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I just got my diagnosis but I am a bit confused.

Discussion in 'Help and Support' started by CynBer96, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. CynBer96

    CynBer96 New Member

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    Hello,
    I literally just got my diagnosis 5 minutes ago over the phone.
    They told me I have the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum because they don't see Autism, Aspergers or any of the other types as seperate diagnosis anymore.
    Is that true? I went in to get a possible diagnosis for Aspergers because I was convinced I have it, but now I am even more confused because I have been diagnosed but the way of it is all a little bit strange.
     
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  2. Chance

    Chance "all who wander are not lost" - Tolkien V.I.P Member

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    Maybe the best way to understand it...ASD is like an "Umbrella"
    Tucked up under my ASD Umbrella ASD, but also SPD, mild OCD, PTSD (childhood trauma), mild Tourettes, i-ADHD (I disagree), Anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and that big ball of fun called depression... Oh frikkn joy!!!

    Co-morbid is what they are referring too... ASD isn't really a stand alone thing at all, and they will probably add to this dx as time passes... Mine wasn't like some rabbit hat trick. It took time and they still look at stuff at times, and re-think it.

    Welcome to controlled crazy... : )
     
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  3. Warmheart

    Warmheart Something nerdy this way comes V.I.P Member

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    Welcome here. :) Yes, they use a simple, catch-all diagnosis now, reflecting the many commonalities rather than differences.

    This way, higher support needs individuals can get the more intensive supports in place, while those with more variable support needs can still qualify (in educational systems, employment environments, and under insurance) for tailored supports and accommodations when their ASD diagnosis is disclosed.
     
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  4. OlLiE

    OlLiE Well-Known Member

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    same here, not really that bothered by the label though,
    just want to learn to live with the symptoms
     
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  5. CynBer96

    CynBer96 New Member

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    I guess that makes sense, I would have preferred to actually have a proper diagnosis though, I think it would make it easier for people to understand because if I say at a job interview that I am in the Autism Spectrum I am more nervous about it then when I would say I have Aspergers I think, because many people have a complete wrong image in their heads about people on the spectrum. I will soon have another appointment to speak about my diagnosis so I guess I will find out a bit more then, I hope at least.
     
  6. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Curious for being in Europe when it sounds like you were diagnosed exclusively based on US DSM-V protocols rather than the ICD-10.

    The DSM-V eliminated "Aspergers Syndrome" in 2013 and replaced it with the three tiers of "Autism Spectrum Disorder". (ASD)

    Though frankly I see mentioning that one is on the spectrum not to be particularly helpful in a job interview. Personally I don't see it as a "disability" as such. And as others have mentioned, it doesn't preclude being discriminated against despite civil laws to the contrary.
     
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  7. CynBer96

    CynBer96 New Member

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    I am not sure about the diagnosis system really. I have done tests in the UK, but I will be moving to the Netherlands in a couple of months, my home country, and once I have a health insurance I will be wanting to get a second opinion.
    I don't really know much about it yet since I only got diagnosed a little bit earlier, but I know that I personally feel so incredibly different to most people that I am just worried that if I mention it in a job interview that they will use it against me, even though I know they are legally not allowed to do that.
    I feel like I probably will just not mention it until I get the job. I also have Fibromyalgia and a sleep disorder, I don't know the name for it for a second but I have been diagnosed with them too and I have always been very cautious about mentioning it to possible employers, I feel like I will be the same now I have been diagnosed with being on the spectrum.
    I definitely still have a lot to learn about it though.
     
  8. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I'd think it would be terribly confusing if those currently using the ICD-10 start to gravitate towards using the DSM-V protocols instead. Not sure what's going on over there. Though I suspect there's a possibility that in moving to the Netherlands that you might be diagnosed under the ICD-10 which I believe still formally recognizes Aspergers Syndrome.

    Be careful about any assumption that civil laws will protect you from job discrimination. Most any prospective employer is likely to be skilled in getting around such limitations if they choose to do so.
     
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  9. CynBer96

    CynBer96 New Member

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    So the DSM-V is just diagnosing the Autism spectrum and the ICD-10 diagnose the seperate conditions? Because to me, PDD-NOS, Aspergers and Autism all seem so different. I do think that in the Netherlands they recognize Aspergers as a individual condition, rather than all of them in 1, but I am not sure.

    That is what I thought, that is why I am so cautious about telling any possible future employers about any of my disorders, because I know they will find something else why they can't employ me if they know, probably. I think it is best to just show them what I can do at the job, and keep it to myself really.
     
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  10. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    It is rather complicated. More so perhaps as it seems there is momentum to bring the different protocols together. I like the notion that autism is perceived to be on a spectrum of traits and behaviors.

    However IMO the DSM-V and its three levels of diagnostics are too broad and ambiguous compared to the classic diagnostics of Aspergers Syndrome. And many of us believe that the DSM-V has been heavily influenced by both politicians and insurers to contain the cost of such health care to those on the spectrum who may truly need it. Admittedly this is a political and economic dynamic that goes well beyond the borders of the US these days.

    I think your concerns are quite valid under the circumstances. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2018
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  11. Progster

    Progster Gone sideways to the sun V.I.P Member

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    I was diagnosed in the UK and with the DSM, too (DSM IV in my case). I think this is unusual, though.
     
  12. Mr Allen

    Mr Allen Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I was a bit put off by the "label" at first, I thought "Oh no there's summat else wrong with me!", then over the years I've kind of got used to it, I still don't like being Aspie though, for want of a better word, if I was "normal", I'd have a better chance of getting a job.
     
  13. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Thanks for posting. I find this diagnosis issue fascinating, although frankly I also find it alarming.

    While I'd like to see the planet on the same page regarding autism, I'd prefer another "playbook" besides the DSM-V. A diagnostic protocol that projects a will to help people. Not simply contain costs to fulfill political and economic agendas.
     
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  14. Streetwise

    Streetwise very cautious contributor V.I.P Member

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    do you fall asleep when you are working ?if not don't mention it !I have a friend who has a sleep disorder and she sometimes was asleep in the afternoon !doesn't seem to have been a problem with her employers .
    i'm in the UK and I was diagnosed with HFA !but they said yes some people still call it Aspergers syndrome !the presumption is that if you have AS you don't have any problems !but if you are diagnosed with HFA you would be looked at differently .
    from what I've just seen on a website from the netherlands it will depend on whether this think you are high functioning or have Aspergers syndrome -there was no info on what standard they use .
     
  15. Bolletje

    Bolletje Potato chip wizard V.I.P Member

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    @CynBer96 I was diagnosed in the Netherlands, they use the umbrella diagnosis of ASD here as well. Although when I was diagnosed, my psychologist told me that my place on the spectrum is on the higher functioning part, and that previously, I would have been diagnosed with Aspergers.
     
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  16. clg114

    clg114 Still crazy, after all these years. Staff Member V.I.P Member

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    This is how it is. If you think that your diagnosis is based solely on what is best for you, then you are probably wrong. Hopefully they still use the ICD-10 in the Netherlands and you will get a diagnosis that is not politically and economically influenced.
     
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  17. OkRad

    OkRad Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    everyone is confused. I go in and out of the diagnosis depnding on what my therapists had for breakfast. I am not being a wise-acre. But it's all over the place depending on god knows what. Maybe it's what I had for breakfast?
     
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  18. CynBer96

    CynBer96 New Member

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    Luckily I don't have that problem, my sleep disorder has more to do with nights. Sometimes I can easily sleep 12/14 hours a night, and when I wake up I am still tired all day, but other nights I can't sleep whatsoever, very often it has to do with the amount of pain I am in but also very often there is no explanation for it. Because I now have been diagnosed with physical disorders but also something mental I just am really worried. I think I will have to work in a supermarket or something behind a till just purely because I physically can't handle anything to difficult, but then I have the social issue. I do think I have to just keep that quiet and try my best to not show how hard I actually find social situations.
    I haven't got a clue really, I am Dutch, but when I last got seen about something on the spectrum I was pretty young so I can't really remember and the system might have changed by now.
    But I do think I might want to ask my doctor once I have the health insurance.
     
  19. CynBer96

    CynBer96 New Member

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    I definitely understand that. I have always felt strange and different. I always got bullied in school, so badly that it is a surprise I am still actually here. Now I will be 22 next month and I feel a lot better. I am engaged, hoping to get married in 2019, hoping to get pregnant at the end of the year and hoping for a nice little house in a couple of months. Life seems good, but I still notice every single day how different I am and when I move in a few months and when I will look for a job I definitely am going to keep this diagnosis quiet because I definitely think people have the wrong impression of people that are on the spectrum. My fiance and I think that he also has Aspergers, so I guess it kind of makes sense that we are so good together.
    I also always had issues with boys and girls when I was younger, when I liked someone I always used to scare them, I still don't know why, but it never worked out. Now I just think that it is because of the Autism Spectrum, I am just a weird one, and my fiance knows it. But that is a good thing in this case.
     
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  20. Southern Discomfort

    Southern Discomfort Smarter than the Average Bear V.I.P Member

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    Don't get too hung up on labels, they're all the same thing really. Call yours what you like, Asperger's, High Functioning Autism, Autistic Spectrum Condition. It's all the same.
     
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