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Noise

alex0103

Active Member
This is my last post for awhile. Sorry for too many posts, just curious that's all.

Do any of you have sensitivity to noise or noise pollution? I have sensitivity to bright lights to a lesser degree, strong smells or perfume or chemical smells can be a bit over whelming and sometimes being touched or certain fabrics can be uncomfortable. My main sensitivity is noise or should I say loud noises. I find myself getting very angry with noise pollution. Noises that wouldn't bother other people can be become intrusive and make me very agitated, nervous or angry or all of that at once. I can become hyper vigilant when it comes to noise, expecting it or worrying about it.

Anyone else here have this sensitivity?
 

Richelle-H

Relaxed Relativity Inspector
V.I.P Member
In my case it isn't so much sensitivity to noise but to certain sounds. Those, such as the cooing of a morning dove at 7 AM, can make me mental. It is all an interior state of mind and there is no indication on the outside as to my destress unless I start complaining out loud at the offending source.

I do notice even the most insignificant of sounds, but they only become annoying if they are at the wrong frequency and too persistent.

I do not have any real heavy sensitivity to odors, and in proof of that; I do not find the odor of skunk offensive, musky to be sure, but not offensive (maybe even a tiny bit pleasant?). Go figure that one out. :astonished:
 

alex0103

Active Member
In my case it isn't so much sensitivity to noise but to certain sounds. Those, such as the cooing of a morning dove at 7 AM, can make me mental. It is all an interior state of mind and there is no indication on the outside as to my destress unless I start complaining out loud at the offending source.

I do notice even the most insignificant of sounds, but they only become annoying if they are at the wrong frequency and too persistent.

I do not have any real heavy sensitivity to odors, and in proof of that; I do not find the odor of skunk offensive, musky to be sure, but not offensive (maybe even a tiny bit pleasant?). Go figure that one out. :astonished:
Yes bird noise can be particularly unpleasant. We have magpies here in UK and they make this awful trilling noise. Also pigeons cooing when on the roof top is bad. When we lived in Malta we had some kind of little birds that nested on top of the houses and the chirping noise they made in summer drove me nuts.
 

Neonatal RRT

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Many autistics, especially infants, toddlers, and small children will have auditory sensitivities and processing difficulties,...less so with adults,...as we learn to "get used to" noises in our environment. That said, hyperacucis remains common with autistic adults. Noise cancelling headphones are often helpful. A number of studies have shown some autistics can have difficulties with "habituation" or "discriminating" sounds in their environment, so every noise in the environment comes at us with equal intensity,...instead of say, focusing upon a voice and other noises fading into the background. Some people just are sensitive to sound,...I have the TV volume at level "10",...my wife likes it at "20",...and is often a source of conflict. A persistent tinnitus may also contribute,...it's what is known as a thalamo-cortico disrhythmia to the a combination of hyperexcitability of neurotransmitters, migrational abnormalities, and/or neuronal microanatomy abnormalities in the areas that process hearing. I have this issue. Throw in enlarged amygdalas (common to autism), and a person can be on "high alert" and "over sensitive" to environmental sounds. Some autistics can also detect sound frequencies that are beyond the abilities of most of the population,...most adults will top out at around 15K,...and I can hear clearly up to 25K.

Any one of us can have any one or combination of things going on.
 
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Progster

Gone sideways to the sun
V.I.P Member
Yes, I have hyperacusis and some noises are literally painful. I find it difficult to tune out background noise and so things like the neighbours' dogs barking drive me nuts. Like you describe, I become agitated and even angry.

Pigeons cooing I find soothing, though, that's one kind of noise opllution I actually welcome. What really gets me is ciccadas chirping outside.
 

Orange Glasses

Well-Known Member
I am extremely sensitive to certain sounds, such as back-up horns or the high pitched sound of a small dog barking. I had my hearing tested and was told by the Audiologist and my ENT doctor that my hearing was beyond the capability of their state-of-the-art testing booth. Just as I feared, my hearing was too good and I heard sounds that others never did. These noises were also physically painful as if someone had shoved a pencil into my eardrum. They determined that it was Hyperacusis, but that was before I discovered that I have HF ASD Level 1/Asperger’s.

For years I have always slept with quality foam earplugs that reduce sounds by 32db, but I still hear things. I always have a pair in my pocket for situations where the sound is beyond my coping abilities like parties, movie theaters, concerts, etc.

Certain lights, especially at night, are blinding and painful to look at, and certain cleaning agents such as Pine Sol are pure misery.

The joys of Autism are endless. :(
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Very low frequency sounds below say 60hz tend to annoy me more than anything. The sort of thing that can rattle walls...etc.. Usually kids with car audio systems who want to share their bass with the whole town.

I'm also not particularly fond of the landscapers with their leaf blowers. But their job is inevitable. That's when I put on my ear protectors....same ones I use at the firing range.
 

Neonatal RRT

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I had my hearing tested and was told by the Audiologist and my ENT doctor that my hearing was beyond the capability of their state-of-the-art testing booth. Just as I feared, my hearing was too good and I heard sounds that others never did.
Yes. Same experience.

My wife and I recently had to replace our old oven/stove,...so we splurged and got a nice one with the conduction cooktop,...amazing fast warm up. At any rate I am in the living room, she has a few pots on the stove top,...well, evidently, if the pots are too close together while the stovetop is on "high", it will cause an ultra-high frequency sound. I am in the living room, beside myself, going "WTF!!!" and my wife is in the kitchen, totally oblivious,...she can't hear it at all.

It is interesting how, in certain circumstances like this, I can detect all sorts of "inaudible" sounds, yet there are times when my wife is talking and there are other noises in the background, I can't discern what she is saying. I think it has to do with that "habituation" functioning.

I have a hard time with finding a "sweet spot" with background noise and intensity, as well. I have this 5-frequency "singing" tinnitus, and cannot be in a quiet room or wear noise cancelling headphones.
 

alex0103

Active Member
I am extremely sensitive to certain sounds, such as back-up horns or the high pitched sound of a small dog barking. I had my hearing tested and was told by the Audiologist and my ENT doctor that my hearing was beyond the capability of their state-of-the-art testing booth. Just as I feared, my hearing was too good and I heard sounds that others never did. These noises were also physically painful as if someone had shoved a pencil into my eardrum. They determined that it was Hyperacusis, but that was before I discovered that I have HF ASD Level 1/Asperger’s.

For years I have always slept with quality foam earplugs that reduce sounds by 32db, but I still hear things. I always have a pair in my pocket for situations where the sound is beyond my coping abilities like parties, movie theaters, concerts, etc.

Certain lights, especially at night, are blinding and painful to look at, and certain cleaning agents such as Pine Sol are pure misery.

The joys of Autism are endless. :(
No pun intended but that sounds horrendous and extreme
 

alex0103

Active Member
Yes. Same experience.

My wife and I recently had to replace our old oven/stove,...so we splurged and got a nice one with the conduction cooktop,...amazing fast warm up. At any rate I am in the living room, she has a few pots on the stove top,...well, evidently, if the pots are too close together while the stovetop is on "high", it will cause an ultra-high frequency sound. I am in the living room, beside myself, going "WTF!!!" and my wife is in the kitchen, totally oblivious,...she can't hear it at all.

It is interesting how, in certain circumstances like this, I can detect all sorts of "inaudible" sounds, yet there are times when my wife is talking and there are other noises in the background, I can't discern what she is saying. I think it has to do with that "habituation" functioning.

I have a hard time with finding a "sweet spot" with background noise and intensity, as well. I have this 5-frequency "singing" tinnitus, and cannot be in a quiet room or wear noise cancelling headphones.
I can't stand bass music emanating from cars. I curse a lot when I experience it. To me it is just noise. I prefer jazz and classical anyways, yes that's my choice not theirs but the difference is, I don't inflict my music on others. I don't understand that.

Yes and leaf blowers, lawn mowers, dogs barking, chainsaws, industrial tools etc all have the same impact on me.

I once lived not far from a church in Portsmouth (the UK one not the U.S place) and every two weeks for around an hour in the evening they would have church bell ringing practice. Absolutely drove me nuts, I even contemplated writing a letter of complaint to the church.
 

alex0103

Active Member
Yes. Same experience.

My wife and I recently had to replace our old oven/stove,...so we splurged and got a nice one with the conduction cooktop,...amazing fast warm up. At any rate I am in the living room, she has a few pots on the stove top,...well, evidently, if the pots are too close together while the stovetop is on "high", it will cause an ultra-high frequency sound. I am in the living room, beside myself, going "WTF!!!" and my wife is in the kitchen, totally oblivious,...she can't hear it at all.

It is interesting how, in certain circumstances like this, I can detect all sorts of "inaudible" sounds, yet there are times when my wife is talking and there are other noises in the background, I can't discern what she is saying. I think it has to do with that "habituation" functioning.

I have a hard time with finding a "sweet spot" with background noise and intensity, as well. I have this 5-frequency "singing" tinnitus, and cannot be in a quiet room or wear noise cancelling headphones.
We have a pub across the road that would have parties on a Saturday night and that meant lots of boom, boom bass music. When we first moved here , the first Saturday we were upstairs putting up a new wardrobe and I could hear it and it was making me even more stressed out with the IKEA wardrobe we were trying to put together. I kept saying "that music is doing my head in" to which she replied "what music, I can't hear anything".
 

alex0103

Active Member
Yes, I have hyperacusis and some noises are literally painful. I find it difficult to tune out background noise and so things like the neighbours' dogs barking drive me nuts. Like you describe, I become agitated and even angry.

Pigeons cooing I find soothing, though, that's one kind of noise opllution I actually welcome. What really gets me is ciccadas chirping outside.
Pigeon noises can be soothing, just not at 5am coming down the chimney. But yes, any other time it's not so bad and I don't mind it as much.
 

NDR2

Member
I’ve always been sensitive to loud noises. Even now when I’m in the subway station I often cover my ears as the trains pass. I never liked the sound of thunder or balloons bursting.
 

Suzanne

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Yes! Suddenly noises cause havoc to my brain and bright lights and the sun, hurts so much.

I was a child and could not understand why I was the only one in panic when shielding my eyes from the brightness of the sun, then, I discovered sun glasses and from that moment on wards, they are my life saver and I hyperventilate if I lose them. However, happily, a cheap shop opened fairly close to me which sells them at such an amazing price, that I got myself two pairs.

Ironically, I love my music at top volume, but that is because it is not sudden and when I put music on and it blairs out, I jot, so definately suddeness irriates me and yep, smells too.

As for fabric. There is a type of fabric that actually makes me sick.
 

Progster

Gone sideways to the sun
V.I.P Member
I remember when I was a kid that I was really, really scared by loud sounds. Thunderstorms would terrify me, send me into a panic and I would go under the blanket until it was over. There was a bird-scarer cannon that periodically made a loud boom! in a field near my house, and if I wanted to go to the stream, I had to pass by this cannon. One day it went off just as I was passing, and I was extremely scared to pass it from that day onwards. If for some reason I had to pass it, I would clamp my hands over my ears and run past as fast as I could, hoping it wouldn't fire.

I don't have big issues with lights, but these modern white street lights, energy-saving bulbs and LED lights really bother me. It's like having the sun shine in my eyes.
 
Vacuum cleaners, barking dogs, the incessant chatter of starlings, the constant chatter of insects eating on dusk-ridden plains, grasshoppers calling, the clacking of loose women’s heels in vacant corridors, the low basso emanation of heels impacting the threshold of floors, the high-pitched whine of saws and experienced runaway on electric motors without load.. I can retain my say many varying sounds effected me growing up and even the thought of them can still I still some amount of pain and withdrawal.. but I as well had to grow up within 300ft of a local fire station that at the time still used an air raid siren to announce calls 24/7 as pagers were still new and expensive and it was either that, landline or monitoring short wave radio persistently to be aware of happenings.
That and being conditioned to be more tolerant of noises.. and I make that sound far too acceptable; made existing far easier.. but to this day I’ve never been able to live in any major city, simple due to the noise. I can work there, I can stay temporarily.. but the more I remain, the harder it is to manage. I imagine I could get over it at some point at some extent but I feel no need to as I prefer the barren countryside and nature and can still operate all my equipment fairly easily, just the unexpected noises that still sometimes get to me, or ones that sneak up on me while focusing on managing something else. I have to say though that apparently I get benefit from my sensitive hearing as apparently I can hear many sounds and workings of machines that others would not usually hear or take notice of.. and I have found that helpful in many endeavours over the years.
 

alex0103

Active Member
Vacuum cleaners, barking dogs, the incessant chatter of starlings, the constant chatter of insects eating on dusk-ridden plains, grasshoppers calling, the clacking of loose women’s heels in vacant corridors, the low basso emanation of heels impacting the threshold of floors, the high-pitched whine of saws and experienced runaway on electric motors without load.. I can retain my say many varying sounds effected me growing up and even the thought of them can still I still some amount of pain and withdrawal.. but I as well had to grow up within 300ft of a local fire station that at the time still used an air raid siren to announce calls 24/7 as pagers were still new and expensive and it was either that, landline or monitoring short wave radio persistently to be aware of happenings.
That and being conditioned to be more tolerant of noises.. and I make that sound far too acceptable; made existing far easier.. but to this day I’ve never been able to live in any major city, simple due to the noise. I can work there, I can stay temporarily.. but the more I remain, the harder it is to manage. I imagine I could get over it at some point at some extent but I feel no need to as I prefer the barren countryside and nature and can still operate all my equipment fairly easily, just the unexpected noises that still sometimes get to me, or ones that sneak up on me while focusing on managing something else. I have to say though that apparently I get benefit from my sensitive hearing as apparently I can hear many sounds and workings of machines that others would not usually hear or take notice of.. and I have found that helpful in many endeavours over the years.
My son runs away and screams when I switch the vacuum on, he is on the spectrum too. He won't go in public toilets because of the loud air dryers. I hate the washing machine when it's on spin cycle.

We also live not far from a fire station and we are on the main road (traffic is constant) and the fire engines come this way past our house whenever there is a fire emergency call out.

We had a heatwave here in UK 2 weeks ago, it went up to 40C which is about 104 F. Very, very unusual, never been that temperature here ever. Not only was it uncomfortably hot but the fire engines kept going out several times that day, I am guessing because of bush and grass fires. I did feel great sympathy for those fire men though, the heat and having to tackle those numerous fires on such as hot day. But yeah the noise here is intolerable sometimes. We are heading to N.W Scotland in two days time for wild camping, can't wait to get away from this insanity in this city.
 

Leo Zed

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I remember when I was a kid that I was really, really scared by loud sounds...
I had the same problem. My cousins live in a small town in the state of New York. In the 70's the town used an air-raid siren to alert the volunteer fire department. That siren terrified the hell out of me every time it sounded. In fact, fire drills and tornado sirens send me into a panic to this day. I get this intense rush of adrenaline leaving me feeling as if lidocaine were injected into my spine.

Concerts don't work well for me either. I would forward to going to a concert, but, when the loud music started, all I could think about was leaving. I can't tolerate night clubs, weddings, sporting events or any other situation encumbered with loud noise. I am very sensitive to "auditory overload."
 

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