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It's the end of the world as we know it...

Levitator

Well-Known Member
...and I feel fine. So, I always wondered why it is that if God is around, and he is molding everything like clay, why don't you see him do it? Then, I wound up deep in the faith and I started noticing some very strange things happening. It began to seem like the world would transform overnight. Specifically, it was mostly the people that changed, and usually not for the better. It seemed as if the people I used to know had died inside a great deal, and suddenly they are less ethical, less caring, more detached. It was like that old movie Dark City where, at the end of the cycle, the creatures scramble everyone's personalities in order to diversify their stock of minds. So, as far as I can tell, what this means is that I've already parted ways with the world. Ok, so imagine that you are in the world, and God alters the past. Well, then you are inside those changes, and your mind gets updated to match, so you don't notice anything changed. What if later, you are taken out of the world, and now you and the world are being molded separately. What you are going to see now is how God revises the world and alters it. Most disturbingly, you have a front row seat to the fickle, ephemeral nature of unsaved/mortal human life. They're rotting every day. They are becoming less of who they are. They are dying, and it's terrible. It means I'm sitting next to God and watching him play both potter and hospice worker to the world. It's really disturbing, even though I should be glad that I'm with God, and not the doomed rock that's now falling away.

 
There are a lot of ways one can interpret the circus that is the world as it stands right now. I'm under the impression that the world is very much coming to an end, or at least the world as we've known it. I tend to view human history through the Turchin or Spengler models, as there is a disturbing regularity with which civilizations rise and either reform or crumble. It's one of the reasons I believe so strongly in God, because only an intelligence infinitely greater than our own could design such a beautifully intricate self-regulating system. A series of great cycles which govern man, nature, and indeed the entire universe.
At the same time, I also believe our age is disturbingly unique in the hellscape we've managed to carve out for ourselves. Anyone who's read the mouse utopia studies knows what I'm talking about. Once you see it, you cannot unsee it. On top of that, if you believe in the Turchin model of history, you also know that we're at the end of all 3 cycles. I believe the last time all 3 cycles ended simultaneously, the Western Roman Empire collapsed and brought on the dark ages.
To that end, has anyone else noticed that there's always a climate disaster EVERY SINGLE TIME the 1500-year cycle ends? Shortly after Western Rome fell, there was massive global cooling mainly brought on by a spike in volcanic activity. Similarly, even before that, the Bronze Age collapse was precipitated by widespread crop failures caused by more global cooling and severe, prolonged droughts.
 
I'm not much of a student of past civilizations and I don't know who Turchin or Spengler are. Looking at things Biblically, I've noticed things like the "cannot buy or sell" phenomenon, where it says that those who do not accept the mark of the beast cannot engage in business. One of my current posts is about how I was about beaten half to death not two months ago attempting to pay my rent because my landlady was a stark lunatic who didn't think it counts against her to do vile things to someone odd-looking, or whatever the hell it is they think when they look at me.

Jesus said "follow me and let the dead bury their dead", and I do see the phenomenon where the entire population of the world is beginning to appear dead inside. They have no conscience, and they are randomly seized by bouts of appalling madness while the rest of them act like it's normal, or like they can't see the problem. Their conscience is dead. Life has felt to me, like The Walking Dead for a long time, where I am surrounded by a multitude of creatures that idle in peace with each other because there is nothing to animate them, but when you introduce life into their midst, it enlivens them just enough to try to bite you.

The Bible says that Jesus is the True Vine, and that he can trim you, prune you, and he can even graft you into a different branch. Also mentioned is the option he has of cutting you off and burning you as refuse if you refuse to represent an acceptable branch. Anyway, branching, to me, alludes to the possibility that the universe is not at all linear. It's not a straight timeline. If you are into sci-fi, then the word "multiverse" might come to mind, but I think it's massively arrogant to try to draw your own map of the universe. I think a more humble and simple perspective is that you've been grafted into a story alongside relevant people, and it's up to you to make the best of it. You're told that the past passes away, so then history becomes irrelevant. You're told that today's evil is enough unto itself, so tomorrow is irrelevant. You're supposed to stop pretending you're Dr. Strange, be humble, and simple, and live in the here-and-now, because you're not a creature that was meant to understand the universe nor God's business.
 
I'm not much of a student of past civilizations and I don't know who Turchin or Spengler are. Looking at things Biblically, I've noticed things like the "cannot buy or sell" phenomenon, where it says that those who do not accept the mark of the beast cannot engage in business. One of my current posts is about how I was about beaten half to death not two months ago attempting to pay my rent because my landlady was a stark lunatic who didn't think it counts against her to do vile things to someone odd-looking, or whatever the hell it is they think when they look at me.

Jesus said "follow me and let the dead bury their dead", and I do see the phenomenon where the entire population of the world is beginning to appear dead inside. They have no conscience, and they are randomly seized by bouts of appalling madness while the rest of them act like it's normal, or like they can't see the problem. Their conscience is dead. Life has felt to me, like The Walking Dead for a long time, where I am surrounded by a multitude of creatures that idle in peace with each other because there is nothing to animate them, but when you introduce life into their midst, it enlivens them just enough to try to bite you.

The Bible says that Jesus is the True Vine, and that he can trim you, prune you, and he can even graft you into a different branch. Also mentioned is the option he has of cutting you off and burning you as refuse if you refuse to represent an acceptable branch. Anyway, branching, to me, alludes to the possibility that the universe is not at all linear. It's not a straight timeline. If you are into sci-fi, then the word "multiverse" might come to mind, but I think it's massively arrogant to try to draw your own map of the universe. I think a more humble and simple perspective is that you've been grafted into a story alongside relevant people, and it's up to you to make the best of it. You're told that the past passes away, so then history becomes irrelevant. You're told that today's evil is enough unto itself, so tomorrow is irrelevant. You're supposed to stop pretending you're Dr. Strange, be humble, and simple, and live in the here-and-now, because you're not a creature that was meant to understand the universe nor God's business.

Won't ever stop me or the rest of humanity as a whole from trying. History, to me, is more than a list of man's greatest accomplishments. It's the ledger of our greatest mistakes and failures. I too notice the revelations prophecies coming true in everyday life. I use history as a guidepost for what comes next, because I never want to say with certainty that Christ is coming soon. He is coming, and he is absolutely inevitable. He will arrive when he is supposed to, and not a minute before nor after. Thankfully, preparing for his arrival is simple. It's surviving 'The Walking Dead' in the meantime that takes up so much of mine and others time.
I don't have all the answers, only the practice of experience and common sense to guide me. I probably have a lot of things right. I'm almost 100% certain I have many more things wrong. But that's the fun of the game to me at least. To know that you know nothing, and to keep learning. I will never truly understand the grand tapestry in this lifetime, but I have faith that one day, on the other side, I will. And I have faith that Christ will guide and protect me through this uniquely horrifying era. It's admittedly hard to have faith these days, and I find myself straying more often than I'd like to, but I refuse to give up.
 
Won't ever stop me or the rest of humanity as a whole from trying. History, to me, is more than a list of man's greatest accomplishments. It's the ledger of our greatest mistakes and failures. I too notice the revelations prophecies coming true in everyday life. I use history as a guidepost for what comes next, because I never want to say with certainty that Christ is coming soon. He is coming, and he is absolutely inevitable. He will arrive when he is supposed to, and not a minute before nor after. Thankfully, preparing for his arrival is simple. It's surviving 'The Walking Dead' in the meantime that takes up so much of mine and others time.
I don't have all the answers, only the practice of experience and common sense to guide me. I probably have a lot of things right. I'm almost 100% certain I have many more things wrong. But that's the fun of the game to me at least. To know that you know nothing, and to keep learning. I will never truly understand the grand tapestry in this lifetime, but I have faith that one day, on the other side, I will. And I have faith that Christ will guide and protect me through this uniquely horrifying era. It's admittedly hard to have faith these days, and I find myself straying more often than I'd like to, but I refuse to give up.

In my journey, I am advised that it is more worthwhile to see than to understand. And we, indeed, have forum members who think more in images than with words, and you can see it plainly in their writing which is strange, fascinating, and mysterious. Never mind what foolishness the world thinks of them, since it won't make any effort at all to understand. The fall of Babylon tells you that even language passes away, so at the intersection of words and understanding, you're looking at something that dissolves along with the earth among temporary things. You won't have any use for your own understanding anyway, when you get to a place where "whatsoever you ask for will be given to you".

The problem with excessive reliance on history is that you are looking at the same world which is destined to pass away. The here-and-now is about you, and what you can do with what is in front of you, of which the most important are obviously the people in your life.
 
In my journey, I am advised that it is more worthwhile to see than to understand. And we, indeed, have forum members who think more in images than with words, and you can see it plainly in their writing which is strange, fascinating, and mysterious. Never mind what foolishness the world thinks of them, since it won't make any effort at all to understand. The fall of Babylon tells you that even language passes away, so at the intersection of words and understanding, you're looking at something that dissolves along with the earth among temporary things. You won't have any use for your own understanding anyway, when you get to a place where "whatsoever you ask for will be given to you".

The problem with excessive reliance on history is that you are looking at the same world which is destined to pass away. The here-and-now is about you, and what you can do with what is in front of you, of which the most important are obviously the people in your life.

Now you're starting to sound like my father. That's a compliment I assure you!
 
I'm hesitant to throw in my two cents, knowing that you two are having a very tough life, and you draw a lot of comfort from thinking of the world as a temporary place.

John 3:16-17:
For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.

This is the exact same world which Jesus loved so much, that he made his sacrifice. And we are as responsible for his sacrifice as anyone else in this world.

Yes, the world is awful. And the world has treated you badly.

But, also, we are of the world, and every time we sin, we are doing the kiss of Judas which put Jesus on the cross.

And as long as we live, there is unfinished work to do.

Philippians 1:6:
And I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ.

I don't quite know my purpose in this world, but I do believe that every day which I live, is a day that is divinely granted to me by God for that as-of-yet-unknown purpose. I don't know where I'm leading with this. I guess I just too-optimistically hope we can all come to a place to understand why we're here in our remaining days, and live out our lives with some semblance of joy in serving God, and learn to understand why Jesus chose to die for even those who wronged us.

Hebrews 4 came to mind while reading this thread as well.

Maybe the End Times are here, but most available signs suggest it isn't... and ironically, I've studied the Bible enough to conclude that the "trigger" for the End Times is when Christianity is at its peak... which means, the best way to bring them on is to keep spreading the Good News to others.
 
I'm hesitant to throw in my two cents, knowing that you two are having a very tough life, and you draw a lot of comfort from thinking of the world as a temporary place.

John 3:16-17:


This is the exact same world which Jesus loved so much, that he made his sacrifice. And we are as responsible for his sacrifice as anyone else in this world.

Yes, the world is awful. And the world has treated you badly.

But, also, we are of the world, and every time we sin, we are doing the kiss of Judas which put Jesus on the cross.

And as long as we live, there is unfinished work to do.

Philippians 1:6:


I don't quite know my purpose in this world, but I do believe that every day which I live, is a day that is divinely granted to me by God for that as-of-yet-unknown purpose. I don't know where I'm leading with this. I guess I just too-optimistically hope we can all come to a place to understand why we're here in our remaining days, and live out our lives with some semblance of joy in serving God, and learn to understand why Jesus chose to die for even those who wronged us.

Hebrews 4 came to mind while reading this thread as well.

Maybe the End Times are here, but most available signs suggest it isn't... and ironically, I've studied the Bible enough to conclude that the "trigger" for the End Times is when Christianity is at its peak... which means, the best way to bring them on is to keep spreading the Good News to others.

What I find is that the moment you begin speaking the truth to people the world's immune system gathers around you like white blood cells so that you are walled in. Coincidentally with regard to Jesus saving "the world" we are emphasizing the problem with words. "The world" can mean different things to different people in different contexts. To me, it means the established systems of thought and behavior, which are mostly made of people. Someone else might be fixated on rocks and stone. I'm not sure in what sense Jesus saves "the world", because Revelation says it's doomed a thousand years after the coming of New Jerusalem. What is certain, is that whatever "world" Jesus saves, it's a world of souls, not rocks.
 

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