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Already suffering at work

Discussion in 'Education and Employment' started by DanPaladin, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. DanPaladin

    DanPaladin Aspie and nerd, greatest combination.

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    I just worked 2 days at Aldi and I'm already making many mistakes. I'm working mostly at the register and many times I had to cancel the product or purchase and start again. They want someone fast and accurate, but if I'm fast I commit mistakes and have to ask for assistance all the time.

    I'm thinking now that even the managers don't like me. Almost certain that I won't pass the probation period. I just don't know what to do with my life.
     
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  2. Pats

    Pats Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    It's only been 2 days - don't be so hard on yourself. The more nervous you are the more likely you are to make mistakes, so just take your time and don't get stressed out. Speed - you'll pick that up later.
     
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  3. tducey

    tducey Well-Known Member

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    Everyone has those jitters when they start a job. I've had them. Thing is don't let them get you down, accept assistance and learn from your mistakes. Wishing you all the best.
     
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  4. Fino

    Fino Well-Known Member

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    Everyone makes those mistakes at the beginning! I've been a cashier at many different places and it was terrible at first, but I got pretty good eventually!
     
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  5. Progster

    Progster Gone sideways to the sun V.I.P Member

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    It's better to work slowly and accurately - given time, you'll speed up. Don't compare yourself to your coworkers, because they've been there for a while and have had time to reach their speed. Nobody can work fast when they first start. If you try to work fast and make mistakes, that's just going to draw negative attention to yourself and you don't want that.
     
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  6. Monachopia

    Monachopia ...spiral out... keep going.

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    It's ok to make mistakes at first. When I had to train new people on the tills I fully expected to run and help them out for the first week or so. Go at your own pace at first and don't feel pressure to go fast until you're comfortable to speed up a little bit. Customers are understanding - when I was starting out on tills I told them "I'm new, thank you for your patience" - don't say "I'm sorry I'm new" as that's language that implies you're inconveniencing them. By thanking them in advance they can't argue with that.
     
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  7. Bolletje

    Bolletje Potato chip wizard

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    Making mistakes is how you learn. Give it time.
     
  8. Mattymatt

    Mattymatt Imperfectly Perfect

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    Your manager cannot reasonably expect you not to make mistakes ina new job. Just try not to go so hard on yourself. You have the right attitude of wanting to do the best job possible. Think of the people that show up to work to do the least amount paid and lack a work ethic. Remember, we've all been new at things in our lives at least once. Don't be so hard on yourself and allow time to learn.
     
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  9. Mr Allen

    Mr Allen Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Yeah at least you actually WANT to work, unlike the workshy Chavs who end up on Jeremy Kyle every morning.
     
  10. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    I can understand your choice to use the term to define those who choose not to look for work, as opposed to those who try. However you might want to revisit what the term "Chavs" implies, and consider dropping it from your vocabulary. (See the link below and read the entire article.)

    Making class-conscious and disparaging comments against the working class and unemployed is something I might expect from a gainfully employed middle class Tory. Not someone who exclusively supports the Labour Party, unemployed and survives only on government entitlements. Awkward to say the least.

    Historically and ideologically the political left routinely mocks the bourgeoisie and the wealthy. Not the poor- whether able-bodied, disabled, unemployed or gainfully employed.

    "There are plenty of people for whom the word is harmless. Daily Telegraph blogger James Delingpole argues it's merely an updating of "oik".

    But more left-leaning commentators have seen it as shorthand for bashing the poor. In 2008 the Fabian Society urged the BBC to put it on their list of offensive terms."

    Why is 'chav' still controversial?
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
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  11. Monachopia

    Monachopia ...spiral out... keep going.

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    That's interesting, thank you Judge. Personally, I didn't realise it's not a good term to use anymore. I don't usually use it, but, I only ever used it to describe the burberry wearing types who go out of their way to be loud and offensive rather than anything social class related. Anyone can be a "chav" really in my eyes, even the middle class who are trying to be something they're not. I always shy away from those types because they'd quite often pass rude comments at me in the past when I was more "goth". Regardless, I should probably rethink using that term even though I'm neither a Conservative or Labour supporter, but if it has connotations to the ongoing class divide, it seems sensible to strike it from the vocabulary.
     
  12. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I found it an interesting article myself. Though as it states, there are any number of those using it with or without all the broad-based potential connotations intended. Making it I suppose precarious to apply depending on the context, politics and audience.

    Reminds me of "Yuppies" and "Hipsters". Terms that while may have distinct meanings, yet ultimately are used most often to disparage people and little else. Potentially compromising those using such terms with no ill will intended. Especially in politically polarized environments that exist on both sides of the pond at the moment.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
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  13. Tom

    Tom Well-Known Member

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    Are there other positions there you might be better at?
     
  14. Judge

    Judge Well-Known Member

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    I worked retail jobs before myself, but I did find them stressful. Just can't say I ever enjoyed personal interaction with one customer after another.