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Epoxy Daggers, Just Sharing

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member
Picked up a new hobby about a year ago. I enjoy making things out of epoxy, especially these decorative daggers.

1657767646711.jpeg
 

Aspychata

Serenity waves, beachy vibes
V.I.P Member
As usual, l was thinking epoxy dangers, just sharing. So then l jumped to epoxy inhaling in my mind, clicked on this and saw beautiful art work. Very nice. I like them in the cup, l wanted to sketch this composition with the lovely feathers.
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member
As usual, l was thinking epoxy dangers, just sharing. So then l jumped to epoxy inhaling in my mind, clicked on this and saw beautiful art work. Very nice. I like them in the cup, l wanted to sketch this composition with the lovely feathers.
Epoxy Dangers are very real! I feel like I’m going to the moon when I suit up to do resin stuff. Thank you for the kind compliment.
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member

Just in case. :)

Well, I have fantasized about this, but I thought I was nuts (I do have a problem with doubting myself.)

The responses here are very encouraging. These are just a few of my favorites, I have 25 - 30 others.

Is anyone willing to share an approximate figure for what they should sell for? I’ve thought about $25, but sometimes it feels like way too much and sometimes like not enough, so I don’t know.
 

Atrapa Almas

70% INTJ + 30% ASPIE = 100% HUMAN
V.I.P Member
Well, I have fantasized about this, but I thought I was nuts (I do have a problem with doubting myself.)

The responses here are very encouraging. These are just a few of my favorites, I have 25 - 30 others.

Is anyone willing to share an approximate figure for what they should sell for? I’ve thought about $25, but sometimes it feels like way too much and sometimes like not enough, so I don’t know.

Fair prices are usually calculated adding materials prices to a fair salary (hours needed x USD/per hour). That should be your base manufacturing price if you were to hire yourself. Since you are the owner of the company you should earn at least a 30% more.
So: 1.3 * (materials + working salary)

Then if you get too much demand, you increase the price and if you get too low demand you modify your product, offer personalizations, ask customers, etc. That is called a pivot.

Have fun in the journey. :)
 

VictorR

Random Member
V.I.P Member
Well, I have fantasized about this, but I thought I was nuts (I do have a problem with doubting myself.)

The responses here are very encouraging. These are just a few of my favorites, I have 25 - 30 others.

Is anyone willing to share an approximate figure for what they should sell for? I’ve thought about $25, but sometimes it feels like way too much and sometimes like not enough, so I don’t know.

A common mistake of many makers and artisans is to undercut themselves, thinking "it's just a hobby" and so I'm glad you asked the question.

There's a variety of different formulas available. I suggest seeing what they come up with, and that will give you a range to work with.

Another one I like is to blend
A) 3x cost of materials
B) cost of materials + what you consider to be the value of your work to produce an item (e.g. 1.0 hour x $15).

A is a common pricing strategy for items that don't require individual creation (e.g. postcards and stickers that you had made from a drawing you made)

B is basically the baseline, and in @Atrapa Almas' example, is a variation that also builds in a margin.

Having a margin is always good, as that provides you with the reward for selling it - basically, you get earnings for both the creation and for the selling. And you'd want to be able to give a modest discount for multiple purchases, or repeat buyers.

Where you are considering the possibility of consignment, having a higher margin is helpful, since 25-50% commission to the store is quite common, and you want to ensure that you're still getting a fair amount.

The other point I want to cover is shipping. Generally, I'd recommend actual postage+packaging costs and up to $1 more to cover incidentals. People that buy enough online get familiar with costs, and are turned off when a seller has an obviously inflated "shipping and handling."

The packaging is where you get to show some additional creativity - a thank you note or message written on the back of a business card, perhaps an organza bag or other simple but elegant packaging, and maybe some fun stickers with your logo or other art to adorn the envelope with. You want to show your pride in your creation, and for the buyer to get excited when they get it - it's not just another widget that someone got from Amazon in yet another generic brown envelope, but something you lovingly made - for them to enjoy and cherish.
 

Rodafina

Hopefully Human
V.I.P Member
@Atrapa Almas and @VictorR, I don’t know if I can afford the consultancy fees for this great advice! :laughing:

You have given me much to think about, thank you for sharing your thoughts. They are very motivating.
 

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