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So Resident Evil [1] could be remade, again...

We live in a society that has no original ideas of thier own and would rather further milk what's well known, popular, or well regarded. Remakes, reboots, redos. All in the name of capital. Money.

This is no more a surprise, as finding out that water is wet. Or that fire is hot.
 
We live in a society that has no original ideas of thier own and would rather further milk what's well known, popular, or well regarded. Remakes, reboots, redos. All in the name of capital. Money.

This is no more a surprise, as finding out that water is wet. Or that fire is hot.

The sad part is, it isnt truly just about greed with stuff like this, when it comes to creativity: they (and many other big studios) have simply dug themselves into a hole.

At this point, AAA game development is expensive to the point of absolute insanity because of the "graphics first" approach, and other elements like the need to cast ultra-expensive voice actors to do 5 million lines. And high expense means high risk. If that billion-dollar project flops, well... yeah that's an enormous amount of money down the drain.

So basically it's far too risky to try something new and creative at that level. They went too far with the whole graphics thing, dug too deep, and now they cant get back out.

Oh they technically could tone things down, as NONE of that stuff is actually necessary to make a great game, but with that approach having gone on for so long, endlessly improving graphics are EXPECTED by consumers, and that means it's mandatory. And has been for a very long time now. A vicious cycle.

The whole thing has gotten so bad that now they're having to dive into remakes of remakes in order to avoid risk.

It aint all bad though, despite what certain outlets would have you believe. I've said it 5 million times: The creativity is out there... everywhere, in fact. But you have to actually look somewhere else and step outside of your comfort zone to find it. I mean good grief there are entire genres that are utterly missing from the AAA space, but are outright thriving elsewhere.

From my vantage point, gaming has never been better. But then, I dont touch AAA stuff with a 200 foot pole (usually. I made an exception with Diablo 4 because "well I keep complaining about these, but when was the last time I TRIED one?" Predictable results, really, but hey, I tried a thing). I still watch that side of the industry though, it can be really funny at times.
 
@Misery I don't like how seriously the game industry takes itself now.. I preferred when it was wonky and a bit absurd.
i work in game industry, and it's so, so hard to work in. it's just huge businesses now, where people, like in other businesses, are fighting one another to get to better positions, and to push some safe ideas, instead of trying something new, and all of it is just about money. only small indie companies are those who experiment still, triple A companies just do basic things which look fancy and cost huge amount of money, but aren't really anything new.
it's also funny being a part of this industry and seeing how people on top are swimming in money, and even if you work in a company which gets those money, salaries are funnily small for anyone who isn't some lead manager and stuff like that. i do not recommend getting into this industry anyone, who isn't ready to work with sharks and being pushed to the bottom, doing all the work, while company never sees you as a person, you're just a small cog. it's nice, of course, just to see how yes, this is the game i worked on, but it's just so stressful to get to that point, and because there is now so many games, you can spend 2 years on making an amazing unique game, which won't be seen by anyone, because you don't have money for marketing. and, because big companies want money, they'll brush off your unique ideas and just tell you "do like that company did, but change a bit, so it doesn't look like we stole it". :rolleyes:
 
@Misery I don't like how seriously the game industry takes itself now.. I preferred when it was wonky and a bit absurd.

Have a look at a few things:



Save 45% on Warsim: The Realm of Aslona on Steam (probably the strangest example)





And my personal favorite example of all time:


That last one is very special to me for reasons that would take awhile to explain (it's also the most wonky of all of them, and that's the entire point of it), but really all of these are examples of what you're saying.

I, too, love some wonky absurdness... it's one of the things that first got me into indie games (Isaac and Spelunky, specifically).

The stuff in that short list there is specifically non-roguelikes... get me started on THAT genre and I wont shut up. Really though any genre you can think of, I could find examples of.


i work in game industry, and it's so, so hard to work in. it's just huge businesses now, where people, like in other businesses, are fighting one another to get to better positions, and to push some safe ideas, instead of trying something new, and all of it is just about money. only small indie companies are those who experiment still, triple A companies just do basic things which look fancy and cost huge amount of money, but aren't really anything new.
it's also funny being a part of this industry and seeing how people on top are swimming in money, and even if you work in a company which gets those money, salaries are funnily small for anyone who isn't some lead manager and stuff like that. i do not recommend getting into this industry anyone, who isn't ready to work with sharks and being pushed to the bottom, doing all the work, while company never sees you as a person, you're just a small cog. it's nice, of course, just to see how yes, this is the game i worked on, but it's just so stressful to get to that point, and because there is now so many games, you can spend 2 years on making an amazing unique game, which won't be seen by anyone, because you don't have money for marketing. and, because big companies want money, they'll brush off your unique ideas and just tell you "do like that company did, but change a bit, so it doesn't look like we stole it". :rolleyes:


Yes, I'd agree with this. Originally, I wanted to get into the AAA side of the industry myself... I went to college for it. But that didnt work out due to disability, and I'm thankful for that. I know enough at this point to have a full understanding of just how difficult AAA development really is.

I've done some indie development myself (look up a game called Starward Rogue, which I was part of the team on, and also Last Federation, where I helped with expansions. Also most other games by that developer, I've done heavy testing for). I gotta say the experience was muuuuuuch better. That's a story for another day though.
 
The sad part is, it isnt truly just about greed with stuff like this, when it comes to creativity: they (and many other big studios) have simply dug themselves into a hole.

At this point, AAA game development is expensive to the point of absolute insanity because of the "graphics first" approach, and other elements like the need to cast ultra-expensive voice actors to do 5 million lines. And high expense means high risk. If that billion-dollar project flops, well... yeah that's an enormous amount of money down the drain.

So basically it's far too risky to try something new and creative at that level. They went too far with the whole graphics thing, dug too deep, and now they cant get back out.

Oh they technically could tone things down, as NONE of that stuff is actually necessary to make a great game, but with that approach having gone on for so long, endlessly improving graphics are EXPECTED by consumers, and that means it's mandatory. And has been for a very long time now. A vicious cycle.

The whole thing has gotten so bad that now they're having to dive into remakes of remakes in order to avoid risk.

It aint all bad though, despite what certain outlets would have you believe. I've said it 5 million times: The creativity is out there... everywhere, in fact. But you have to actually look somewhere else and step outside of your comfort zone to find it. I mean good grief there are entire genres that are utterly missing from the AAA space, but are outright thriving elsewhere.

From my vantage point, gaming has never been better. But then, I dont touch AAA stuff with a 200 foot pole (usually. I made an exception with Diablo 4 because "well I keep complaining about these, but when was the last time I TRIED one?" Predictable results, really, but hey, I tried a thing). I still watch that side of the industry though, it can be really funny at times.

I have noticed that for a long time. The graphic fidelity of games go up, but everything else goes down in quality. Then people wonder why day one patches have become the norm.

But I see what you mean though about companies putting themselves in a hole they cannot dig themselves out of with game graphics. Though the newer generations have part blame, in that they buy these trash AAA titles. But I say that with a heavy heart. Because I know none that do, know what's going on in making these games.

I am not a game developer, myself. Nor ever dipped my toes in the industry, ever. But I have started looking at what's going on and asking why is it this way. Watching news that pops out about the gaming industry. It's actually psychotic what ends up coming out from internally. Staff abuse, sexual harassment, and god knows what else. And that's just work relations and human resources. That's not accounting for the hell of game development itself. Nor the heinous treatment of customers, and the overuse of the legal system.

The AAA gaming industry has turned into a joke, at this point. And death is the punchline. Especailly if it continues like this.
 
I have noticed that for a long time. The graphic fidelity of games go up, but everything else goes down in quality. Then people wonder why day one patches have become the norm.

But I see what you mean though about companies putting themselves in a hole they cannot dig themselves out of with game graphics. Though the newer generations have part blame, in that they buy these trash AAA titles. But I say that with a heavy heart. Because I know none that do, know what's going on in making these games.

I am not a game developer, myself. Nor ever dipped my toes in the industry, ever. But I have started looking at what's going on and asking why is it this way. Watching news that pops out about the gaming industry. It's actually psychotic what ends up coming out from internally. Staff abuse, sexual harassment, and god knows what else. And that's just work relations and human resources. That's not accounting for the hell of game development itself. Nor the heinous treatment of customers, and the overuse of the legal system.

The AAA gaming industry has turned into a joke, at this point. And death is the punchline. Especailly if it continues like this.

Yeah, the stories that come from the depths of that side of the industry are pretty nasty. I've been following this stuff for ages now, partly out of a sort of morbid curiosity and partly because sometimes you'll get a story that is frankly just satisfying to watch (like some MTX-laden thing coming apart while clueless execs stare blankly at it).

But the stories of abuse in there are definitely nasty. I wont repeat any of them here, because some of them are just... yeah, really bad. Granted, this tends to focus around certain very specific companies (Activision for instance).
It's not just abuse though. One of the harsh realities of development is crunch. Where everyone will put themselves through loopy things like 90 hour work weeks to meet some badly thought out deadline. Even with indies, this can happen... heck, even just "one man studios" can have it happen. A single developer with nobody helping, deciding it's time to get something freaking DONE by a certain day (whether that's actually truly necessary or not, as sometimes it isnt, it's much harder to be sure when you're the only one there), and BOOM, 15 hour work days for awhile. Something like that. Whether it's AAA, AA, or indie, it's the same crunch. Though of course, crunch at the bigger companies is worse, because you also have all the abusive elements too...

I've thought for quite awhile that the AAA sector is potentially headed for another crash. Kinda like THE crash from the Atari era. All these different negative elements have been adding up, and there has been one AAA flop after another lately. Like, big, really high-profile flops, the sort that costs millions. Over and over and over again. Sooner or later, something is going to break. Not that I really mind, honestly. I've been wanting to see companies like Activision and EA get what's coming to them for a long time now.


Honestly one of the best things you or I or anyone into the hobby can do is to research purchases before making them, and ACTUALLY vote with our wallets. Not just SAY we're going to do it as half the bloody internet does (like that incident with the "boycott Call of Duty" group), but to ACTUALLY do it. Dont buy from nasty companies, instead find those who are deserving of support. And when you do find something you're going to buy, make sure you know what you're actually getting. Avoiding predatory monetization (or games that just cost way more than what they are worth) is honestly really freaking easy, but a lot of people just sort of roll with it because it takes, you know, actual effort to research like that. And also make sure others know about the nastier parts of what's going on.
 
Technically, it is.

Besides the 2002 remake, there was an on-rails shooting game for the Wii titled The Umbrella Chronicles which comprised of re-imaginings of 'The Mansion Incident' (RE1) and other games like RE3, but how it plays out is somewhat inaccurate. For example, Leon and Claire both entered the police station, yes. But they were not together the entire journey. In fact, they had to do different things to get the key items needed to access the secret tunnels, so they kept in contact with their radios. Whereas this game insisted on making it feel like it were entirely intended for co-op.

Then there's the movies which are basically retellings in a way. So it's like Capcom considers 1998 to be their top year ever. LOL.
 

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