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Autistic Doodler

Richelle-H

Relaxed Relativity Inspector
V.I.P Member
Okay, I stop short of calling myself any sort of artist, but i do draw. My medium is Pen and ink on artboard.

They take as long as they take. I try for something that has no fixed frame of reference, which means what you see depends on lighting, distance and angle of viewing. If I stare at one of my creations for any length of time, and allow my mind to free associate, I will find things that were never placed with any conscious input. I am certain my subconscious plays a roll in each and everyone, but i can't really quantify that in any meaningful way.

So here is one of my earliest finished pieces. It is a poor photocopy under bad lighting condition, so it is quite a bit different visually than the original it was taken from, but it will give anyone interested some idea.

I am not overly sensitive, for I have many people that seem to like them, but they are all neurotypicals and I thought it would be instructive to receive commentary from those on the spectrum.

20201216_174103.jpg (Best viewed at the largest image you can manage)

Just thought I would add a advisory here: All drawings here are my original work and I retain all reproduction rights. You may download them, but if you use them in any way, I expect proper attribution. Thank you for reading and commenting. R
 
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Nairobi

Active Member
I love it! I would enjoy a book filled with stuff like that. It reminds me, for some reason, of fairy tales. It looks like something I would find in an enchanted forest.
 

Nairobi

Active Member
Okay, I stop short of calling myself any sort of artist, but i do draw. My medium is Pen and ink on artboard.

They take as long as they take. I try for something that has no fixed frame of reference, which means what you see depends on lighting, distance and angle of viewing. If I stare at one of my creations for any length of time, and allow my mind to free associate, I will find things that were never placed with any conscious input. I am certain my subconscious plays a roll in each and everyone, but i can't really quantify that in any meaningful way.

So here is one of my earliest finished pieces. It is a poor photocopy under bad lighting condition, so it is quite a bit different visually than the original it was taken from, but it will give anyone interested some idea.

I am not overly sensitive, for I have many people that seem to like them, but they are all neurotypicals and I thought it would be instructive to receive commentary from those on the spectrum.

Photo attached below.... (Best viewed at the largest image you can manage)
I used to really, really love art - it was my favorite subject, or shared that spot with English class. I used to draw and paint, I used to love any creative project/medium - just to have the chance to do it. I never made anything great - I often refused my art teacher's suggestions, though they would have actually improved things - I was obsessed with getting out whatever vision was within me, and not overly concerned about whether that would be conveyed in an effective or pleasing way to others, or whether my skills were all that, they were merely adequate. Then....I lost time and opportunity, and now I feel that door is totally shut - I have no inspiration or will or patience or skill anymore. Instead I enjoy other people's art.
 

Suzette

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I think this is an art work that is very dependant on mood for me.

I keep trying to make sense of it and find hidden order. The fact that there is none is disconcerting.

On the othet hand, without order I am given free reighn to feel the art in which ever way my imagination wants to go. I am not consciously manipulated to feel a particular emotion like many figurative works can insist upon. (I'm looking at you Thomas Kincade)

Final analysis: yes this is good art. It evokes strong emotion and thought beyond the scope of it's bare presentation.
 

Nairobi

Active Member
It reminds me of Brian Froud's artwork for some reason. Not directly, but like something that would be in the landscape/surroundings to his fairy figures.
 

Richelle-H

Relaxed Relativity Inspector
V.I.P Member
Thank you Nairobi. I am sorry you lost the connection. I have fallen in and out of it over the years. I started way back near the end of my 20s. I have never had any instruction in art, but had a year or two of drafting.

I one day got the urge to express myself in a private way and had no connection to Drafting. My early forays where done with a black fine tip marker in a sketch book. I remember taking that sketch book to a big Family reunion on my mothers side, and she had a huge foamily. It was held at a lake resort in Mississippi.

Of course, that was back when I had yet to be diagnosed, and I was stressed out by having to attend but felt I could not disappoint my mom. There were aunts and uncles, 8 or 9 first cousins and some 5 or 6 second cousins. A group totaling some 30 in all. Needless to say the whole affair was stressful to me and my sketchbook was something to keep me somewhat normal. Even though I spent most of my time away from everyone, some wandered by and looked over my shoulder and found interest.

I guess I took something away from that, but shortly there after I stopped. It was years before the urge was upon me again. That mainly because I had some things that had been done on fine art paper. A friend at the time saw one and she asked if she could have it. I saw no reason why not, as I had no real emotional connection to it. For my next birthday she presented me with a set of Staedtler Mars mechanical drawing pins with a range of nibs. That led me to start drawing on art board. The dibs had diamond points so they would cut deep into the surface, creating something of a 3-D effect because of the varying depth of the lines. That is something that is lost in that photo image. I would sometimes run my fingers over one of them just to experience it in a whole different way.

Thank you

To end this long ramble, I'll just say that I stopped again in the late nineties. Recently I started again and of course had to replace all my pens. I am still trying to reconnect with my younger self's state of mind, but that is still a work in progress, and to make things more difficult on myself, I decided to try color, but I so far have not taken the plunge. Color adds a different set of emotional content that I may not be ready to face. However, I am making progress with black on white but have yet to satisfy myself completely. It is like starting all over again from scratch, but it still brings me comfort and focus.

Thank you Suzette, your comments actually made me a bit giddy. Oh and Nairobi, your initial comment made my old heart beat for joy in the moment. Maybe I will keep at it after all.
 

Aspychata

Serenity waves, beachy vibes
V.I.P Member
I am thinking Dr Seuss. I am waiting for a bunch of creatures to walk out of that drawing. If l stare long enough l will catch it with my eyes. A mystical wambat, or bird of Sanibel, or something never seen before.

You probably should market this on etsy or something. Thank you for sharing. I find as a part-time artist, l like to dabble in many mediums and bring creativity to everyday things.

And welcome again to this site. A new fan of yours.
 

Nairobi

Active Member
Okay, I stop short of calling myself any sort of artist, but i do draw. My medium is Pen and ink on artboard.

They take as long as they take. I try for something that has no fixed frame of reference, which means what you see depends on lighting, distance and angle of viewing. If I stare at one of my creations for any length of time, and allow my mind to free associate, I will find things that were never placed with any conscious input. I am certain my subconscious plays a roll in each and everyone, but i can't really quantify that in any meaningful way.

So here is one of my earliest finished pieces. It is a poor photocopy under bad lighting condition, so it is quite a bit different visually than the original it was taken from, but it will give anyone interested some idea.

I am not overly sensitive, for I have many people that seem to like them, but they are all neurotypicals and I thought it would be instructive to receive commentary from those on the spectrum.

Photo attached below.... (Best viewed at the largest image you can manage)
If you had to give this a title (or if it has a title), what would it be?
 

Richelle-H

Relaxed Relativity Inspector
V.I.P Member
If you had to give this a title (or if it has a title), what would it be?

Boy, that question was something I have never been asked and not one of my drawings has a title. The first thing that popped into my head while contemplating was "Now You See Me, Now You Don't".

I have a face fixation in my drawings but then not really. If you stare at a specific spot long enough, something will jump out at you, but then disappear when your eyes drift to a different focal point. At least that is the way my drawings work for me. I have had people tell me they see something that I can't so....

What do you think? Does that title work for you or anyone else for that matter.
 

DogzSpirit

There's NOTHING to fix!
V.I.P Member
Oh @Richelle-H , you are SO talented. That is putting it lightly. I look at the image you have provided, and feel a hunger to view the original.

I'd love to see more of your work. It's shockingly creative and hits the eye/mind so wonderfully. If you ever start selling pieces, please let me know. How large are your pieces? Your work is inspiring, fresh, and original.

To move onto color with such (how could I not call it what it is) artistic pieces, would be what I term, you evolving to another chapter of your art.

I have an art background, but I too, have never called myself an artist. I found sketching to be of comfort when younger, and kept evolving until the point of marriage and raising of my children... But that was long long ago. It's been waiting like family, for me to return from my journey.

I still have my art supplies (special pencils/charcoal) and also that of my mothers art supplies. However, I never evolved as far as the color pastels she used. The thickness of the medium was just too little control for my brain. The closest I came to that thickness was in charcoals and blending of such. I have to look up those Staedtler Mars mechanical drawing pins (Are they the mechanical pens-can you send me an amazon link for the type you use?) when I get back to the states. Maybe a new medium is what is needed to push off again!

I've moved from the US to Mexico, and now shall be heading back to the US soon. My art supplies are companions in a strange sense. One day I shall break through my sketch-block and begin again.
 
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Nairobi

Active Member
Boy, that question was something I have never been asked and not one of my drawings has a title. The first thing that popped into my head while contemplating was "Now You See Me, Now You Don't".

I have a face fixation in my drawings but then not really. If you stare at a specific spot long enough, something will jump out at you, but then disappear when your eyes drift to a different focal point. At least that is the way my drawings work for me. I have had people tell me they see something that I can't so....

What do you think? Does that title work for you or anyone else for that matter.
First I see an old man face, then a dog nose, then a wolf face - so I guess so!
 

Richelle-H

Relaxed Relativity Inspector
V.I.P Member
Oh @Richelle-H , you are SO talented. That is putting it lightly. I look at the image you have provided, and feel a hunger to view the original.

I'd love to see more of your work. It's shockingly creative and hits the eye/mind so wonderfully. If you ever start selling pieces, please let me know. How large are your pieces? Your work is inspiring, fresh, and original.

To move onto color with such (how could I not call it what it is) artistic pieces, would be what I term, you evolving to another chapter of your art.

I have an art background, but I too, have never called myself an artist. I found sketching to be of comfort when younger, and kept evolving until the point of marriage and raising of my children... But that was long long ago. It's been waiting like family, for me to return from my journey.

I still have my art supplies (special pencils/charcoal) and also that of my mothers art supplies. However, I never evolved as far as the color pastels she used. The thickness of the medium was just too little control for my brain. The closest I came to that thickness was in charcoals and blending of such. I have to look up those Staedtler Mars mechanical drawing pins (Are they the mechanical pens-can you send me an amazon link for the type you use?) when I get back to the states. Maybe a new medium is what is needed to push off again!

I've moved from the US to Mexico, and now shall be heading back to the US soon. My art supplies are companions in a strange sense. One day I shall break through my sketch-block and begin again.

The pieces very in size. You actually sent me scurrying to my very dilapidated portfolio to check. They are almost all drawn on 15 x 20 in art board and drawn with different size nibs my favorite being 0.1mm. The pens are technical drawing pens but they adopt well to free hand drawing. The set I had, back in the day, cost around 100 US dollars for six pens ranging in size from 0.13mm up to about 0.70mm as I recall. Individual pens can cost upwards of $40 each, the smaller the nib the greater the cost.

Here is an Amazon link to what is available: https://www.amazon.com/Staedtler-Mars-Matic-700-Technical/dp/B003LONTIW?

The thing is, I believe these are steel nibs, so they wear out faster. Not even sure you can find the diamond tip nibs anymore as Mechanical Drawing has moved into the computer age for a lot of technical drawing.

So, the drawing might be a personal favourite, for in 1993 I spen about $35 dollars to get a fine art negative with the ide of maybe making prints of it. Life got in the way of that idea.

It was drawn in the month of December in 1987 over the entire month. (I am not quick) Some of the drawings that I have are meant to be looked at from multiple directions, meaning that if you flip it end over end, everything changes. I conceitedly signed one of my drawings on all four sides because it was drawn from all four perspectives. I constantly rotate any piece I work on to let my mind get a fresh take on what is already there. They're not all like that, but a great many have at least two planes to be looked at. I think of those as changeable art, for if you get tired of looking at it in one orientation you can flip it and find something new and different.

The image sits on the artboard somewhat off center horizontally, It is approximately 9 in. high by 7.5 in wide. I work in negative space as well as positive, which I think is the reason that people see things in my drawings that elude my ability to find.

I have never thrown even my failures away, so there is a lot to draw from (or a lot I drew on!) Anyway, because you asked, I have attached another piece I think is safe to post here. I see my art as organic, it more or less grows like a plant. If it does not mutate into something I dislike, it will eventually get signed.

Anyway, I think I have written enough, other than to say that this new piece was done between May and June of 93. It is not the greatest photo in the world, but I am posting it because I had already posted it elsewhere for a friend to see and did not have to do anything extra to upload it here.

Similar yes, but also quite a bit different as well, and I adore the way light reflects off the ink of the original.
20210730_090147.jpg
 
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Valya81

New Member
I used to really, really love art - it was my favorite subject, or shared that spot with English class. I used to draw and paint, I used to love any creative project/medium - just to have the chance to do it. I never made anything great - I often refused my art teacher's suggestions, though they would have actually improved things - I was obsessed with getting out whatever vision was within me, and not overly concerned about whether that would be conveyed in an effective or pleasing way to others, or whether my skills were all that, they were merely adequate. Then....I lost time and opportunity, and now I feel that door is totally shut - I have no inspiration or will or patience or skill anymore. Instead I enjoy other people's art.
I can relate~!!!!! english class and art!!! You still have it in you, it just takes a while to hush the self-judgement when letting creativity flow. It's so hard, I completely understand
 

DogzSpirit

There's NOTHING to fix!
V.I.P Member
Life does get in the way, and as you said to @Nairobi, that connection falls in and out. My art supplies, traveling with me each time I move. South, North, and up they go again... This time aimed at the mountains of the east coast. I used modes of creation (camera/cabinetry painting, just to keep the creativity alive.

Thanks for that amazon link... I have saved it for my return to the US. And also for sharing yet another creation. I love the original and literal twist to your pieces, the turning of the piece to interest both creator and participants (viewers) later. I am intrigued at how you describe the depth described by the ink, and may indeed indulge by incorporating that fine point pen alongside of my artists pencils. I have a project in mind that may be sharpened up by such, and who knows where that will lead. With a black dog, which is challenging to photograph, I could potentially define facial features (nose/mouth) that otherwise may have been rather dulled out by the artists pencils and charcoals.

I have generally stayed under 15 inches in sketch pad size, but have some much larger and almost intimidating artists paper I snagged long ago at a yard sale. I can see where a piece would span over a good month, or possibly longer. It's a work in progress and likely to be subject to mood peaks, and turbulence of days. I like your vision of organic growing art. I am so accustomed to sitting down and working straight through in the past, and maybe that is working against me and my sketch-block.
 

Gift2humanity

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Okay, I stop short of calling myself any sort of artist, but i do draw. My medium is Pen and ink on artboard.

They take as long as they take. I try for something that has no fixed frame of reference, which means what you see depends on lighting, distance and angle of viewing. If I stare at one of my creations for any length of time, and allow my mind to free associate, I will find things that were never placed with any conscious input. I am certain my subconscious plays a roll in each and everyone, but i can't really quantify that in any meaningful way.

So here is one of my earliest finished pieces. It is a poor photocopy under bad lighting condition, so it is quite a bit different visually than the original it was taken from, but it will give anyone interested some idea.

I am not overly sensitive, for I have many people that seem to like them, but they are all neurotypicals and I thought it would be instructive to receive commentary from those on the spectrum.

Photo attached below.... (Best viewed at the largest image you can manage)
I think it would take a sensitive person to draw that.
It's kinda spiritual.
 

Gift2humanity

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
I used to really, really love art - it was my favorite subject, or shared that spot with English class. I used to draw and paint, I used to love any creative project/medium - just to have the chance to do it. I never made anything great - I often refused my art teacher's suggestions, though they would have actually improved things - I was obsessed with getting out whatever vision was within me, and not overly concerned about whether that would be conveyed in an effective or pleasing way to others, or whether my skills were all that, they were merely adequate. Then....I lost time and opportunity, and now I feel that door is totally shut - I have no inspiration or will or patience or skill anymore. Instead I enjoy other people's art.
You can get it back.
I have a theory about kids who read fairy tales, that they are really wise, even under adverse circumstances.
 

Gift2humanity

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
The pieces very in size. You actually sent me scurrying to my very dilapidated portfolio to check. They are almost all drawn on 15 x 20 in art board and drawn with different size nibs my favorite being 0.1mm. The pens are technical drawing pens but they adopt well to free hand drawing. The set I had, back in the day, cost around 100 US dollars for six pens ranging in size from 0.13mm up to about 0.70mm as I recall. Individual pens can cost upwards of $40 each, the smaller the nib the greater the cost.

Here is an Amazon link to what is available: https://www.amazon.com/Staedtler-Mars-Matic-700-Technical/dp/B003LONTIW?

The thing is, I believe these are steel nibs, so they wear out faster. Not even sure you can find the diamond tip nibs anymore as Mechanical Drawing has moved into the computer age for a lot of technical drawing.

So, the drawing might be a personal favourite, for in 1993 I spen about $35 dollars to get a fine art negative with the ide of maybe making prints of it. Life got in the way of that idea.

It was drawn in the month of December in 1987 over the entire month. (I am not quick) Some of the drawings that I have are meant to be looked at from multiple directions, meaning that if you flip it end over end, everything changes. I conceitedly signed one of my drawings on all four sides because it was drawn from all four perspectives. I constantly rotate any piece I work on to let my mind get a fresh take on what is already there. They're not all like that, but a great many have at least two planes to be looked at. I think of those as changeable art, for if you get tired of looking at it in one orientation you can flip it and find something new and different.

The image sits on the artboard somewhat off center horizontally, It is approximately 9 in. high by 7.5 in wide. I work in negative space as well as positive, which I think is the reason that people see things in my drawings that elude my ability to find.

I have never thrown even my failures away, so there is a lot to draw from (or a lot I drew on!) Anyway, because you asked, I have attached another piece I think is safe to post here. I see my art as organic, it more or less grows like a plant. If it does not mutate into something I dislike, it will eventually get signed.

Anyway, I think I have written enough, other than to say that this new piece was done between May and June of 93. It is not the greatest photo in the world, but I am posting it because I had already posted it elsewhere for a friend to see and did not have to do anything extra to upload it here.

Similar yes, but also quite a bit different as well, and I adore the way light reflects off the ink of the original.
Ypu have a very good command of line.
 

Richelle-H

Relaxed Relativity Inspector
V.I.P Member
Everyone has been so generous with their comments I went to the trouble of creating a jpg of my second favourite piece. It is poor quality both in its resolution and lighting, but it was the best I could do with what I have to work with. Even so, it does show much of the detail.

It is a prime example of what I meant when I talked about some of my drawings presenting differently upside down. It has things it it that you will only see by doing so (if you can manage it without too much trouble).

This piece owes a little bit to my fascination with M.C. Escher's drawings, without slavishly trying to emulate his unique talent.

Thank you all for giving me a different outlook on my work. I would not say it is truly spiritual, but rather a fairly accurate roadmap of my headspace at the time of their drawing, which is why each has a uniqueness all its own while sharing similarities.

One More.jpg
 

Gift2humanity

Well-Known Member
V.I.P Member
Everyone has been so generous with their comments I went to the trouble of creating a jpg of my second favourite piece. It is poor quality both in its resolution and lighting, but it was the best I could do with what I have to work with. Even so, it does show much of the detail.

It is a prime example of what I meant when I talked about some of my drawings presenting differently upside down. It has things it it that you will only see by doing so (if you can manage it without too much trouble).

This piece owes a little bit to my fascination with M.C. Escher's drawings, without slavishly trying to emulate his unique talent.

Thank you all for giving me a different outlook on my work. I would not say it is truly spiritual, but rather a fairly accurate roadmap of my headspace at the time of their drawing, which is why each has a uniqueness all its own while sharing similarities.

View attachment 69824
That looks psychedelic.
 

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