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Greatshield17

Claritas Prayer Group#9435
I’m going to the supermarket today and am hoping to get my hands on some local-produced dairy products, I plan on making butter and yogurt with them. Does anyone have any recipes and/or advice on making low-lactose dairy products? I heard that sour cream is just fermented cream, the same way that yogurt is fermented milk; if that’s true, than can you make sour cream the same way you make yogurt? (As shown in the video below)

 
"The easiest way to do this is to add lactase to the milk."
How Lactose Free Milk Is Made


Are you lactose intolerant?

Or are you allergic to some particular animal's milk?

For example, I am not lactose intolerant, but I can't use cow milk
because I'm allergic to it. I can use goat milk, because I am not
allergic to caprine products, just bovine. Also can use sheep milk.
 
"The easiest way to do this is to add lactase to the milk."
How Lactose Free Milk Is Made


Are you lactose intolerant?

Or are you allergic to some particular animal's milk?

For example, I am not lactose intolerant, but I can't use cow milk
because I'm allergic to it. I can use goat milk, because I am not
allergic to caprine products, just bovine. Also can use sheep milk.
Thanks! Yeah I’m just lactose intolerant, I don’t have milk allergies.
 
Might have good luck if you can ever find a farmer's market sometime--or telephone your local feed store & ask if they have regulars with dairy cows. Feed stores are farmer hangouts--always have been!

Good luck on your project!
 
buy Lactaid or Meyenberg Goat Milk or Rice/Oat milk etc and make cheese, yogurt, kefir, etc from those.
 
"The easiest way to do this is to add lactase to the milk."
How Lactose Free Milk Is Made


Are you lactose intolerant?

Or are you allergic to some particular animal's milk?

For example, I am not lactose intolerant, but I can't use cow milk
because I'm allergic to it. I can use goat milk, because I am not
allergic to caprine products, just bovine. Also can use sheep milk.
I love sheep's milk yogurt. There's this one brand I adore, but it's about eight dollars a pint, so I go to the grocery store and memorize the "sell by date", and I come in the week that it will have to be thrown out so that I can get it on clearance.
 
Yogurt and sour cream are interchangable. Just use plain yogurt and it'll taste great on tacos and burritos. Plus, it'll be better for you with more probiotics.
 
Might have good luck if you can ever find a farmer's market sometime--or telephone your local feed store & ask if they have regulars with dairy cows. Feed stores are farmer hangouts--always have been!

Good luck on your project!
Thanks, I got the local-produced milk and I got some yogurt. Tonight I’ll be making butter; I’ll save the yogurt making for another day when I have more time.
 
The easiest way to make cheese is to scald a gallon of milk (you can use lactaid or goats milk for this). Turn off the stove. Next add 1 cup of vinegar and lightly stir it in. You'll see the curd separate from the whey. Gently dip the spoon in over and over to mix in the vinegar to all parts of the milk until the whey is all yellow, and there is no white milk left, only curds.

Line a colander with a cloth or towel and drain the whey. You can keep it for adding protein to breads and pastries if you like, or throw it in the garden. Press down on the cheese to get a bit of the extra liquid out, but it should still be creamy. Stir salt into it and you can package it in large yogurt tubs. Now you have "farmer cheese".

This is also the same method as making tofu out of soymilk, without the salt. This tofu is called "farmer tofu" and it's good for stir fries or scrambles.

But eat tofu in extreme moderation, as soy isoflavones are not good for you.
 
Thanks, I got the local-produced milk and I got some yogurt. Tonight I’ll be making butter; I’ll save the yogurt making for another day when I have more time.
You can find churns regularly at antique dealers. I find them all the time but I don't buy them because I don't have enough money to be making my own butter when it is fairly cheap at the grocery. A lot of them are not the large wooden ones but small glass ones with a crank at the top and set of reduction gears to speed up a set of wooden dashers. Very simple. Some from the '20s to the '40s have small electric motors as well, the kind that can be repaired with a few drops of oil & a new power cord.
 
The easiest way to make cheese is to scald a gallon of milk (you can use lactaid or goats milk for this). Turn off the stove. Next add 1 cup of vinegar and lightly stir it in. You'll see the curd separate from the whey. Gently dip the spoon in over and over to mix in the vinegar to all parts of the milk until the whey is all yellow, and there is no white milk left, only curds.

Line a colander with a cloth or towel and drain the whey. You can keep it for adding protein to breads and pastries if you like, or throw it in the garden. Press down on the cheese to get a bit of the extra liquid out, but it should still be creamy. Stir salt into it and you can package it in large yogurt tubs. Now you have "farmer cheese".

This is also the same method as making tofu out of soymilk, without the salt. This tofu is called "farmer tofu" and it's good for stir fries or scrambles.

But eat tofu in extreme moderation, as soy isoflavones are not good for you.
Thanks, cheese is one dairy product I really want to make.
 
You can find churns regularly at antique dealers. I find them all the time but I don't buy them because I don't have enough money to be making my own butter when it is fairly cheap at the grocery. A lot of them are not the large wooden ones but small glass ones with a crank at the top and set of reduction gears to speed up a set of wooden dashers. Very simple. Some from the '20s to the '40s have small electric motors as well, the kind that can be repaired with a few drops of oil & a new power cord.
Interesting, last night I spent three hours churning cream with an electric mixer and nothing seemed to result; is it because I was using table cream? (The only cream that was available) Do I have to do it longer? Or is there something else I’m missing?
 
Remember that you'll have to occasionally seek
service for her. (Getting pregnant is necessary for
lactation.)

Surprisingly, I have talked with people who were
unaware that mammals giving milk wasn't a thing
that *just happens* at a certain age.

The most alarming incident was the two female nurses
who were talking to me about buying a goat.

They had both worked on the maternity floor
and one was a mother, herself.

Neither of them had a clue that pregnancy and birth would be
required if they expected the doe to give milk.
 
Made yogurt yesterday, had some of it for breakfast this morning, it turned out great! I took some photos but they haven’t appeared my photo app yet, it was nice and thick!
 
The easiest way to make cheese is to scald a gallon of milk (you can use lactaid or goats milk for this). Turn off the stove. Next add 1 cup of vinegar and lightly stir it in. You'll see the curd separate from the whey. Gently dip the spoon in over and over to mix in the vinegar to all parts of the milk until the whey is all yellow, and there is no white milk left, only curds.

Line a colander with a cloth or towel and drain the whey. You can keep it for adding protein to breads and pastries if you like, or throw it in the garden. Press down on the cheese to get a bit of the extra liquid out, but it should still be creamy. Stir salt into it and you can package it in large yogurt tubs. Now you have "farmer cheese".

This is also the same method as making tofu out of soymilk, without the salt. This tofu is called "farmer tofu" and it's good for stir fries or scrambles.

But eat tofu in extreme moderation, as soy isoflavones are not good for you.
I personally think years of having animal cholesterol is much worse than soya beans ,cows\goats,\sheep breast milk is made for a baby animal ,whose bones muscles, ligaments and organs, haven't formed, not a human who should have human breast milk.
 
The Phytoestrogen in Soy disrupts the endocrine system. Cancer patients are forbidden to consume soy. Remember, menopausal women take soy to replace the estrogen they are no longer producing. Also MTF transwomen take soy to help them grow breasts and bigger hips. In a healthy young woman, it can give heavy periods, and even fibroids or ovarian cysts. It screws up the thyroid. Not to mention it does this to men:

iu
That doesn't prove the stolen breast milk of ungulates is safer
 
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