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Battle Plans for achieving Autism Acceptance.

Greatshield17

An Appeal to Heaven!
V.I.P Member
As my status stated, I'm in a bit of a bad mood today, I kind of wanted to post this when I'm not in a bad mood, but maybe this will help me feel better; I thought I would post my simple battle plan, (which I've mentioned in part in past posts on here) of how to achieve Autism Acceptance, and share it in-full here, as well have you all share your ideas and plans.

My plan for achieving Autism Acceptance is as follows:

1. Form in-the-flesh communities: get together in neighborhoods and the like where we're close to each other, we don't have visit each other everyday, agree with everything we think or believe or the like, we just need to be there for each other and be a visible presence to the larger community.
2. Be fruitful and multiply: I think this is the most important thing we can do to advance the cause of Autism Acceptance, it shows to the non-Autistic community that we're a self-sustaining people.
3. Be open about being Autistic: Perhaps a challenging but nonetheless important part in our push for Autism Acceptance.
4. Be involved in the local community to some degree: Probably the most difficult of the efforts, we need to find some way to show that we're a positive presence in the community.
5. Apply self-advocacy when necessary: Of course there will be times when need to speak up, but I think we should put more effort into the above first so that we have a lot ground to stand on when we do need to speak up.

So that's my plan, some of us may not be able to do all of these but we should at least do some. (My heavy emphasis is on No. 2, but again, not all of us will be able to do that.) What are your plans and ideas for pushing Autism Acceptance?
 

Neonatal RRT

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I would start with small public service announcements and education highlighting folks on the spectrum doing things that,...ignorantly,...they didn't think autistics could do. I think people have some understanding,...and unfortunately, some stereotypes built up around what they have seen regarding small children. What they don't understand is that children grow up,...and they don't behave like that anymore. They need to understand their adult neighbor, their co-worker, their friend, their spouse may also be on the spectrum and not recognize it for what it is.

I have found that the public takes in information slowly,...spoon feed them. If it comes off as a "movement" with Twitter hashtags and all that,...some people are immediately going to put up their "walls" and then no matter what is said, they are going to be against it, or at the very least put up some intellectual resistance. Some people are really resistant to new ideas,...so sometimes you have to slip the information into their brain passively without them recognizing that they are actually learning something,...LOL! Welcome to education 101.
 

Tom

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Battle plans? I love battle plans!!!

But if you want good ones there is probably no better place to look then old Napoleon. Well, make that old dead Napoleon. He of course lost some big ones cough, cough, Waterloo. ;D But statistically he has the best record.

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There are varying numbers depending on who does the counting and what is counted, but all agree in the conclusion.

"Napoleon actually fought in 78 military engagements and commanded in 76 of them, to include battles, clashes, skirmishes, sieges etc. He won 64 of those and lost 12, giving a win rate of 84%. Of purely pitched battles, he fought 67, won 57 and lost 10, giving a win rate of 85%."

Anyway, supposedly his favorite (though he often departed from it in later years) was the 'Maneuver sur la derriere'.

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I do not know how to make it work in your context, but I do believe you will need an army.

I will join if you make me Supreme Generalissimo in charge of donut rations.

trays-of-donuts.png


;)
 

Silhouette Mirage

S̷͕̲̔Ḷ̸̽̌İ̶̞M̸̲͆Ë̶̗̠
V.I.P Member
Even though it's hard, I've been doing #3 a lot more in my life lately. I know it makes things awkward for everyone else (if they're the non-accepting type), but if I'm meeting someone for the first time I just lay it out so they don't have to keep guessing about quirks and communication issues. If they want to make it weird, it's on them, because it doesn't really change my reality whatsoever.

What I've come to find is that I can make myself more comfortable this way, which originally I would've deemed selfish, but if it leads to better relationships... I guess a little bit of selfishness isn't a bad thing. It's also a bit humbling, which IMO kind of cleanses the ego and lets others know you don't care if they think you're subhuman or whatever.

Great thread, by the way. I'm a sucker for this optimistic stuff. :)
 
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Greatshield17

An Appeal to Heaven!
V.I.P Member
I would start with small public service announcements and education highlighting folks on the spectrum doing things that,...ignorantly,...they didn't think autistics could do. I think people have some understanding,...and unfortunately, some stereotypes built up around what they have seen regarding small children. What they don't understand is that children grow up,...and they don't behave like that anymore. They need to understand their adult neighbor, their co-worker, their friend, their spouse may also be on the spectrum and not recognize it for what it is.

I have found that the public takes in information slowly,...spoon feed them. If it comes off as a "movement" with Twitter hashtags and all that,...some people are immediately going to put up their "walls" and then no matter what is said, they are going to be against it, or at the very least put up some intellectual resistance. Some people are really resistant to new ideas,...so sometimes you have to slip the information into their brain passively without them recognizing that they are actually learning something,...LOL! Welcome to education 101.
Good thoughts, perhaps we could some way to invest-in and make small PSAs, no YouTube ads or the like though, those things really get on my nerves.
 

Fino

Alex
V.I.P Member
I'm not just trying to be contrary, but I will almost certainly never do any of those. Good luck though!
 

Aspychata

Serenity waves, beachy vibes
V.I.P Member
There is starting to be more acceptance. It's coming in small batches. It's not so dreaded as it once was. The younger generation seems a little more open to information. Think general acceptance of everybody is important. The more we call out mistreatment of minorities, we are on the correct path.
 

Suzanne

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Coming here and reading such posts as yours, makes me see that I happen to be very blessed with my faith, because they are so good to me.

I am studying the bible with a lovely lady ( she is the studient) and she witnesses me being me, but just takes it in her stride, because her second daughter has ADHD and there are similarites.

I think in an ideal situation, having all those of the autism spectrum is great; but the reality is quite different. We are still human beings and thus, will get on each other's nerves lol

Just watched a fantastic Korean drama based on a young woman who has aspergers and is a lawyer, which is the first time, in Korea and it has become viral; the ratings is the best out of all other dramas and is bringing many out to say they are on the autism spectrum and ones who say that it helps them to communicate better with those on the autism spectrum.
 

Greatshield17

An Appeal to Heaven!
V.I.P Member
Even though it's hard, I've been doing #3 a lot more in my life lately. I know it makes things awkward for everyone else (if they're the non-accepting type), but if I'm meeting someone for the first time I just lay it out so they don't have to keep guessing about quirks and communication issues. If they want to make it weird, it's on them, because it doesn't really change my reality whatsoever.

What I've come to find is that I can make myself more comfortable this way, which originally I would've deemed selfish, but if it leads to better relationships... I guess a little bit of selfishness isn't a bad thing. It's also a bit humbling, which IMO kind of cleanses the ego and lets others know you don't care if they think you're subhuman or whatever.

Great thread, by the way. I'm a sucker for this optimistic stuff. :)
I need to be out and open about being Level-1 Autistic when I move to Chile.
 

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