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Hi I think I might have autism?

ifeellikeanalien

New Member
Hi I'm a 30 year old woman. I joined this forum. Because I posted on the selective mutism subreddit and someone asked if I've ever been checked for autism. I haven't so I joined this forum..Are there any websites or youtube channels that I can check out to learn about autism? I really want to get a diagnosis. What happens during an autism diagnosis?

In elementary school, middle school, high school, college I never spoke to anyone. I never speak in public. I feel unable to speak but I really want to speak. I have no friends and I've never had any friends. I stopped taking college classes because I was being bullied..

I hope I can make friends on this forum and learn about autism.
 

tree

Blue/Green
Staff member
V.I.P Member
1702135129369.png
 

Judge

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Welcome to the Autism Forums.

If it's any comfort, for all the years I've been in this forum I've seen the same pattern repeat itself over and over and over again. That there's nothing distant or obscure about contemplating whether one is on the spectrum of autism or not. That in nearly every case, people go on to realize that they are autistic, whether through a formal medical diagnosis or not. That in your heart and mind, you know who- and what you are. That it's simply not a trivial question to ask of one's self.

Though this in itself does not mean there is room for self-doubt or denial. Something I went through myself when I accidentally learned of this condition previously known as "Asperger's Syndrome". I had to work at it to get past denial. With logic and persistence winning out to accept who I am.

So "pull up a chair" and don't be afraid to interact with any of us, in pursuit of determining whether or not you are among your own kind. Odds are that you are, and may be amazed at how many traits and behaviors you may have in common with us. Conversely that at the same time we're all individuals too.

I long ago thought that directly interacting with autistic people gave me a much better understanding of my real identity than going through endless medical websites with dry and clinical observations that didn't necessarily match what I was looking for.
 
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ifeellikeanalien

New Member
Welcome to the Autism Forums.

If it's any comfort, for all the years I've been in this forum I've seen the same pattern repeat itself over and over and over again. That there's nothing distant or obscure about contemplating whether one is on the spectrum of autism or not. That in nearly every case, people go on to realize that they are autistic, whether through a formal medical diagnosis or not. That in your heart and mind, you know who- and what you are. That it's simply not a trivial question to ask of one's self.

Though this in itself does not mean there is room for self-doubt or denial. Something I went through myself when I accidentally learned of this condition previously known as "Asperger's Syndrome". I had to work at it to get past denial. With logic and persistence winning out to accept who I am.

So "pull up a chair" and don't be afraid to interact with any of us, in pursuit of determining whether or not you are among your own kind. Odds are that you are, and may be amazed at how many traits and behaviors you may have in common with us.

I long ago thought that directly interacting with autistic people gave me a much better understanding of my real identity than going through endless medical websites with dry and clinical observations that didn't necessarily match what I was looking for.
Hi thank you so much. This is very helpful. And I'm glad that I'm welcome in this community. :)
 

wards

AuADHD
V.I.P Member
Welcome to the forum, here in the UK they use ADOS2 and ADI-R combined to diagnose autism, although there are a few different ones depending on the company you go with.
 

Storm Hess

Permanent Spaceman
Hi. :)

My diagnosis was conducted in the UK over video conference (covid was still prevalent). I had to go private because the waiting list was over 2 years for the NHS. It was expensive, but it's done and over with. Now I know. It was difficult for me to speak during the interview...I'm not a talkative person. They were understanding and allowed me time to collect my thoughts and go through the process.

There are plenty of people here that can help and point you in the proper direction. Welcome. :)
 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
Hi and welcome. For most of us a formal diagnosis isn't anywhere near as important as learning to better understand ourselves and make our own lives a little easier, and talking to people with similar issues is a great way to do that.

Depending on what country you live in getting a formal diagnosis can be a very lengthy and expensive process. For some of us with more profound issues the diagnosis is necessary in order to be able to claim benefits, this was the case for me.
 

Ronald Zeeman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Hi and welcome. For most of us a formal diagnosis isn't anywhere near as important as learning to better understand ourselves and make our own lives a little easier, and talking to people with similar issues is a great way to do that.

Depending on what country you live in getting a formal diagnosis can be a very lengthy and expensive process. For some of us with more profound issues the diagnosis is necessary in order to be able to claim benefits, this was the case for me.
I self-diagnosed in my mid-fifties. opened my eyes, explained a lot.
 

Outdated

I'm from the other end of the spectrum.
V.I.P Member
I self-diagnosed in my mid-fifties. opened my eyes, explained a lot.
Late 40s for me, got diagnosed at age 55 so I could get the pension. What really surprised me when I started learning more is how much I managed to figure out for myself, I did manage to protect myself fairly well even though I didn't really understand why I was behaving in certain ways. My instincts were good.
 

Ken

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
You are absolutely welcome here! Come learn with us.

One thing I would like to point out: being autistic is not a bad thing. No one should ever feel dread at the possibility of being autistic. Being autistic does mean being different, but different is not a bad thing, no matter how often you may be told it is.

Here is a list of other different (autistic) people:
Me :)
Ludwig Van Beethoven
Thomas Edison
Albert Einstein
Henry Ford
Benjamin Franklin
Mark Twain
Robin Williams
Dan Aykroyd
Al Gore
Daryl Hannah
Marie Curie
...That's just a few...

Point is; if you are autistic, then you are in some good company.

Welcome aboard!
 

Ronald Zeeman

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
You are absolutely welcome here! Come learn with us.

One thing I would like to point out: being autistic is not a bad thing. No one should ever feel dread at the possibility of being autistic. Being autistic does mean being different, but different is not a bad thing, no matter how often you may be told it is.

Here is a list of other different (autistic) people:
Me :)
Ludwig Van Beethoven
Thomas Edison
Albert Einstein
Henry Ford
Benjamin Franklin
Mark Twain
Robin Williams
Dan Aykroyd
Al Gore
Daryl Hannah
Marie Curie
...That's just a few...

Point is; if you are autistic, then you are in some good company.

Welcome aboard!
Could easily add another bunch of names.
 

Xinyta

Lost wandering entity
Welcome, @ifeellikeanalien

I'm sure you've been told that what you feel and think isn't unusual. And coming to terms is as much a uphill battle, as the journey you find yourself on to discover your true self and capabilities.

There are plenty of resources on this forum that have been picked out to garentee help for us that deal with ASD.

 

Neri

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Hi:) I'm new here and newly diagnosed at 50 with ASD2. This place has been great. I was like you, a lot, as a kid and teen, but I got into performing arts and had a bunch of children which helped me become a lot more verbally communicative.
I still think I communicate better in written word, the being verbal thing is a work in progress.
I have struggled to get out of my house for quite a few years now. Recently I got tired of being home alone (I have a Aspie guy friend but he works) and I started the process to get help and that involved getting diagnosed (finally).

I hope you find this place as welcoming, helpful and friendly as I have.
 

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