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Featured aspergers and acting?

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by harrietjansson, Jan 14, 2021.

  1. harrietjansson

    harrietjansson Well-Known Member

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    Why do some people talk about how many aspies are good at acting and that it is related to the diagnosis? Sure there are aspies who are good at acting and singing but I don't see how this is specifically related to ASD. All I know is that some aspies practice acting and singing. This is why they get good at it. Perhaps having problems with social situations can lead some people to go into acting. I myself like acting and singing but it is not that much related to ASD other than that I am very good at certain skills but have issues with other skills which is common in ASD.
    What do you think?
     
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  2. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    I suppose it all comes down to how well one can handle their own sense of masking their autistic traits and behaviors. Certainly some better than others. That for a very few, acting might actually come naturally.

    For some of us, we might welcome a temporary ability to be someone else. Even if it is just a charade that may pay reasonably well.

    But yes, acting in itself regardless of neurological considerations is definitely a skill. One that only a few seem to truly master over time.
     
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  3. OkRad

    OkRad μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος οὐλομένην V.I.P Member

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    I suck at acting. I had to learn to mask. But I hated it. But maybe I would like acting. Probably not. Too many people around.
     
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  4. harrietjansson

    harrietjansson Well-Known Member

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    masking? why does acting have to be the same as masking?
    Can't we just learn how to deal with social situations without masking? It has worked for me. I have learned how to be myself in social situations. Acting helps with this.
    I am sure this does not work for everyone. Some may need masking but I don't really need it. I always have to change my behaviour in different situations but I don't use masking.
    What I do is this: I use my strengths. I may be a bit shy in some situations but I only try to be myself. So masking is a no no for me.
     
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  5. Neonatal RRT

    Neonatal RRT Well-Known Member

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    There is acting and singing,...then there is being successful at acting and singing. The first time I heard of this was listening to Dr. Tony Atwood, speaking about a conversation he had with his daughter. Evidently, his daughter is involved in the entertainment business (more administrative),...and she noted the disproportionate amount of clients (entertainers) that were Aspies.

    A certain amount of "extraordinary" interest, commitment, self-motivation is needed to be successful,...in any field or endeavor. Being "neurodivergent" is also a prerequisite in order to push the boundaries, to be unique, to constantly reinvent yourself in order to grab media attention and be currently relevant. To have a bit of narcissism to mentally disregard the naysayers and keep forging ahead is another attribute. Are there neurotypicals who fit into this description,...sure,...but likely a disproportionate of Aspies do, as well.
     
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  6. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    Another thing to consider. For most of us, masking is exhausting. It's no hobby, and it ain't pretty.

    Under such circumstances, could acting be any better? Could we differentiate between the two?

    I'm not sure. :oops:
     
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  7. harrietjansson

    harrietjansson Well-Known Member

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    Masking refers to?
    How are you using the term?
    I never use it so I don't really know what it refers to.
    All I know is that a professional once told me that shaking hands (we obviously stopped doing it) when not wanting to could be considered masking. Doing what you d8n't wanna do is masking?
    Wouldn't it be better to try being yourself rather than masking?
    Why do people mask? Can't they be themselves?
     
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  8. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps best to do a text search on masking in this forum. Lots and lots of posts about it. The pursuit by autistic people to appear Neurotypical only on a limited, superficial basis. Never to actually fit in per se, but simply doing what it takes to avoid an emotional or physical beating by others.

    Until I discovered my own autism, I used to be baffled by why social engagements with others would leave me exhausted, often with a tension headache afterwards. Even when they occasionally went positively. :eek:
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2021
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  9. Tom

    Tom Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    There may be some similarities but I don't believe masking and acting are the same thing. And masking is not something that Aspies are necessarily good at. Its just something that we find ourselves often trying to do, to fit in.
     
  10. Wolfsage

    Wolfsage In training to be Wolf King.

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    But, are we better actors because we practice masking?
    In my opinion most of us would make pretty good actors.
     
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  11. Thinx

    Thinx Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Well arguably if we mask we are acting a part, in general terms. But I don't think that means many of us would be great at acting as a profession.

    One point I wonder about, is, one would expect Tony Attwoods daughter to be quite good at recognising Aspies; so, as she works in entertainment, she recognises Aspies there. But if she worked in rail travel, maybe she'd recognise them there, or if she worked in teaching, or in a supermarket or a cheese factory...

    Whereas in my experience many or most people aren't good at recognising Aspies, including counsellors, and hey even plenty of the people who are responsible for diagnosis! So, perhaps the unusual thing here is Tony Attwoods daughter's ability to recognise Aspies, rather than that there are necessarily more of them in entertainment work than other professions.
     
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  12. Finder

    Finder Active Member

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    It might not be the autistics are better actors, but rather given that our disorder is centered in a social communication deficit, it surprises people. They just don't know that the ability to social mask can be an asset in acting.
     
  13. _eri_bellehumeur

    _eri_bellehumeur Member

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    I've never heard about an affinity for acting being an aspie thing, but it makes sense. It seems like women on the spectrum in particular are very familiar with acting in daily life through masking their traits and pretending to be neurotypical individuals. People on the spectrum who are interested in human behaviour and study it out of either necessity or fascination are likely going to be good at acting as they pay close attention to people, read a lot of psychology resources, etc. to help them integrate with the world at large. Perhaps acting allows people on the spectrum to engage in social interaction in a manner that feels safe, because the interactions are more or less structured according to a script, so there is less concern over saying the wrong thing or somehow botching the interaction.
     
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  14. lolcatal

    lolcatal Well-Known Member

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    Some of us are very good at masking, and at focusing all of our attention on our interest for a long period of time (like spending hours rehearsing).

    For me, acting on stage in front of a huge crowd is waaayyyy less stressful than a 30-minute conversation with one human being.
     
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  15. SusanLR

    SusanLR Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    From my own experience with performing arts, there is a strange, but, explainable aspect to it.

    I have been a model, a teacher, a metaphysical preacher, and a not for profit singer as entertainment
    for psych wards in hospitals and theme parks.

    There is a difference in being a part of the crowd or on stage having fun, but, not being a part of
    the crowd.
    On stage or in front of a group, I don't have to interact or make conversation.
    I enjoy seeing the patients in the psych units having a little fun from volunteer entertainers.
    And I don't feel uneasy with them. After all I fit right in. Been on the patient side before.

    Teaching, is more organized and I like to see the people interested in the subject matter.

    On the catwalk I felt recognised, and it fed the ego without having anything to speak with the audience.

    It really does make a difference if you're a part of the crowd or performing for the crowd.
    I like rock concerts and get caught up in the energy of being in the audience along with everyone else.
    But, being on stage is a different type of energy. It's a rush. :D

    I wonder if other Aspies feel this way? Could it be a reason if there really are a lot who enjoy
    performing arts?
     
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  16. Suzanne

    Suzanne Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Although I have never entered into acting, I have been told a few times, that I would do great in a theatre, because of how I can take on a different character and I guess it is related to masking, but in my obsession with finding out about aspergers, I discovered that it is more to do with females on the spectrum and I never thought I did mask, since I have never been good in social settings, but in fact, I do mask a lot, because my true self, I am even frightened of ie talking too much and saying innappropriate things and stimming very openly and basically, being like a child.

    I cannot sing though, which is frustrating, because I love music.

    What I found is that there is a female character in a korean drama I am watching and I love her personality and realised that I am mimicking her quite a lot, so I guess that could be seen as acting lol

    Since I am not keen on self, pretending to be another is very appealing to me.
     
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  17. Dadamen

    Dadamen Well-Known Member

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    Acting and singing might become special interests like every other thing and that can be ASD part. But, also if you speak like a robot, have social anxiety or sensory issues this may disrupt you from these things.
     
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  18. UberScout

    UberScout Are you there, God? ...Hello? V.I.P Member

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    I only know a month of drama club from high school and I need no further education in how to pull off a near flawless Sean Connery accent.
     
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  19. Tom

    Tom Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    I am not sure about this concept.

    I think it possible, even likely, autistics are over represented in the arts in general. Over my 10 years or so participating exclusively on Aspie forums I have seen many, many, people who practice some art form and a high degree of interest in arts.

    But when it comes to acting, and I mean it in the simple sense of acting in theatre/movies/tv, I have not seen or heard of hardly any diagnosed autistic. Off the top of my head, I can think of only a single example.

    tumblr_n6mho54mmo1qc3ju8o5_500.gif

    And it also occurs to me that in two films she is best known for she did not play a human.

    st_20200417_trend17ja1c_56047912.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021
  20. Joshua Aaron

    Joshua Aaron Autistic Pansexual Enby! (they/them) V.I.P Member

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    What about being a VA? It's usually just you in a sound booth with a mic, and then like one or two audio engineers and then maybe the director of the film/movie/game/whatever.