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Neurotherapy/Neurofeedback Therapy

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member
I want to recognize this is a topic mostly intended for treating comorbid conditions – I realize that autism is not, in itself, a mental health condition. In the spirit of full disclosure, I fall into the category where there are comorbid conditions and so my question is from that perspective.

Link to basic information about the treatment I am talking about:

Does anyone here have experience they are willing to share with this treatment? Does anybody know anything interesting about it, even anecdotally?

I searched past posts for this topic, but most of them are outdated, and I wonder if things have changed in the last few years.

Thanks for any input or thoughts that people are willing to share.
 

Thinx

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
From what I can see, this idea is in it's infancy, so could be many years yet before we see how useful or relevant it can be. It makes me think about EMDR and other therapies with trauma reducing aims. These do have some significant helpful effects for some people, but are not really fully understood yet, except as seeming to move along some trauma processing that has got stuck, so enabling healing. On the plus side, these are fairly non invasive treatments, not sure how true that is of so called neurotherapy.

I see references to electrical stimulating that make me cautious in the discussions of so called neurotherapy. There definitely isn't a sound basis of proven results yet, and it would be wise to look closely at any potential benefits and to enquire how clients are affected, also how non benefitting clients fare, do some people seem to be negatively affected? What possible damage to the brain can occur? As one would expect that any techniques that affect the brain significantly could have varied outcomes.
 

Leo Zed

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Having comorbid conditions and looking for non-drug treatments, I looked around a bit on the web and discovered a site that was a little more informative:

What Is Neurotherapy?

As it turns out, this therapy is readily available where I live. I am having a rough time now with depression and PTSD, so I am definitely going to ask my doctor and/or therapist about it. I had ECT in the past, and I was considering going through another round of it again. ECT tends to focus more on depression, whereas, neurotherapy can be used for several other conditions as well, including addiction. I am glad you brought it up. I will update you when I learn more about it.
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member
Having comorbid conditions and looking for non-drug treatments, I looked around a bit on the web and discovered a site that was a little more informative:

What Is Neurotherapy?

Thank you for the link. Yes, it is particularly interesting regarding non-drug treatments. I am not opposed to medication in any way, it just hasn’t been beneficial for me, and as a recovering addict, certain medication courses are just not a good idea.

I am hoping to pair some research with some anecdotal evidence, so @LeoZed, I would be happy to hear any opinions you have on it going forward.
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member
As one would expect that any techniques that affect the brain significantly could have varied outcomes.

I see references to electrical stimulating that make me cautious in the discussions of so called neurotherapy.

Yes, precisely, these are the things I am thinking about. Sometimes, it is interesting being on the fringes, other times I wish the old fashioned tried and true ways just worked for me.
 

Zhantera

Active Member
I've had both bio and neurofeedback.
I didn't really have the greatest experience with it, although I did complete the course of it suggested by my doctor. Mine was suggested for food addiction, ptsd and referred depression.
I did read a lot of peoples' experiences that seemed to get good results from it. For me, unfortunately, it caused very bad headaches, fatigue and bizarre outbursts.
 

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