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Homeschooling Hints

Discussion in 'Parenting & Autism Discussions' started by Yeshuasdaughter, Sep 15, 2021.

  1. Yeshuasdaughter

    Yeshuasdaughter You know, that one lady we met that one time. V.I.P Member

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    With very few breaks, I homeschooled my daughter almost straight through K-12th grades. She, like I, is an Aspie.

    To homeschool, you don't need to follow what the public schools are doing. They're failing anyway. Private schools don't follow public schools, so you don't have to either! Go at your child's pace, and let them choose the subjects they're interested in. I guarantee if you use this method, your child will excel in school.

    I would really recommend against K12 or Connections academy type online schools for autistic children. Their programs are even more inflexible and soul crushing than a regular public school classroom.

    For the early grades, honestly, Dollar Tree or your local grocery store sells workbooks that have everything they need to learn. It's pretty darn sweet.


    For older grades, here are some curriculum companies I bought from. They are Christian based. But we use a ton of Secular education books too.:

    Abeka | Excellence in Education from a Christian Perspective

    http://Milestonebooks.com (This website is really fun. It's all books published by and for Amish and Mennonite schools and homeschoolers. Kids learn about animal husbandry, skid loaders, and silo gases in science class).

    Home - Apologia

    Saxon Math | Rainbow Resource

    I'd look at the books on those websites, and then try to get them used on ebay or amazon.

    Another great resource is Easy Peasy All-in-One Homeschool . It is a full K-12, absolutely free homeschool curriculum, all online, so you don't have to buy any books. You go at your own pace, and can take any class at any grade level. It's so much fun.

    Learn a language for free is a free foreign language site.

    I just cannot stress enough that the secret to homeschool success is following your child's individual interests and grade level for each subject.

    There were a few very unpleasant years where I tried to be a very rigid teacher and go by what I was told children are supposed to be learning at those levels. She rebelled, I yelled, and many of the assignments were unfinished. Also, she was very depressed about being a "bad student".

    Once I opened myself up to the idea that as children grow, it is in their nature to want to learn, everything changed. Where she was below average for some classes, she is now excelling above and beyond.

    Read to your children, both fiction and fact books! Make sure there are many books in your house on all kinds of subjects, from faeries to war machines to bird identification to physics.

    Keep the devices out of the bedrooms! They're only for school and for maybe an hour or two a day of communicating with friends during covid.

    Take field trips. This can be to a library, a park, a museum, or even the grocery store.

    Get creative! Remember what you loved about school when you were a kid. Tear away all the crap that made you dread school, and remember what things in school that excited you.

    For a whole year, study everything about your state, visit courthouses, city hall, the police department, and even the capitol. Kids love that stuff.

    Buy a cheap keyboard and a "teach yourself piano" book.

    ART! Instead of having kids write reports or answer questions all the time, have them illustrate what they learned, and maybe write a small caption or paragraph on the back side. Work with clay!

    If you're learning about Ancient Egypt, carve a sphinx out of a bar of soap, while "King Tut" and "Walk Like an Egyptian" are playing in the background.

    Get them kids outside! They need dirt under their fingernails and slivers in their feet. Trust me on this. Buy them skateboards and shovels and pails. Let them get messy, even in the rain.

    Teach them to cook, work with tools, and to sew. Those are skills that will be passed down for generations.

    Make each day a joy. Who says you have to do a formal school week? We have always taken Mondays off of school. Who wants to do anything on Monday?

    And if the kids are done with their assignments by Noon, that's awesome! Let them be kids for the rest of the day!

    Homeschooling has been the most rewarding work of my life, and I'm so thankful for every moment of it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2021
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  2. Mary Terry

    Mary Terry Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I think what you're describing is similar to the Montessori approach. Let children develop their own interests on their own schedule and always provide the resources for them to learn. There usually has to be some directed focus and discipline, and all kids are different, but children who are actively and happily engaged in learning basically discipline themselves to stay on task.

    Well done!
     
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  3. Aspychata

    Aspychata Serenity waves, beachy vibes

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    Yay. Homeschooling. It was so much fun to watch your child blossom without trying to satisfy some warped standards to get funding for the next school year that public schools must do.

    Science experiments, field trips. We filled out an actual employment application. We balanced a check book. She sewed like crazy. She did so many neat things. Then she went to a performing arts public high school with lots of weird quirky kids just like her. Now she is in college. Thank you homeschooling.
     
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  4. Yeshuasdaughter

    Yeshuasdaughter You know, that one lady we met that one time. V.I.P Member

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    Wow! You were a homeschool mom too?
     
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  5. SimonSays

    SimonSays Time is an illusion I seem to have a lot of V.I.P Member

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    I was a homeschool dad for a while.

    My daughter knew that she didn't have to go to regular school, but when she was nearly 6 she asked if she could try it. We talked about how much more restrictive they would be on the freedom about what to learn and how, but I think she was missing the company of having loads of different kids around. She took to it like a duck to water.

    It meant she got to learn to play the flute, be in a band and perform, and when she was older she got involved in the politics of the school and helped to change some things. Her home education never stopped though, as we still needed to supplement some of the more narrower-minded aspects now and again.

    I'm sure it helped a lot that her secondary school wasn't some huge inner-city underfunded school, just a local state school in West Cornwall that had chosen to specialise in teaching music. The headmaster was a good man. I wish I'd had the opportunity to be in a school like that when I was kid.
     
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  6. ucrenegade

    ucrenegade Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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  7. rach3rd

    rach3rd Active Member

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    I was home schooled back in the late 60's. It was called the Calvert Correspondence back then. I entered public school in 3rd grade.
     
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