my back as being a "nice guy."
     
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  11. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Interesting. That a purely monotone voice could be perceived with hostility.

    Is this a Neurotypical perception? I've never given this any thought. :confused:
     
  12. BraidedPony

    BraidedPony Enjoying life and glad to be alive! V.I.P Member

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    I remember being asked all the time if I was angry. I would say no but they would look at me like they didn’t believe me.
    If I was angry they would know it without a doubt! Lol
    So, were they responding to a serious look on my face because I was usually anxious, worried, deciding what to do with my hands, wanting to make a gracious exit? Or my tone of voice? Both?
     
  13. Nervous Rex

    Nervous Rex High-functioning autistic V.I.P Member

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    Me, too! This has happened to me several times:

    "Are you mad?"
    "No."
    "Are you sure?"
    "Yes, I'm sure."
    "Really, you're not mad?"
    "NO! I'm not mad! But keep asking and I will be."
     
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  14. Nervous Rex

    Nervous Rex High-functioning autistic V.I.P Member

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    I'm guessing it's a combination of a low, monotone voice, a serious looking face, and a lack of emotional cues that leaves them guessing, so they assume the worst.
     
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  15. DCA

    DCA Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I used to get a lot of "What's wrong?" type questions...
     
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  16. Autistamatic

    Autistamatic He's just this guy, you know? V.I.P Member

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    Even now my wife will sometimes ask me if something is wrong because she says I look p1$$ed off. She knows me better than anyone. Thankfully she believes me when I tell her there's nothing wrong. It's often when I'm really into something we're watching or I've something on my mind.
     
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  17. Daydreamer

    Daydreamer Scatterbrained Creative

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    Personally, I often act differently on camera VS off camera. The main differences are;

    Body language on camera

    - Little to no movement in arms (or alternatively, jittery hands and arms whilst the majority of the body stays still), shoulders are tucked in and kept slightly upwards.

    -On one of my videos, I quickly glance to the side when trying to look straight into the camera whilst filming a medium close up shot. It's a very short glance and then my focus returns to the camera, but that's what makes it stand out. Perhaps if I'd done it more casually it would've looked better, but since my eyes suddenly jolt back to the centre it comes across as quite odd and people have pointed this out to me.

    -Oddly formal, looks unnatural, and a bit awkward.

    - Very little in terms of hand gestures.

    My usual body language

    - Often expressive with my hands, especially when describing something. People tend to consider me to be a rather animated individual.

    - More relaxed.

    The reason this happens

    I tend to get rather anxious when someone points a camera at me, since I'm aware that I have a tendency to fidget a lot and if I'm trying to film anything professional then I'm conscious of how my body language appears on camera. Unfortunately, this can actually make it worse as I end up putting so much effort into not fidgeting that I forget to add more casual movements in there.

    The two main videos I had to film for University (where I had significant roles on screen) for previous projects I have done are quite awful. In the first video I ever made, one of my arms is fidgeting a lot. When I watched the footage I noticed that it was a similar action to one that I have mentioned in another thread: The Umbrella.

    I suddenly realised part way through filming the video, and stopped doing this. Unfortunately, my group didn't have time to edit the footage or redo any of the shots, so I had to submit what I had. My entire group (except one guy) looked uncomfortable on camera. I remember my tutor once remarked that it was quite common for students who preferred working with cameras to dislike being in the film themselves (Or alternatively, camera men/women usually aren't the type to want to act in the spotlight). Perhaps there is a hint of truth to that statement...I much prefer to direct and edit videos rather than star in them myself. Of course it varies depending on the individual, some like to do both and others dislike the idea of both activities.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2018
  18. Autistamatic

    Autistamatic He's just this guy, you know? V.I.P Member

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    Thanks for the insight @Daydreamer
    I did wonder about exactly that and after making the observations on my scripted videos, I set a couple of cameras up on a few evenings recently to record myself "acting normally".
    The results were interesting. As your post predicts I was less stilted and monotonous than in the videos, but unless I particularly made an effort to appear animated, my natural behaviour was still quite different to what I see in most NT people. My voice was still flat, but less monotone than with a script, but my face hardly moves. I seem to go through three expressions - neutral for most of the time, happy and one I'd call "negative" which seems to be sadness, agitation, anger and confusion all in one. I do naturally make hand gestures but only when I'm strongly emotionally stimulated.
    The version of me that you all see on the Autistamatic videos is not the natural me by any stretch of the imagination, but hopefully I'm doing well enough to engage an NT audience :)
     
  19. Daydreamer

    Daydreamer Scatterbrained Creative

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    To add another quiz onto that...

    RAADS-R: The Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R)

    Total score: 123.

    Language: 9

    Social relatedness: 48

    Sensory/Motor: 37

    Circumscribed Interests: 29
     
  20. AuBurney Tuckerson

    AuBurney Tuckerson ~GigglesTheAutisticHyena~

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    Here's my score! Screenshot_20181027-235009_Samsung Internet.jpg