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Featured Banning videos of autistic children having meltdowns through social media

Discussion in 'Politics Discussion' started by Aspie_With_Attitude, Oct 22, 2020.

  1. Aspie_With_Attitude

    Aspie_With_Attitude Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I had recently uploaded a video discussing why there should be bans on parents who are raising autistic children to film them having meltdowns then to be shared on social media. I feel that it takes away their privacy and also attracts the wrong attention towards ablest cowards who think these overwhelming situations are actually funny when they're not.



    I had also made like an Instagram poster for those who are over sensitive seeing my special effects in my video contents. Since I love animating, this would be very hard for me to back down from this.

    [​IMG]

    I also did have some opinions telling me that some parents need to film their autistic children having their meltdowns as evidence to share with the doctor or any specialist. Usually this is always is kept private and confidential, this would be just like giving urine samples to doctors kind of thing.
     
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  2. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately what you are asserting for the US does not likely constitute personal injury of a parent towards their child. Not to mention that a minor cannot file a personal injury lawsuit against their parents.

    Under such circumstances I'd think establishing abuse and malicious intent of a parent would be legally difficult. And sadly I suspect there are no family law precedents where a judge remanded parental custody to another party solely over their uploaded public videos of their autistic children.

    In essence I'd think the best pleas to stop such practices fall on legislators rather than parents or directors and officers of social media. Though I would think to change existing family and tort laws apart from any potential constitutional implications would make it quite an uphill legal battle.

    Most of this all comes down to parental care, custody and control of their children. Where the state isn't necessarily going to be so aggressive in altering this equation short of establishing a formal accusation of abuse in a court of law. Social Media banning or censoring adults responsible for their own actions is one thing. Parents acting on behalf of the welfare for their own children is a bit more complicated. Where I suspect lawyers representing social media would advise them to "punt".

    It's a big deal personally to those of us on the spectrum. But to the system, not so much. :oops:
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2020
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  3. Aspychata

    Aspychata Serenity waves, beachy vibes

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    Laws dealing with social media injustices are still behind because this is all still new territory being defined and policing the service providers also falls into a murky area. I personally would be alarmed if my parents filmed me and then that went viral and followed me around for the rest of my life.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2020
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  4. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    It strikes me as a "black hole" in any legal sense.

    For a legal system based on the rule of precedent, very little has been "etched in stone" when it comes to the Internet. I still recall when certain personalities wanted to censor the Internet and hold hosts with most of the legal liability. And that was more than 20 years ago. It's still being hotly debated...:rolleyes:

    Ironic to think that any such precedents related or not may come about not in terms of content, but rather anti-trust concerns. Though even that may end up with no real resolve as well.
     
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  5. Aspychata

    Aspychata Serenity waves, beachy vibes

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    Think it's all very space age in the fact that we are unsure who to hold accountable. The service providers? The content providers? Then there is the area of free speech and that opens a whole new can of internet worms.

    Maybe one day, adults will pursue legal action citing their parents in gross negligent behavior of publicly posted childhood videos that will see penalties awarded by a family judge though it seems hard to imagine.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2020
  6. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    It could interesting if such cases could be a future prime mover in changing the existing limitations in such tort actions. Unfortunately most states' present statute of limitations over personal injury cases tend to be far shorter than the duration of time from childhood to adulthood.
     
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  7. Aspychata

    Aspychata Serenity waves, beachy vibes

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    Good point. Child protective services could step in but they have a bad rep and usually are so bogged down being overworked, it could never fall under their umbrella.
     
  8. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    I'm guessing because of such a crossover of jurisdictions between family and civil court, most any DA would probably warn them simply not to go there. Aside from the fact that a child cannot litigate a personal injury tort action against their parents. And in the case of autistic children who are technically adults there may be other mitigating circumstances like power of attorney to consider. Where different states offer differing degrees of protection to both child and parent.

    Ultimately I suspect that it would be very difficult to prove an accusation of malicious intent on a parent who chooses to publicly video their child's meltdown. Especially if any medical professionals support the parent's actions. In a legal system that understands autism about as well as they do high technology. :oops:
     
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  9. Suzanne

    Suzanne Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    It is a difficult one, because on one hand, you are so right, it is an invasion of privacy, however, for ones who are searching out information, because of suspicions that they may be on the spectrum and not sure if they have meltdowns or if what they have, are constituted as meltdowns, like to watch, to see if there are similarities there.

    I have been so thankful for the opportunity, because I kept bouncing from: I could be, but perhaps I am not and those videos of live meltdowns etc, helped me to find answers.

    The internet itself is an invasion of privacy. Think what some people love to do. Take photos of unsuspecting ones and post on line, to ridicule. Now, that is wrong, because it serves no purpose, other than letting another know that the behaviour of the person photographed is normal.

    Also, many on the spectrum post videos of themselves having meltdowns.
     
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  10. SDRSpark

    SDRSpark Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I agree. And I think if someone can consent (no, not children!) It's OK to share the videos for informational purposes.

    Recording to hare with a doctor or other relevant person on a need to know basis is OK too.
     
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  11. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    Indeed. Proper intent and keeping contact with a medical professional is probably the strongest suit a parent can have in such a situation. Though hopefully whatever they share is not absolutely humiliating or stressful to their child. That it's a two-way issue in this regard. Though it's true, such content may be informational to other parents.
     
  12. Au Naturel

    Au Naturel Au Naturel

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    The problem with this kind of privacy is that nobody but people with autistic children would ever know what an autistic meltdown looked like. I would want to fuzz it enough the child would not be readily identifiable but I don't think there is any legal requirement to do so in most settings.

    If you were to film in controlled conditions and model how to deal with the meltdown with instructional commentary, you'd be doing a proper public service.
     
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  13. Bolletje

    Bolletje Overly complicated potato V.I.P Member

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    I have a huge issue with people uploading videos of others without permission in any case.
     
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  14. SDRSpark

    SDRSpark Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    In this case (blurred faces and used for instructional purposes) I think it's perfectly fine and could even be a good thing.
     
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  15. Au Naturel

    Au Naturel Au Naturel

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    The people who disgust me are the ones who would post it just to get views. There are plenty who would do so.
     
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  16. SDRSpark

    SDRSpark Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Exactly. Views and often, money.
     
  17. Joshua Aaron

    Joshua Aaron ️Autistic Pansexual ️, Chaotic Good V.I.P Member

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    I think it should be up to the platforms to decide if they should ban it or not (which they most certainly should), and not the government. A piece of legislature such as this in the United States would actually cause an uproar because it would violate the 1st amendment. However, social media companies can ban it easily because they are not related to the government at all, and the most popular ones are international, so it would work.

    Internet laws should remain to standardized privacy policies and the usual "plz don't sue" stuff.
     
  18. Gift2humanity

    Gift2humanity Well-Known Member

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    I watched some videos of parents trying to manage their beautiful autistic girls meltdowns, and had a right go at them, they were telling them to calm down.
    To be honest though, I watch them, I feel voyeuristic, I don't do it for fun, I have them myself, injurious ones.
     
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  19. Yeshuasdaughter

    Yeshuasdaughter Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I'm going to scream if I see one more video of some parent exploiting their disabled child for clout.

    It's always the same. The video opens showing some kid focused on playing. The parent, in a super calm, sort of hippie voice says, "This is my son, (insert name), and he has autism." Next, the parent calls the child's name several times in kind of a fake hippie calm voice. The child just keeps on playing. Then the parent shows multiple scenes of the child having meltdows or having a hard time with learning.

    Little does the parent know that in a few years, the kid's peers may find this on Youtube and harass him for it. It sickens me. When my daughter (who is NT) had her tantrums as a baby, I did not film and post it online, that would have been what I consider to be child abuse.

    They're just millennial parents who are trying to get sympathy and look like good SJWs for the "burden" of raising their child.
     
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  20. SDRSpark

    SDRSpark Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    They're definitely not just millenial parents, well, maybe they are but only because millenial parents are the ones with access to the internet. My parents' generation would have totally done this (if not worse) if they had the capability...heck I have an aunt who has been exploiting my cousin's autism to make everything about her for decades.
     
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