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Found out my psychiatrist diagnosed me with aspergers syndrome

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Erica Griswold, Mar 26, 2020.

  1. Erica Griswold

    Erica Griswold New Member

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    I looked at my dr patient portal and saw she diagnosed me with aspergers back in january but I didn't know. Are the ocd and anxiety (my 2 diagnoses I am aware of) signs of aspergers? I started seeing the psychiatrist because I was hitting myself by accident when I got angry.I also pace when I get either anxious or angry. Is that a meltdown?


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  2. Mia

    Mia Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    People with Asperger's quite often have other difficulties. There are many, OCD being one of them, they tend toward having stress and anxiety related issues as well. Used to hit myself when I was upset, or made a mistake, although I've not done that in many years.
    Pacing is common among people who are anxious or stressed, it's not specific to autism. It's a way of burning off energy or anxiety.

    Meltdowns have more specific indicators, such as memory loss, losing the ability to speak, extreme fatigue afterwards are some of the indicators. But they can also be like tantrums, screaming, shaking, shouting, or hitting their head, depending on the age of the individual and where they are of the spectrum of autism.
     
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  3. Tom

    Tom Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    They call Anxiety and OCD co-morbid conditions. They are very common to people on the spectrum. Though how they are related to autism exactly, I don't believe they know yet.
     
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  4. Sarah S

    Sarah S Well-Known Member

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    Warm wellcome Erica :)

    I was diagnosed with ASD back in 2010 and i dident find that out either until roughly the year i joined here when i finaly read my journals and saw i was diagnosed with all kind of diagnosis even before ASD (the MBD i knew as well as ADHD but the rest hadent a clue to be honest :confused:)
     
  5. onlything

    onlything Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Welcome to the forum Erica :).

    It may be difficult for you to wrap your head around it in the beginning, so don't hesitate to seek help or advice from people here. Everyone is very patient and understanding.

    As others said, autism can have many comorbid conditions but they generally aren't considered traits. However, for example, your tendency to pace when anxious and flapping hands when angry (to the point of hitting yourself) could be considered your stims (self-soothing behaviours). You could also find yourself moving parts of your body rhythmically, tap fingers, rock etc. Any kind of repetitive behaviour you tend to do while agitated or excited may be a stim.
     
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  6. Alexej

    Alexej Well-Known Member

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    Firstly Welcome to the Forums Erica

    I find it quite strange that the Dr did not mention anything to you about this. Finding out this way is a bit off.

    To find out more about meltdown try searching the posts in here. Lots of good info
     
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  7. Erica Griswold

    Erica Griswold New Member

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    what does loosing the ability to speak mean? If I am angry about something and someone asks me a question I either can’t answer or it takes me a few seconds to answer them. I asked my psychiatrist about it, and I think this might be what prompted the diagnosis. I feel like I have to pull my mind out of a hole or something to answer them.
     
  8. Mia

    Mia Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    For me it feels as if my mouth is full of something like peanut butter, its difficult to get the words out. And after a meltdown, it takes quite a while for me to speak. You can speak during that time, but it takes a lot of effort.
     
  9. onlything

    onlything Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    For me, it feels like there is cotton in the part of the brain that I normally access to speak. Not only the idea f hearing myself make a noise feels awful and tiring, but also I can't seem to form any words in any language and may have trouble understanding what other person is saying.
     
  10. Nervous Rex

    Nervous Rex High-functioning autistic V.I.P Member

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    I have often wondered if the anxiety is inherent or if it comes from all the negative social experiences we have growing up "not knowing the rules".
     
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  11. Tom

    Tom Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I don't know. I would say the autistic experience, particularly social difficulties sets us up for some of it. But there is also a lot of OCD and excessive worrying common. That part makes me think there may well be a genetic component at work.
     
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  12. Varzar

    Varzar Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Hi Erica! Welcome to the forums! :)