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Featured Is it possible for doctors to not detect any signs of Asperger's/autism in babies or toddlers?

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by Stan Z., Feb 2, 2019.

  1. Stan Z.

    Stan Z. Active Member

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    Or was I an exception?

    When I was younger (maybe around 5-11years old), I did some pretty unconventional things. I intentionally cut my left ear lobe with scissors during class in pre-K because I didn't know better (thankfully, it healed), I joked about the word "sex" in third grade even though I didn't know what it meant (and got in trouble for it), I was yelling out of control in 4th grade, and wandered in and out of classes in 6th grade. But do you want to know what the worst part about this is? I didn't get diagnosed with Asperger's until I was 12 in 2013.

    And my parents collectively said that the doctors, who were taking care of my health when I was born said to them that there was nothing mentally wrong with me, even though I got diagnosed by a certified school psychologist 12 years later.

    So, is it weird to be diagnosed late? Because even after my diagnosis, my dad still can't believe I'm autistic because he doesn't want to have the burden of having a child with mental problems (My dad and step mom are Liberian, btw, and they are not fond of mental disorders/illnesses in their culture).
     
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  2. Adora

    Adora Well-Known Member

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    Yes it’s possible,many people including myself didn’t find out that they are on the spectrum until they are adults,also put in consideration that people with Aspergers may not have the development issues as those who are classically autistic aswell,also symptoms can be dismissed as something else like for example someone may be written off as just being shy and they will grow out of it eventually and sadly years down the track they get misdiagnosed with different mental health conditions before they discover they have Aspergers.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2019
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  3. Danno

    Danno Active Member

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    I'm 28 and just starting the route to diagnosis myself, so don't feel bad about a late diagnosis. The way I look at it, the professionals are getting better and better at picking things up earlier on - schools can quite often notice the first signs these days, and parents know more about what to look out for at home as well, which didn't happen so much when I was younger. For comparison, one of my sister's friends recently had her little boy diagnosed at 3 years old...
     
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  4. Isadoorian

    Isadoorian Well Known Chat Member, Welcomer of Newcomers V.I.P Member

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    Yes it's possible. The symptoms sometimes don't become noticeable/more pronounced until a little later in life. Some people here have gotten their Diagnoses later in life, often in their 40s, 50s or 60s.
     
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  5. Pats

    Pats Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Of course it's possible. Sometimes things that stand out can still be missed. Parents are usually the best judge (if they're open to things) if there's something going on with their child. A doctor sees them for 5 minutes.
     
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  6. WittyAspie

    WittyAspie The One And Only V.I.P Member

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    It is possible to pick up on signs of autism in toddlers, but it rarely happens. I have a son who recently turned 2. I have suspected for awhile now that he is on the spectrum, but that is because I know what I am looking for. I have two other children who have been diagnosed and I am on the spectrum as well. If it was not for my prior experience with autism I would likely have no clue why my son behaves in somewhat peculiar ways.

    My oldest daughter showed a lot of signs of autism when she was 1-2 years old. But at the time I had never even heard of Asperger's Syndrome, so I was at a loss trying to understand some of her more difficult behaviors. She did not receive a diagnosis until she was 5 or 6, after I had received mine.
     
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  7. Ginseng

    Ginseng Christian V.I.P Member

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    Doctors are often so poor at this. It amazes me when they can diagnose anyone.
     
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  8. china autie

    china autie friend to dogs and frogs and cats

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    Yes, very very very possible for docs to miss this.

    I suppose that your dad won't listen but Aspergers' and other forms of Autism are not technically "mental problems." Some of us do have mental health challenges in addition to our different neurology.

    We can accept that we are autistic or we can fight it or ignore it. You have to find your own peace with this one, especially if your parents are not able to be supportive.

    Even people we love can say lots of stuff that is hurtful or unfeeling.

    You are you and you are worth being here.
     
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  9. GrownupGirl

    GrownupGirl Tempermental Artist

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    When I was a kid Asperger's wasn't even officially recognized yet, plus I'm female. So it's not that unusual at all.
     
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  10. BrokenBoy

    BrokenBoy 戯言使い(Nonsense User)

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    I had shown signs at 3
     
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  11. Progster

    Progster Gone sideways to the sun V.I.P Member

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    Even very young babies of less than a year old can respond socially to people by looking at them and smiling, or tracking people with their gaze as they mve around the room. I have heard it said that one sign in babies of autism is that they don't respond to people this way, they may be unaware of the social significance of a smile or other social gesture. Of course, this is not definitive and probably not enough for a diagnosis, I think they need to have some developmental history which babies don't yet have.

    I don't know what traits I had as a baby, if any, but as a young child up to the age of 5 or 6, I had obsessive behaviour, meltdowns, sensory sensitivity, refusing to do things that my parents or teachers told me to do and a lack of social awareness. I also had a very wide vocabulary for my age - emotionally immature, but mentally beyond my years - this is quite common in kids with Asperger's.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2019
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  12. Mr Allen

    Mr Allen Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    It'll be 20 years in October since I was diagnosed at the age of 23.

    Autism was never on the table when I was a kid, they all thought I was "odd" or "special" (I hate that word! Contrary to popular opinion I am NOT retarded)
     
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  13. Graphin

    Graphin Toilet curver V.I.P Member

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    I don't see anything wrong with that people joke about words all the time without knowing the meaning.

    My kindergarden and school did push a lot for an assesment for autism, now I'm 16 and still trying to get a diagnosis.
     
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  14. Mary Terry

    Mary Terry Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    My nephew was diagnosed at age 2 years. He is now nearly 30 years old. The behaviors that led his father (my brother) to seek evaluation was regression in speech, refusal to make eye contact, rages/meltdowns for things that babies usually don't care about or respond to, obsession with lining up toy cars but never playing with them, refusal to interact with anyone, and echolalia as his only form of verbal communication.

    While my brother, his wife and my nephew were being evaluated at some place in Missouri that specialized in autism, my brother handed my nephew his laptop computer to keep him occupied while they talked with the doctor. Nephew quickly began typing extensive words on the laptop. The doctor asked to see what he had been typing. It was a product warranty disclaimer (i.e., legalese) that nephew apparently read somewhere and memorized. He was only 2 years old at the time.

    The medical community is getting a lot better at detecting autism as society learns more about it. The attentiveness of parents is another crucial factor in seeking a diagnosis.
     
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  15. MeghanWithAnH

    MeghanWithAnH Active Member

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    There are signs in toddlers and often even in babies, but many professionals don't know what to look for. My parents knew something was different about me since I was a baby, but no one even considered Aspergers until I figured it out myself in high school. Even then, no one really believed me until I finally got an official diagnosis last year, at age 29. Many people, including many professionals, have a very narrow view of what autism spectrum disorders look like, so if you don't fit that stereotype perfectly then they are likely to miss you. Things are improving, but slowly.

    Edited to add:
    My cousin, who is very similar to me but is 20 years younger, was diagnosed in preschool. That just goes to show how much things have been changing over the past few decades.
     
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  16. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    There's simply no telling just how many qualified physicians may have overlooked diagnosing forms of autism in children, let alone adults. That the CDC's claim of 1 in every 68 persons to be autistic may be erroneous at the present, perhaps to change in the future.

    Not to mention that diagnostics continue to evolve, such as the DSM-IV to the DSM-V, as well as other protocols like the ICD-10 and the ICD-11 soon to follow. From overly-pedantic interpretations of such medical protocols, to physicians choosing to "freelance" them. No telling how this can impact a fair and proper diagnosis of autism.

    And then you have to consider one exposure that seldom changes in the professional medical community. The exposure of the public to medical malpractice. The ultimate oxymoron - "professional incompetence".
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2019
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  17. Ylva

    Ylva Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    It's not so much that they miss it as that they are convinced any diagnosable condition has to be something "wrong" with you, when all it is (and not its symptoms) is a difference in perception.
     
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  18. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Excellent point. Something that is a significant part of this equation.

    However this is also a dynamic that isn't likely to change significantly given a lack of parity between Neurotypical and Neurodiverse people, let alone those who elect to become medical professionals qualified to deliver such a diagnosis.

    That gap in perception, and how it can "color" most any diagnosis. One perhaps akin to pregnant women when making their first visit to a male obstetrician. The chance of something being "lost in translation".

    Wouldn't we all prefer to be diagnosed for being on the spectrum of autism by a medical professional who they themselves is autistic? Certainly, I sure would. Even as a parent of a potentially autistic infant, I'd have more confidence with an autistic doctor, apart from one specializing in pediatric cases of autism.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
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  19. inkfingers

    inkfingers 19 year old Aspie artist and Jesus follower

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    Unfortunately, it's not too unusual for kids on the spectrum to be diagnosed late. I was only diagnosed last year (I'm 19). Perhaps you could explain to your parents that autism is not a mental illness, it is a matter of your brain being wired differently.
     
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  20. nuskone

    nuskone I NEED WAGECUCKERY

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    one does one, with the knowledge that most recognizable symptoms are of social nature, recognize signs of autism in such a young child? genuinely curious here. i was used to the idea that people with asperger get diagnosed if they're lucky at 5-6 years, so this is new to me
     
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