• Welcome to Autism Forums, a friendly forum to discuss Aspergers Syndrome, Autism, High Functioning Autism and related conditions.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Private Member only forums for more serious discussions that you may wish to not have guests or search engines access to.
    • Your very own blog. Write about anything you like on your own individual blog.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon! Please also check us out @ https://www.twitter.com/aspiescentral

Dog Lovers: Do you love a breed which is not for everyone?

Do you think your favorite dog breed needs a special type of owner?

  • The dogs of my breed of choice are great, but they're not for everyone

    Votes: 11 61.1%
  • The dogs of my favorite breed are great for everyone. No one could go wrong by choosing them

    Votes: 3 16.7%
  • I don't know

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I don't have a favorite dog breed

    Votes: 3 16.7%
  • I prefer (insert other animal species of choice)

    Votes: 1 5.6%

  • Total voters
    18

Ste11aeres

Well-Known Member
http://www.realpitbull.com/notforeveryone.html
Taken from the website linked above:
Studying breed trends over the course of the 20th century, there is a clear
pattern that shows popularity for any breed is extremely detrimental.
Popularity manifests itself in a variety of problematic ways: over-breeding
without regard to health or temperament; dogs sold to whoever forks
over the money regardless of their suitability as owners; and lots of
people without a real understanding of their breed of choice creating
problem dogs that generate a negative effect that spills over to the public
(by way of attacks); and lots of dogs ending up in shelters.

Popularity for Pit Bulls has been and will continue to be disastrous. A
breed that should only be in the hands of but a few is now in the ends of,
well, everyone. Many people who make decent dog owners make really
bad Pit Bull owners. And there are lots of decent dog owners out there.

But just because not everyone should own a Pit Bull doesn’t mean no one
should. This is a strong point that can be validated many ways, but two
extremes that do not necessarily agree with this point are waging war
right now and a win on either side will mean a loss for the American Pit
Bull Terrier breed.

There are two ends of a broad spectrum: both are extreme, and both
could ultimately spell disaster for the breed. One end believes no one
should own Pit Bulls and the world would be a better place without them.
This camp is working to destroy the breed through fear tactics, half truths,
and lies. The other end of the spectrum believes Pit Bulls potentially
belong in any dog-loving home, and can and should be in the public eye
represented as the perfect breed of dog for lots and lots of people. This
latter line of thinking seems to permeate large segments of the pro Pit Bull
faction lately. This is a huge concern, as well-meaning people push the
breed into the spotlight, declaring them, "the same as any other dog",
and the perfect play pal for kids, teens, dogs, cats, horses, hamsters,
whatever.

One tell tale sign of this latter segment - let’s call them the Pollyanna Pit
Bull Brigade - is their pushing of the notion that Pit Bulls are the same as
all other breeds, no more and no less prone to aggression - any sort of
aggression - than any other breed. This is too general a sentiment to
even warrant being taken seriously, but it is doing damage nonetheless.
Suffice it to say, if all breeds were the same, we would not have breeds,
we’d just have dogs. Any dog could be trained to do any task to extreme
efficiency. Shetland Sheepdogs could be trained in attack police work to
perform like German Shepherds, and Siberian Huskies could be trained to
herd sheep like either of the aforementioned herding breeds.

Pit Bulls are gluttons for human attention, love bugs supreme, and the
real representatives of the breed don’t have an ounce of human-
aggression in their blood. It is insulting to any self-respecting bulldog fan
that anyone would suggest Pit Bulls are no more and no less prone to
human-aggression than any other breed. The breed should be rock solid
and never show signs of unwarranted human aggression. In fact, the
breed is so human-friendly that even sometimes when you wish they’d
show some aggression (i.e. someone breaking into your home), you
shouldn’t bet the bank that they’d do more than wag their butts and
scramble to give a kiss on the lips. They aren’t guard dogs! (If you want a
guard dog, get, hmmm, maybe a Rottweiler, or a Cane Corso - breeds
bred for the task!)

Conversely, because of their history, Pit Bulls may be more prone to
showing aggression directed at other dogs than say, a Beagle which is a
breed bred to run in packs with - not fight - other dogs.

What’s so difficult to wrap your head around, here? Still, many folk want to
insist "Pit Bulls are just like any other dogs". You wouldn’t insult the
German Shepherd folk, or the Siberian Husky folk, or the Rhodesian
Ridgeback folk by insisting that their breeds are "just like any other
breed". Besides, it’s just not true.

Pit Bulls like all breeds are prone to their own breed-specific traits,
idiosyncrasies of temperament, and likely to demonstrate certain
behavioral tendencies. There ARE genetics involved in the manifestation of
behavior, after all, an inextricable intertwining of nature vs nurture so that
two breeds of different genetic makeup raised in the same environment
will show different temperaments and behaviors. The same environment
acting upon two unique beings made up of different genes. Environment is
important. Unbelievably so. But without genetics, there would be no
behavior to mold to begin with.

Since breeds are unique, just like people, it is a simple leap of logic to the
mindset that says, "Not all breeds are suited to all people". When people
who are mentally, personality-wise, environmentally, financially,
educationally unsuited to a breed but obtain said breed with false notions
of what that breed is all about, the end result can be truly disastrous.

When lots of people, as in the case of the Pit Bull, own a breed but are
not necessarily properly suited for it, you have lots of problems, all over
the place. Welcome to the Current Era and the Pit Bull Problem as we
know it.

And here we are back to that Pollyanna Pit Bull Brigade that pushes
popularity of the breed and insists Pit Bulls are just like any other dog -
what breed IS 'just like any other dog???' The answer? None. This line of
thinking when propagated creates for situations in which inexperienced, ill-
prepared dog owners end up with Pit Bulls they cannot manage.

The answer to the problem is simple: stop pushing Pit Bulls on the general
public. Stop promoting them as "just like any other dog". Pit Bulls need to
become LESS popular, not more. The breed is already too popular. That’s
its problem. And until we find a way to drastically reduce numbers and
shout from the rooftops what the Pit Bull IS and IS NOT, we’ll continue to
see the downward spiral of one of the most magnificent creatures to ever
live: that goofy silly special talented loving breed we call the America PIT
BULL Terrier.
 
I have to say yes. No dog breed that exists is for everyone. Pets are not for everyone. I know a lot of people who treat their animals like furniture or burglar alarms and that is just cruel. Every dog needs love and attention and exercise, and not everyone is able or even willing to provide that. So no, not for everyone.
 
Yes, I own and love wolfdogs and they are definitely a breed that isn't for everyone. You can't train or interact with them like you can with say a Labrador or poodle, or any 100% domestic dog. They are large, high energy, very intelligent animals with powerful jaws and a stronger prey drive than most dogs. They are wary of anything new be that items, foods, other animals or, people.

They dig and climb very well and generally do not get alone well with dogs. mine were raised with a cat and, they play and get along fine with that cat but, if any other cat gets into their enclosure while they are in it, they will kill the cat. One cat does not mean all cats to them. Same as one dog does not mean all dogs to them, they may be fine with one lab and, attack the next lab they meet.

Definitely not a dog for everyone.
 
They say we don't always get the dogs we want.... sometimes we get the dogs we need. ;)

Meet my spiritual teacher:
Grimm is a German shepherd dog, but he is Czech bloodlines. This means he is extremely dominant, intense, rank-aware, powerful, has tremendous initiative & determination.

"Rankness" is common in Czech-bloodline dogs. Rankness is the tendency to come right up the leash and nail the handler, if the dog thinks his/her corrections are too soft.

My nature is gentle-tempered, but I had to endure a sea-change to get in touch with my inner alpha. It was a significant personality transplant. Grimm was worth it.

We love eachother, snuggle, play, and share warmth and affection today. It's been challenging, but we've worked it out, and my life is incredibly blessed!

Here's my intense, loving, strong-minded goofy sweetie:

(Please pardon so many pics... he is the love of my life! )









For most who want casual pet ownership, this type of workingline Czech dog isn't the best option. But my heart is beyond overflowing with love for Grimm, and he has taught me more life lessons than any other dog I've ever had. LOVE my Grimm!
 

Attachments

  • upload_2015-8-1_19-58-14.jpeg
    upload_2015-8-1_19-58-14.jpeg
    12.6 KB · Views: 230
Last edited:
My favorite breeds are all Molossers: Anatolian/Danish/Tibetan Mastiffs, Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs, Great Pyrenees, Landseer Newfoundlands and Leonbergers. I've never owned any of them for lack of space.

Some of these are good with people and other pets but some aren't. Many are one-person dogs, and all are relatively short-lived and expensive to own. None of them are a great choice for a 5' tall woman.

I don't think people should buy dogs they can't afford, handle well or provide adequate room for. Having a strong partner helps, and it might make me consider one of these breeds if a house with a big backyard and a pile of money happens to magically appear.

Warmheart, man, your dog is gorgeous. I love it that he's your avatar -- Grimm is perhaps the best-looking guy I've ever seen! :D
 
I'll always have a place in my heart for any Yorkshire Terrier. If you lose your Yorkie, always look down first. Most likely they're right there at your feet. :)

But if you have small children, you might want to pass on this particular toy breed.

RIP: Susie, Puddin, Albert, Vickie and Sydney.

mooks_zps4abb39a5.jpg
 
They say we don't always get the dogs we want.... sometimes we get the dogs we need. ;)

Meet my spiritual teacher:
Grimm is a German shepherd dog, but he is Czech bloodlines. This means he is extremely dominant, intense, rank-aware, powerful, has tremendous initiative & determination.

"Rankness" is common in Czech-bloodline dogs. Rankness is the tendency to come right up the leash and nail the handler, if the dog thinks his/her corrections are too soft.

My nature is gentle-tempered, but I had to endure a sea-change to get in touch with my inner alpha. It was a significant personality transplant. Grimm was worth it.

We love eachother, snuggle, play, and share warmth and affection today. It's been tough, but we've worked it out, and my life is incredibly blessed!

Here's my intense, loving, strong-minded goofy sweetie:

(Please pardon so many pics... he is the love of my life! )









For most who want casual pet ownership, this type of workingline Czech dog isn't the best option. But my heart is beyond overflowing with love for Grimm, and he has taught me more life lessons than any other dog I've ever had. LOVE my Grimm!
He is very cute.
 
Yeah, I like Chihuahuas. But lots of people don't. The shelters are full of them and Pits.

They actually breed these two as a mix. They are called Chipits. They apparently end as short, energetic and muscular 30lbers. They do best with a firm owner that stresses social training. The funny part is they think they are lap dogs and are very affectionate with owners.
 
Oh we have beagles 2 of them and although there a very popular breed there also a very abandoned breed. People get a beagle because there cute and love people. Little do they know there also food addicted little turds who have no concept of off leash. Our older beagle is hunting stock we got as a puppy he has managed to kill a couple families of mice and 3 rabbits well we were walking him. He's also had to have surgery twice for eating things he shouldn't. He's been to the puppy neurosurgeon once because beagles are prone to seizures and just wandered off (usually ending up in some unknowing neighbours house looking for food) numerous times. He's also one of my best friends he's a dog with aspergers doesn't like affection, and his special interest is food we are the perfect match. The other beagle is new to our family a retired show dog who was used for breeding stock she's dumb as a bag of hammers but will love you to death if you pet her.
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1438487109.485878.jpg
thats both of them.
 
No, I don't have a favorite breed. Our dog is a rescue mutt, German shorthair Border collie mix and he's a handful. We sometimes go out of town and are unable to take him with, we've burned all our friends and relatives as dog sitters, and have had to use professionals the last two times. Under the care of a good dog handler, he's very obedient, anyone else and he's a barrel of monkeys.

Here we are ski-joring, he loves to run fast, but needs directions.

IMG_0717.JPG
 
They say we don't always get the dogs we want.... sometimes we get the dogs we need. ;)

Meet my spiritual teacher:
Grimm is a German shepherd dog, but he is Czech bloodlines. This means he is extremely dominant, intense, rank-aware, powerful, has tremendous initiative & determination.

"Rankness" is common in Czech-bloodline dogs. Rankness is the tendency to come right up the leash and nail the handler, if the dog thinks his/her corrections are too soft.

My nature is gentle-tempered, but I had to endure a sea-change to get in touch with my inner alpha. It was a significant personality transplant. Grimm was worth it.

We love eachother, snuggle, play, and share warmth and affection today. It's been tough, but we've worked it out, and my life is incredibly blessed!

Here's my intense, loving, strong-minded goofy sweetie:

(Please pardon so many pics... he is the love of my life! )









For most who want casual pet ownership, this type of workingline Czech dog isn't the best option. But my heart is beyond overflowing with love for Grimm, and he has taught me more life lessons than any other dog I've ever had. LOVE my Grimm!
He looks like alovely dog that has had great breeding. A lot of Alsations these days have genetic problems due to bad breeding which is really sad.
 
I do have a favourite breed of dog, though I don't own one myself. My favourite breed is the Akita. My parents always had Akitas as family pets. They aren't for everyone because they aren't very affectionate and aloof in nature. They tend to want to do their own thing, but at the same time they're very loyal. I would even go so far as to say that they are the Aspies of the dog world :)
 
Labrador dogs tick all the boxes for me mostly because they generally have steady temperaments & are friendly & inquisitive & intelligent although they don't have an "Off" switch for eating so that needs careful management. I find their faces kind & their hind legs when walking, hilarious. They are very benign to their household & those associated but will act territorially protective to unknowns. The fact that they are used in Guiding situations for people with epilepsy, as an early warning device & to resuscitate, post-fit (they lick their owners face until their name is repeated three times to indicate consciousness & lucidity in the owner-patient) elevates their awesomeness & where I live, there is an elderly re-homed black 'Lab living adjacent who I can regularly say hello to. I would like my own I sometimes think but it's an awareness of the overwhelming responsibility that comes with that :)
 
When I was a kid I used to have a Border Collie/Australian Cattle Dog mix. She was the best type of dog for me because she was very patient and loyal, and (surprisingly) not too high energy. She was also pretty independent, kind of like a cat, which is probably why she was the best dog for me - normally I am a cat person through and through.

The only thing that was not good about my dog was that we had to put her to sleep because of an unknown disease that had ravaged her back legs and made her unable to walk. She was in a lot of pain. (Apparently it must be a genetic thing, as the exact same thing happened to another border collie owner who lives nearby).
 
although they don't have an "Off" switch for eating so that needs careful management.
I have noticed that one sees a lot of fat labradors. Maybe my dog needs to hang out with a few of them in the hopes that that trait will rub off on him. He's as picky as an Aspie in regards to food. Don't judge me if some of his pictures show his ribs...



I've certainly enjoyed these posts, everybody. In fact, some of what you've written makes my dog seem almost easy. ;) Almost.
Correction: He is easy, as long as I do everything correctly and am consistent about it.
Finn%20looking%20up_zpsdo7abj5d.jpg
 
Labrador dogs tick all the boxes for me mostly because they generally have steady temperaments & are friendly & inquisitive & intelligent although they don't have an "Off" switch for eating so that needs careful management. I find their faces kind & their hind legs when walking, hilarious. They are very benign to their household & those associated but will act territorially protective to unknowns. The fact that they are used in Guiding situations for people with epilepsy, as an early warning device & to resuscitate, post-fit (they lick their owners face until their name is repeated three times to indicate consciousness & lucidity in the owner-patient) elevates their awesomeness & where I live, there is an elderly re-homed black 'Lab living adjacent who I can regularly say hello to. I would like my own I sometimes think but it's an awareness of the overwhelming responsibility that comes with that :)
I have found that every Lab I have met, every single one since getting my dog, has been aggressive towards my dog. I'm sure if I met some when by myself, that I would have a better experience. Is dog-directed aggression common among Labradors?
 
I like shepherding dogs. Australian shepherds, blue heelers, border collies. They are not for everybody since they tend to be high energy and highly intelligent for a dog. Our Australian shepherd was never properly trained, so he got his exercise/entertainment by trotting the chickens in and out of their pens a lot and then tearing off after the goats when they'd get out of their pen. He loved it. Drove the chickens nuts. We appreciated the help with the goats.
 
I have found that every Lab I have met, every single one since getting my dog, has been aggressive towards my dog. I'm sure if I met some when by myself, that I would have a better experience. Is dog-directed aggression common among Labradors?


In my time as a personal lines insurance underwriter, our company logged more dogbite claims involving Labrador Retrievers than any other breed that I can recall. However we never made any individual decisions regarding dog breeds themselves.

While the Insurance Information Institute (IIA) tracks these statistics quite closely, they also recognize the diversity of policy among both insurers and various states regarding dog breeds themselves. Yet I think it's also important to note that the IIA itself has not taken any specific stand towards any specific breed. Which may say a lot given the collective exposure to all insurers in general.

You also have to factor in litigation itself, separate from whatever exposure a pet can have. Clearly lawsuits are more prevalent in certain states more so than others. While there remains unjustified hysteria towards certain breeds, and the number of incidents remains steady, the average cost per claim by insurers is steadily increasing. Even then though, this may reflect one thing more than anything else- the increased cost of medical care and litigation potential.

I do know from my former employer's own claims that the "fear factor" can enhance most any settlement. Anything where trauma can be substantiated regardless of tissue damage essentially can "up the ante" of a dogbite claim.

"Some insurance companies will not insure homeowners who own certain breeds of dogs categorized as dangerous, such as pit bulls. Others decide on a case-by-case basis, depending on whether an individual dog, regardless of its breed has been deemed vicious."

http://www.iii.org/issue-update/dog-bite-liability
 
Top Bottom