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Don't want Windows 10? Watch out as MS have changed the update cancel button.

LOL. Sounds familiar.


Be careful what you upgrade. You may be stuck with it.
 
That's why I've pretty much stopped downloading updates unless I know exactly what they're for. I got that annoying little reminder once and vowed it would never happen again. All I update now are virus definitions, security updates, etc. I do it manually, as I don't trust the automatic updates.

How does one do that?
 
Thanks. I got the first part done. I've changed my settings to letting me choose what to download and install. But I assume I won't be needed to check for the update.

It does seem like a bit of a process, but probably for the best.
 
Windows 10 is the best OS they've made since 95.
I suggest people upgrade to it.
 
Yeah, it's a bit of a process, but it keeps MS from slipping something onto your computer. I usually do my updates on Saturday. I'll go to the MS site and see what's available. If there's something questionable, I'll Google the bulletin number. For instance, the Windows 10 "nagware" is usually KB3035583. However, they might be using a different number now, so it's best to be safe and check. If it shows up on the list, just right click and hide it.

I tried doing a search on those bulletin numbers. I only seem to get vague info from MS about it. Can I actually find out anything detailed about them?
 
I suspect a time will eventually come like it did with 98 and XP that they'll stop supporting 7 and we'll have to upgrade. Fortunately, there are enough businesses still committed to 7 that it won't happen overnight.

I think the official date has been around for some time- January 14, 2020.
 
Windows 10 is annoying to use as a CPA doing taxes and accounting. I kept Windows 1998 as long as I could then went Widows 7. As a test I upgraded one of the 7's to 10. It is a little bit faster, but everything has been renamed, moved around, or hidden. I use it for surfing, news, and web development, but never for anything crucial. It's just too hard to modify.
 
Both of my machines are on 8.1, and will remain that way. I used Never10 on both of them, in addition to hiding the KB3035583 update.
 
I've found that if the update doesn't specifically say what it's for, then it's probably not safe to download. MS is bad about saying something about "Update to . . ." but not exactly say what it's for like the security updates or the legitimate ones that fix a specific problem. Ever since I got hit that one time with that annoying "notifier," I don't download any updates unless it specifically states its purpose.

I suspect a time will eventually come like it did with 98 and XP that they'll stop supporting 7 and we'll have to upgrade. Fortunately, there are enough businesses still committed to 7 that it won't happen overnight.

I'm on W8.1. I suppose the updates are different?

Both of my machines are on 8.1, and will remain that way. I used Never10 on both of them, in addition to hiding the KB3035583 update.

Are there any other updates on 8.1 that are unnecessary?
 
Not that I'm aware of, but one major reason I won't go to 10 is the forced automatic updates. As an Aspie, I like being in control.
 
If you are on 8.1, 10 is a major improvement! 10 still has some of the annoying 'metro' split personality as 8.1, but its not nearly as bad. If you can't live without metro, I believe there is a setting to turn it back on.
If you are on 7, 10 is not radically different, and is actually better in some regards. Some people hate 10 and refuse to upgrade, but everyone I've upgraded so far can't see much difference (other than some cosmetic differences).
I remember how much I hated the 3.11 to 95 change, but I wouldn't go back now!
As a bonus, Win 10 actually includes a proper firewall, and a virus scanner. No more bloated Nortons or AVG nagware slowing your computer down, but you can still install your favourites (mine is Eset) if you wish.
If you encrypt, win10 has this built in which saves the issues third party apps have.
 
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I'm just worried not installing updates will lead to viruses on my computer. I just don't have any idea what updates are necessary and why.
 
If you are on 8.1, 10 is a major improvement! 10 still has some of the annoying 'metro' split personality as 8.1, but its not nearly as bad. If you can't live without metro, I believe there is a setting to turn it back on.
If you are on 7, 10 is not radically different, and is actually better in some regards. Some people hate 10 and refuse to upgrade, but everyone I've upgraded so far can't see much difference (other than some cosmetic differences).
I remember how much I hated the 3.11 to 95 change, but I wouldn't go back now!
As a bonus, Win 10 actually includes a proper firewall, and a virus scanner. No more bloated Nortons or AVG nagware slowing your computer down, but you can still install your favourites (mine is Eset) if you wish.
If you encrypt, win10 has this built in which saves the issues third party apps have.

8.1 has Windows Defender which is all I use. Never had any virus issues at all. Also, I have the ClassicShell extension installed on both of my computers. It's like I never left 7.
 
8.1 has Windows Defender which is all I use. Never had any virus issues at all. Also, I have the ClassicShell extension installed on both of my computers. It's like I never left 7.

You might want to Google about Windows Defender. You won't like what you see. It's a relatively anemic anti-spyware program compared to other more robust freeware products like Avast or AVG. Or anti-virus products at cost like Trend Micro or Kaspersky Labs.

If you do get a primary antivirus program, be sure to turn Windows Defender off. You can still run it manually for individual scans, but just don't run it in resident memory where it may cause false positives for your primary antivirus application.
 
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On the topic of AV, many people rave about Kaspersky. In my personal experience, shops with Kaspersky scan my thumbdrive, and find nothing. I take it home, and NOD32 tells me they have given me a virus.
Here's why I love Eset products:
www.eset.com/kh/home/whyeset/compare/
 
I've always found any other anti-virus software other than Windows Defender/Microsoft Security Essentials would bog my system down. On my DAW computer, I can't have anything outside of Defender running in the background as the recording software needs as much power as it can get. Again, I haven't had any issues with Defender. Others might have, but to each his own.
 
I've always found any other anti-virus software other than Windows Defender/Microsoft Security Essentials would bog my system down. On my DAW computer, I can't have anything outside of Defender running in the background as the recording software needs as much power as it can get. Again, I haven't had any issues with Defender. Others might have, but to each his own.

Any robust anti-virus program running in resident memory is going to tax system resources. Worse if you have applications requiring things like Microsoft.Net. Just understand that if Defender can't identify a specific type of malware or spyware, that doesn't inherently mean your system hasn't been compromised or your identity stolen. It just means Defender didn't catch it. It's a relatively weak program for what it does.

The only work-around I've ever had over such dynamics is quite basic. To have removable hard drives. Where you can dedicate one drive with an operating system offline without anything to tax system resources for optimal software performance. And to have another drive and OS with adequate security for online use. All that slide in an out from your computer's case with relative ease. The beauty of it all being that you can reload a single proprietary OS like Windows over and over on different drives.
 
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