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Duna

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member

Haven't have the time to read it yet but definetely do it because I'm into neuroscience, hehe.
 

Luca

charm & chaos
V.I.P Member
The fact that some of their research was flawed might additionally explain why I also have almost no "stereotypical" autism symptoms and always come up as NT on tests. Interesting. Maybe they will learn not to stereotype us so much lol

My motor skills were always fine growing up but have been impacted by a medical condition in adulthood. I can't run, for example. Only in very short bursts but it will usually make me trip or fall.

I've never had issues with learning information, especially not visually. Only very specifically with math but I have dyscalculia.
 

Stuttermabolur

A psychologist said so
V.I.P Member
The fact that some of their research was flawed might additionally explain why I also have almost no "stereotypical" autism symptoms and always come up as NT on tests. Interesting. Maybe they will learn not to stereotype us so much lol

My motor skills were always fine growing up but have been impacted by a medical condition in adulthood. I can't run, for example. Only in very short bursts but it will usually make me trip or fall.

I've never had issues with learning information, especially not visually. Only very specifically with math but I have dyscalculia.
I completely agree with you. My opinion is that the main distinction between autism and others is the communication style. Everything else is secondary and can be affected by developmental happenstance (dyspraxia) or the environment/culture/experience (introversion, anxiousness). Different mode of communication is something which genuinely seems quite universal among autists. By this I don't mean that I necessarily like everyone who is autistic, but I really feel like I can understand them, or get what they are trying to get across while I often can't for those not on the spectrum. I am including people with more severe autism (even non-verbals) as I really feel like I can also connect with them better than those not with autism.

Like you, I pass very easily as someone not neurodiverse. I'm somewhat extroverted, not as sensitive towards sensory things as most people here (besides texture and touch) and have gotten quite skilled at understanding what people are after, and behaving in a manner people expect. However, I do often misunderstand things unintentionally and feel like people don't really get me, unless they are also on the spectrum. I feel a much closer connection with pretty much everyone on the forum, even people I wouldn't necessarily want to be friends with, than the vast majority of people outside of it.

I wouldn't really have thought I was on the spectrum if two different people who know me well hadn't suggested I was a part of it (mother and ex), and a psychologist specializing in ASD telling me point blank I'm on it, which got me to look more into it (though I haven't been officially diagnosed and don't know if I would be). I also score pretty low on online tests, in the borderline area, though a part of that might be that I diminish or don't notice disregularities.
 

Outdated

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I can't run, for example. Only in very short bursts but it will usually make me trip or fall.
I never could run either. Duck's disease, my arse is too low to the ground. It's also not the sort of energy my body stores. If there was such a thing as a 30 metre sprint I'd win every race. I always had exceptional poise and balance, calisthenics, gymnastics, wrestling, archery, I excelled at these sorts of things.
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member
By this I don't mean that I necessarily like everyone who is autistic, but I really feel like I can understand them, or get what they are trying to get across while I often can't for those not on the spectrum. I am including people with more severe autism (even non-verbals) as I really feel like I can also connect with them better than those not with autism.
I hope this isn’t derailing the thread, but could we talk more about this?

I’m having a hard time accepting this, but I am fully feeling it. Beyond the written format of the forum and the slow pace of talking, which helps me immensely, I am feeling perplexed as to why it feels so easy to speak to people here, and so difficult to do that with others.

It’s that almost universal aspect that you bring up Stuttermabolur, because it just doesn’t seem possible. How is it that with almost every single person on this forum, I can get to the bottom of the story, but it really just feels like a different effing language with everyone else. Can the differences between us really be that stark?

I am feeling what you describe, but I’m having difficulty accepting that it’s true. It feels so binary. Us and them, yet I know it is a continuum and there is much more gray than that.
 

Duna

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
My opinion is that the main distinction between autism and others is the communication style.
What about the way autistic beings process information?
Because I know I do this a lot different than everybody around me (I don't know autistic people outside this forum).
a psychologist specializing in ASD telling me point blank I'm on it,
This happens to me. Up to that point I only knew ASD existed, and had a completely different idea about it. Ignorance.
Beyond the written format of the forum and the slow pace of talking, which helps me immensely, I am feeling perplexed as to why it feels so easy to speak to people here, and so difficult to do that with others.
Besides from being written for my and slower-paced I think these factors add to it being easier:
- It happens that sometimes it's easier to talk to strangers than to people we know.
- It's always a 1:1 thing, even when many people are contributing to a thread. Which is different than a chat where everybody writes at the same time (can't do chats)
- many people here have been where you are and therefore can understand what you are telling. On the other hand you might have been where they are, and can relate to them.
- there is also a certain detachment from mainstream emotions and problems. There is no pressure to be perfect number one when you are or feel like you are different to begin with.
-
 
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Duna

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
My motor skills were always fine growing up but have been impacted by a medical condition in adulthood. I can't run, for example. Only in very short bursts but it will usually make me trip or fall.
Same here. Fine motor skills, good balance, but when I start to run I transform into a clumsy troll.
 

MildredHubble

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
My motor skills are a bit lopsided. I'm a total utter disaster when learning a new process. I'm far more clumsy than everyone else. However, once I get it into my brain, I'm usually much, much quicker with it than others.

Problem is, just change one thing slightly, like the position of something and it's like I've started from scratch. I get rather annoyed if something is changed when I'm used to things being a certain way as it feels like it takes forever to relearn it.

I remember it took until I was 9 years old to figure out how to throw a ball without being laughed at for "throwing like a girl" although I guess that secretly I would have considered that a compliment at the time. :smilecat:
 

MildredHubble

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Why do we always get such a bad rep for being bad throwers? And I’m including you in this group, Mildred H.

And also, @Duna, your explanation up there was super helpful to me, thank you for spelling it out like that.
I don't know quite honestly, as I'm pretty sure there were more than a few girls who could throw better than I could.

I have in the past considered this very question over and over. To be honest I think it has something to do with encouraging boys to engage in physical activities. A lot of girls don't get encouraged to do things like play sports etc. Well at least this was certainly the case when I was young.

I think it gives boys something mundane to be good at. Then they can show off their physical prowess to the girls and also make boys who can't feel emasculated. And on goes the toxic masculinity. What a fun merry go round for everyone. :pensive:
 

MildredHubble

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
When working on a building site NEVER ask me to throw you a hammer!
Yeah, I was once told to throw some heavy objects down into a cupboard during a presentation. The take home from this is, never give me an instruction unless you would like me to take it literally. Particularly if you've been picking fault with everything I do! :smilecat:
 

Forest Cat

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Why do we always get such a bad rep for being bad throwers?

I think it's just about physical strength, it was very common to hear that when I grew up. "Throw like a girl" and "fight like a girl". Boys were supposed to be strong and hard, with more muscle than the girls had. So not really about being bad at throwing, just less strong.
 

Outdated

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I think it's just about physical strength, it was very common to hear that when I grew up. "Throw like a girl" and "fight like a girl". Boys were supposed to be strong and hard, with more muscle than the girls had. So not really about being bad at throwing, just less strong.
I DID have much more muscle, more muscle than most men. I was one fit little bastard.

Still never ask me to throw something to you. It could go anywhere and usually at high velocity.
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member
Boys were supposed to be strong and hard, with more muscle
I feel badly for guys… That’s a lot of pressure. I imagine it must be pretty rough being a dude out there, sometimes. Lots of expectations to get crushed by, just like us gals.
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member
I think the “throw like a girl“ thing confuses me because throwing doesn’t seem like something that requires an inordinate amount of strength. It seems like something more based on precision and accuracy. In terms of comparing brute strength between males and females, sure, I would totally agree to the fact that males are stronger. So, society should just pick a different activity that would make more sense, and more accurately reflect the differences in gendered muscularity.

Of course, I am prone to overthinking things.
 

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