• Welcome to Autism Forums, a friendly forum to discuss Aspergers Syndrome, Autism, High Functioning Autism and related conditions.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Private Member only forums for more serious discussions that you may wish to not have guests or search engines access to.
    • Your very own blog. Write about anything you like on your own individual blog.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon! Please also check us out @ https://www.twitter.com/aspiescentral

"Eloping"

Sherlock77

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
There is a University here in Canada doing research on what they call "eloping", not in the traditional sense of eloping for marriage, but...

"This project will help us understand Autistic people’s experiences of “eloping” (running away, departing suddenly, going missing, wandering off). We also want to learn what responses from other people (such as teachers, family members, or police) are helpful – and which are not."

My interpretation of that is what I always describe as Cabin Fever, I spend much of my weekend out of the house, just exploring the world really... I can spend hours on my own, driving on the prairies, driving at night just to get home from travels... I do remember my sister calling me one time (I live with her) wondering where I was, I was making my way back but was still five hours away of highway driving

And in the urban context I am most definitely a Flaneur, someone who wanders lots... I have been known on occasion to just hop into my car and go for a drive because I feel like it... And this is something I've done for many years, long before my official diagnosis... I just know lots of people (NT's generally) who will almost never go on an outing on their own, and I'm generally the opposite

I've never really made a connection between this and Autism, if the study approves me I'll get $50 for :cool:, but it might give me some insights too

Can anyone else relate?
 
Yes, l just love driving and exploring. My whole world opened up when l received my first car.
 
Maybe they should just call it "suddenly seeking solitude".

That's the only context that makes any sense to me personally. Usually happening with a shutdown. Where I simply seek to be alone. No more, no less.

Eloping? LOL....not. Though it sounds like something some autistic children might do.
 
Last edited:
"This project will help us understand Autistic people’s experiences of “eloping” (running away, departing suddenly, going missing, wandering off). We also want to learn what responses from other people (such as teachers, family members, or police) are helpful – and which are not."
That seems more aimed at children running away, but I have done this many times as an adult. Not knowing anything about autism or depression, knowing that I'm unhappy and not knowing what to do about it.

The overriding understanding that something Must change.

Full reset. Literally walk out of my life and leave everything behind. Jump on a plane to another city and start again from scratch. I did keep my car once and drove 4000 Km back to Darwin instead of catching a plane. And another time I just walked away in to the tropical rainforests, stayed there for 10 years.

Yes, I relate very well.
 
My ASD kid does this all the time. Not to the degree of other ASD kids who will run away from home and require search teams. But he will dart off for seemingly no reason, or other times hide in places and not respond to our calls.
 
My ASD kid does this all the time. Not to the degree of other ASD kids who will run away from home and require search teams. But he will dart off for seemingly no reason, or other times hide in places and not respond to our calls.
I guess adults do it too, perhaps in different ways, that's what this study is about
 
I guess adults do it too, perhaps in different ways, that's what this study is about
I never considered it a symptom, but I did go off to the library quite a bit in high school. I don't think I ever ate lunch in the cafeteria because I was in the library.
 
Interesting. I have a lot of doubts about the concept. Could you provide a link to the study?

That's stuff that many humans do from time to time. It hardly seems a feature of ASD.
 
That's stuff that many humans do from time to time. It hardly seems a feature of ASD.
If you look on ASD parenting forums, many of them have this problem.

Most children have a "natural" attachment to their parents. Of course, the degree of clinginess can vary from child to child, and all children can be distracted by a shiny object.

But with my ASD kid it's on another level. It is almost like the evolutionary instinct to stay with parents is non-existent.
 
But with my ASD kid it's on another level. It is almost like the evolutionary instinct to stay with parents is non-existent.
That was true for me too. I only actually tried to run away from home once, when I was 5, and I got about a kilometre away before Mum found me, but I used to disappear a lot until Mum started working. Having the house to myself gave me the space I needed.

Here's another of my stories that fits that study's criteria:
 
I guess adults do it too, perhaps in different ways, that's what this study is about
I once knew someone at work who spent the vast majority of his time perpetually traveling. Often to some seriously exotic places. Only to stop at one particular place to work and make enough money to travel again.

Though he did not seem to be the least bit autistic. They laid him off and he was delighted...this time off to the "Golden Triangle". Hope he survived...

Running away? LOL..never an option in my family. It would have meant getting caught and having to serve time in the brig. :oops:
 
I've done this many times Before marriage, Now I tell my wife got the urge see you later. usually visit past haunts. now I take her with.
 
That was true for me too. I only actually tried to run away from home once, when I was 5, and I got about a kilometre away before Mum found me, but I used to disappear a lot until Mum started working. Having the house to myself gave me the space I needed.

Here's another of my stories that fits that study's criteria:
Oh, that is wonderful. In the 1960's I was a latchkey kid. My mother worked, and I transitioned out of daycare by the 4th grade (I was a Little Professor and very self-capable). It was wonderful! Everyone always tells me what a sad thing it is that I was an "only child." Ha! Not as far as I'm concerned. That was the greatest time, having everything to myself all day long in the Summers, and before and after school the other times.
 
That was the greatest time, having everything to myself all day long in the Summers, and before and after school the other times.
For me it was all year round. I have a brother and a sister but they did as they were told and went to school. School days were the only time when I could truly have time to myself and I made good use of it.
 
My mother left when I was 15, and traveled for half the year for the rest of her life. I've made several complete resets after realizing I'd hit a dead end where I'd been trying to build a future. I never go back, and the few personal contacts I keep never ask me to return.
 
Another story, maybe relevant? Back in June 2000 I had been planning a move to Ontario (from Alberta!)... I just felt like I couldn't wait one more day, so two days before some good friends got married I took off anyway and missed their wedding...
 
I got to feeling that way about Victoria, BC, and was planning my exit until I realized I didn't want to be anywhere else I knew of. An NT friend of mine once hitchiked the whole width of Canada twice in three weeks before she realized she should just stop where she was.
 

New Threads

Top Bottom