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Late self diagnosis. Recovering alcoholic.

DrBadStrings

Active Member
V.I.P Member
Hi everyone,

I'm new to autism and still at the self-diagnosed stage but all signs strongly indicate that I'm on the spectrum, low needs and high masking. I'm in my early 40's and the idea was only just brought up when I was in rehab for alcoholism. Working with the psychologist there we figured that it's almost certain that I'm on the spectrum. Looking into an official diagnosis, unfortunately the rehab facility didn't have the resources to do it. But coming to this realization suddenly my entire life makes sense. The "Why" I've been looking for all my life has been answered. Now I'm just trying to learn as much as I can on the topic and make some connections within the community.

Thank you for having me.

P
 
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Welcome. I didn’t realize I was autistic until age 64. Then a lot more of my life made senses.

Congratulations on your recovery. That is excellent.
 
Welcome. I didn’t realize I was autistic until age 64. Then a lot more of my life made senses.

Congratulations on your recovery. That is excellent.
Thank you very much. After the psychologist there suggested I may be autistic I started reading up. In particular a book by Matthew Tinsley " Asperger Syndrome and Alcohol: Drinking to Cope? " which is half research and half anecdote from his own experiences and it felt like I was reading a book about myself.

After that I did a bunch of the same questionnaires that the psychologists use on my own and everyone kept indicating autism. It's still a self diagnosis at this point but I honestly have no doubts. It's like I finally understand myself and it's just a relief. Now I have a direction as I know I'm not alone in how I feel. I feel like I can finally start to really thrive on a personal level and not just do well at my job.

 
I drank to cope with sensory issues, brain fog, anxiety, restlessness, irritablility, discontentedness, bitterness, resentment, loneliness, emotional volatility you name it.

Painting a rosy picture aren't I? 😂
 
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Now that I know that autism is more than the stereotypical things shown on tv, I'm starting to see my uncle, who fought is whole life with alcoholism, who was branded as slow in early childhood, but was a brilliant mechanic and craftsman... I'm starting to look at him with different eyes.

When he was sober he was shy and awkward, he looked at others the same way I did, chin tucked down and never making eye contact. He was gentle and soft-spoken, and always taken advantage of by his "friends".

So many things are becoming clearer. Reading the testimonies on this forum is helping me see him differently.
 
I drank to cope with sensory issues, brain fog, anxiety, restlessness, irritablility, discontentedness, bitterness, resentment, loneliness, emotional volatility you name it.

Painting a rosy picture aren't I? 😂
Check, check, check, check, all of the above. But now the more I research, read, watch videos from others with autism talking about the different aspects I just keep seeing more and more of myself and my life explained in terms of how I've always reacted to the world. And what I can do to finally thrive. It's definitely an interesting moment in my life.
 
Hi and welcome to the forum. Alcohol seems to be the most common crutch we use as a social lubricant, it reduces our inhibitions and lets us socialise more freely but doesn't do us a lot of good in the long run. I'm glad to see you're finding your way.
 
It is a big moment when you have that awaking to the realization that you are on the spectrum. Many of us here have similar experiences of coming to this realization as an adult after living many years wondering why we didn't quite fit in and why some things were so hard for us but seemed so easy for others.

I drank plenty at times in my life and sometimes I think it certainly was a coping mechanism. Now I don't drink too much. I hope your recovery continues to go well. I love to run and it can be a healthy outlet to release my life frustrations. There are plenty of other possible outlets, it all depends on what you enjoy doing.
 
It is a big moment when you have that awaking to the realization that you are on the spectrum. Many of us here have similar experiences of coming to this realization as an adult after living many years wondering why we didn't quite fit in and why some things were so hard for us but seemed so easy for others.

I drank plenty at times in my life and sometimes I think it certainly was a coping mechanism. Now I don't drink too much. I hope your recovery continues to go well. I love to run and it can be a healthy outlet to release my life frustrations. There are plenty of other possible outlets, it all depends on what you enjoy doing.
Thanks. I only run when I'm scared. jk. I really enjoy going for walks and even when I'm at work I have access to trails within about a 5 minute walk. Interestingly enough even before thinking about the autism I already had an accommodation at work where if I'm starting to feel stressed I can go for a walk during the middle of the day. I just make up the time elsewhere. My boss is the type that allows for different flexibilities like that for folks in the office. I had 7 months sober before rehab so the walks have been something I've been doing to keep myself in check and deal with the stress that causes the cravings.
 
Hi everyone,

I'm new to autism and still at the self-diagnosed stage but all signs strongly indicate that I'm on the spectrum, low needs and high masking. I'm in my early 40's and the idea was only just brought up when I was in rehab for alcoholism. Working with the psychologist there we figured that it's almost certain that I'm on the spectrum. Looking into an official diagnosis, unfortunately the rehab facility didn't have the resources to do it. But coming to this realization suddenly my entire life makes sense. The "Why" I've been looking for all my life has been answered. Now I'm just trying to learn as much as I can on the topic and make some connections within the community.

Thank you for having me.

P
Congratulations on the sobriety - major problem kicked away. Late age diagnosis for autism isn't a negative. It puts all those weird thoughts to rest with a logical explanation. There is a lot to learn and see hanging out on this site. We all have a lot in common. This place is better than any therapy I've ever had. I don't regret anything in life, but I am very aware that knowing you have some form of ASD would have been beneficial. At least, it is helping me now. Welcome - have fun.
 
I relate to both the late diagnosis and the alcoholism. I'm so much happier without the alcohol but I'll hang on to the autism.
 
Hello and welcome @DrBadStrings. Hope this place is helpful to you. There are lots of discussions regarding sobriety and the reasons that some of us have had trouble with alcohol and other substances. I am in recovery from drugs and alcohol myself, and learning about autism has been the key to staying sober.
 

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