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Featured confusion about swearing

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by Aspergers_Aspie, Jan 12, 2021.

  1. Aspergers_Aspie

    Aspergers_Aspie Well-Known Member

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    The autism charity I'm registered with (which had drop-ins before
    covid) have a facebook group, different members of staff post information on it and from time to time ask how everyone is doing, a service user replied with a swear word in his message, I'm confused why that's allowed but, on occasion swearing during the drop-in a service user would be asked not to.
     
  2. tree

    tree Blue/Green Staff Member V.I.P Member

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    Ask them to explain.
     
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  3. Aspergers_Aspie

    Aspergers_Aspie Well-Known Member

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    Good idea, thanks.
     
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  4. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    Is this a local or national charity open to everyone in the UK? Expecting some not to swear may be a bridge too far ya know. Then again it could just be a melter faffin' around. ;)
     
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  5. Aspergers_Aspie

    Aspergers_Aspie Well-Known Member

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    It's within a city in the UK. The manager said it depends on context but I'm 90 percent sure the movie group wouldn't see an 18 movie at the cinema
     
  6. UberScout

    UberScout Are you there, God? ...Hello? V.I.P Member

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    [BLEEP]ing groups with these [BLEEP] [BLEEP] rules.
     
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  7. Neonatal RRT

    Neonatal RRT Well-Known Member

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  8. Aspergers_Aspie

    Aspergers_Aspie Well-Known Member

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  9. tree

    tree Blue/Green Staff Member V.I.P Member

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    It's overstating the case to say that "swearing is actually a sign of more intelligence."
    What the researcher said, in the video, was that people who have large vocabularies
    over all typically also have large "swearing" vocabularies. It's not like the mere fact
    of cussing/cursing/swearing/vulgarity indicates intelligence. It's the idea of knowing
    and using words, in general.
     
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  10. Gracey

    Gracey Well-Known Member

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    I suspect what's 'normal' for the environment may influence the use of swearing here.

    Groups of factory, warehouse, distribution hub workers, building site labourers & dockers, for example,
    might swear more amongst their work colleagues
    but less at home amongst family, at church, at the bank, supermarket or on the school run/parents evening.

    I believe that in itself displays some intelligence.
    (Adapting to the environment.)


    Some young adults may swear more amongst their peers in a school setting but wouldn't use the same language at home to their parents or siblings.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2021
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  11. Aspergers_Aspie

    Aspergers_Aspie Well-Known Member

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    After thinking more, I change my mind.
     
  12. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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  13. Aspergers_Aspie

    Aspergers_Aspie Well-Known Member

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    Maybe swearing can be mistaken for agression?
     
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  14. Aspergers_Aspie

    Aspergers_Aspie Well-Known Member

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    Something similar may be, a fellow aspie, said to me, he would take his family to a soccer match as he wouldn't want to or doesn't believe in shielding his family from the experience. (We said that we heard rugby matches can have a more family friendly atmosphere than soccer matches)
     
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  15. Gracey

    Gracey Well-Known Member

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    One could 'shield' and protect people from hearing profanity,

    In my own case I explained to my children; who copied language heard outside of our home,
    the consequences of choosing to use that sort of language in general.

    In general, it's offensive and upsetting and there were an infinite number of alternative words could be used instead.
    I couldn't protect or shield them forever.
    As they made their own way in the big wide world they would certainly hear more and more.

    I couldn't stop other people swearing but I could explain the consequences of such and set some alternative examples for my own to follow.
    The earlier, the better.
    I think as pre school children right and wrong can be mostly black and white.

    So when once sitting on a bus years ago when my youngest was a preschooler
    and hearing her sharp intake of breath then exclaiming "That man just said a naughty word!"...
    ... as if it was the most terrible thing she'd ever witnessed,
    it served as evidence she understood about swearing being wrong.
    (within the norms of our family)

    She has her own family now and I imagine the same views she has about swearing will be passed on to her own.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2021
  16. Gracey

    Gracey Well-Known Member

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    In my humble opinion swearing could be used to emphasise an opinion.
    Given that aggression is emotive, the aggressor may well use certain words to demonstrate feelings.

    I'm also led to believe, on a deeper level, mouth shaping can be a factor in displays of aggression.
    Certain words need certain shaping of the mouth to be succinct.

    The 'eff word' requires initial baring of the teeth.
    (in a similar way a dog might draw back it's flews and bare it's teeth signalling aggression)

    Perhaps in that respect I might consider the eff word more aggressive than other swear words.
     
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  17. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    Quite possibly. After all, we're talking about English. A language that is pretty much void of any "flavoring particles". Something I became aware of in learning another language. So the next best thing may be the use of expletives.

    It is kind of funny to see Americans who are sometimes taken back by how easily the Irish may swear in an everyday conversation. That it may be somewhat culturally misunderstood. The reality is that more often than not some people are likely to say such things only to emphasize something, with no aggression or malice intended.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2021
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