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Aspie Veteran

Harry Foxwell

New Member
Hi all!

I'm a 72-year old Vietnam veteran. Having learned a good bit about
Aspergers and Autism through self-education and a wife in special
education, I look back on my early years and recognize my clearly
Aspie characteristics at the time, although no attempt or understanding
that many years ago to diagnose such a condition. Also, I'm pretty much
convinced that my Aspieness in some way shielded me from combat
related PTSD (although I do wonder if others had similar experiences).
Anyway, just happened to find this site and thought I would connect,
learn, and maybe contribute a bit.
 
That was an interesting observation. In what way would autism shield you from PTSD? The connection is not obvious to me.

And by the way, welcome!
 
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Hi & Welcome,
Glad to hear it worked in your favor in this instance against PSTD.
 
Welcome aboard! I guess having muted emotions or empathetic feelings might shield you somewhat against PTSD.
 
I never had to go thru any PSTD experience (was Air Force technician) but did notice my reactions were often at variance with my NT co-workers. What bothered or didn't bother us could be quite different at times. Thankyou for serving btw.
 
Welcome to the Forums! I hope you make new friends and enjoy your stay in the process! :)
 
Welcome, @Harry Foxwell. I hope you find this forum as welcoming and useful as I have.

I'm pretty much
convinced that my Aspieness in some way shielded me from combat
related PTSD (although I do wonder if others had similar experiences).

I've never been in the military or combat, but I think that my autism protected me in some very traumatic family situations. Everyone else was freaking out but I was off in my own world. It doesn't mean that I didn't deal with them emotionally - I did, but at a much slower pace than everyone else around me, and in my own way.
 
Well, it's speculation of course, but I think my Aspie characteristics of
dissociating in a way was part of that. Viewing situations literally and
more objectively in a detached manner rather than emotionally probably
explains it. Some lack of empathy perhaps too? Not sure.
 
Well, it's speculation of course, but I think my Aspie characteristics of
dissociating in a way was part of that. Viewing situations literally and
more objectively in a detached manner rather than emotionally probably
explains it. Some lack of empathy perhaps too? Not sure.

Hi Harry! Welcome to the forums!

Makes sense to me!
I'm guessing you identify more with option B over here: Does this analogy fit you?
 
Big thanks to you for your service and may this forum bring some answers and more insight, or maybe you will be bringing the insight?
 
Welcome to the forums Harry.
I think you could bring some insights to us also.
Many thanks for your service!
 
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